No Time To Die: Production Diary

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  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited March 2018 Posts: 23,883
    Wasn't Trainspotting responsible for introducing the world to a whole new slew of British actors? I'd imagine we'd see something again. I think it was a precursor to films like Snatch and even Layer Cake.

    Moreover, as I recall (I haven't seen it) the film was seen as very hip and relevant to the youth culture at the time. Bond needs that now in my view. This could be why they are going in this direction.
  • Posts: 5,715
    @SeanCraig -- I've mentioned before, a while ago, of having Camille the person who finds Bond living "off-the-grid" (some beautiful island where he's been gambling and drinking his nights away, sleeping with all the married women he can get his hands on; not at all like SF)... Camille needs help from this ex-spy and she's tracked him down, and whatever this problem is, it's big enough for Bond to return to active service. So, in essence, she's the catalyst to bring 007 back into the fold.
  • SeanCraigSeanCraig Germany
    Posts: 684
    @peter : This sounds good! It would be in-line with the continuity of the Craig era, kinda pick up where SP left (4 years ago) and still lead to a more colourful adventure. Plus - there can‘t be anything wrong seeing Olga again :-)
  • ClarkDevlinClarkDevlin Martinis, Girls and Guns
    Posts: 15,423
    peter wrote: »
    I've mentioned before, a while ago, of having Camille the person who finds Bond living "off-the-grid" (some beautiful island where he's been gambling and drinking his nights away, sleeping with all the married women he can get his hands on; not at all like SF)... Camille needs help from this ex-spy and she's tracked him down, and whatever this problem is, it's big enough for Bond to return to active service. So, in essence, she's the catalyst to bring 007 back into the fold.
    This would be a brilliant idea. That's how things should be handled.
  • Posts: 5,715
    yes, big fan of Olga (gets the blood pumping in all the right places!)...
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    edited March 2018 Posts: 4,192
    I really don't see them going back to Camille, a character from 2008. (White was one thing but he was in two films.) The freshness of most Bond films is that there is a new love interest, villain, etc. and I expect them to do the same here.

    Don't forget that Boyle basically introduced Naomie Harris to world cinema in 28 Days Later, so he's likely to feel vested in her success.
  • ClarkDevlinClarkDevlin Martinis, Girls and Guns
    Posts: 15,423
    Camille's return was hinted by Olga many times, actually. If they set their minds to it, there are many ways to bring her back. And @peter's idea is one of the more plausible ways to do it.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    echo wrote: »
    I really don't see them going back to Camille, a character from 2008. (White was one thing but he was in two films.) The freshness of most Bond films is that there is a new love interest, villain, etc. and I expect them to do the same here.

    Don't forget that Boyle basically introduced Naomie Harris to world cinema in 28 Days Later, so he's likely to feel vested in her success.
    I agree that it's unlikely we see any reference to QoS again, particularly if they want us to forget continuity and the last film (it doesn't make sense to go back to 2008 when there is arguably unfinished business from 2015).

    I'm concerned to learn about Harris and Boyle's history. I was hoping to see far less of her in B25.
  • SeanCraigSeanCraig Germany
    edited March 2018 Posts: 684
    I don‘t think her role would be as big as in QoS - but it would work great plus be in-line with the Craig era ... after all the continuity aspect is one element that defines it. Letting Camille start the wheels for B25 is a much better way to interconnect Craig‘s films like that ... „idea“ we got in SP. It‘s a plausible, very good idea.
  • Posts: 8,379
    My hope bond starts the film waking from a nightmare and Dench is still M and Quantum is still loose so skyfall and spectre never happened lol
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    From Boyle's Wikepedia:

    Quote of his:
    "To be a film-maker...you have to lead. You have to be psychotic in your desire to do something. People always like the easy route. You have to push very hard to get something unusual, something different."

    Quote about him from his Trainspotting producer:
    "Boyle takes a subject that you've often seen portrayed realistically, in a politically correct way, whether it's junkies or slum orphans, and he has managed to make it realistic but also incredibly uplifting and joyful."

    Boyle on his own films:
    "There's a theme running through all of them—and I just realised this. They're all about someone facing impossible odds and overcoming them."

    We are in for something rather radically different from how I read this in conjunction with Bambigoye's article.
  • edited March 2018 Posts: 684
    Birdleson wrote: »
    One of my favorite aspects of Boyle's films is the crisp energy and spontaneity he infuses them with. Whether dark or light, humorous or nauseating; his films never fail to feel vibrant, fresh and alive to me. That quality is what I want to see him bring to a Bond film; and I think that he will. The big issue for me is whether he is going to have to get himself mired in the clumsy continuity of SP, or will he be given the freedom to ignore all of that mess. Again, I am cautiously optimistic that EON must see that, with the passage of a little time, SP is generally regarded as a disappointment; and surely it doesn't take a lot of insight to realize that the two jewels of the Craig Era (financially, critically, with audiences and, now, their historic place in the canon), CR and SF, were filmed as (and intended to be) one-offs; both were followed by less successful sequels that forced general audiences to remember and care about things from several years prior; and that has never been the draw of the cinematic Bond. I think that there is reason to feel good.
    Well said. His films do have a velocity to them. Actually, partly similar to how Fleming's writing leaps to life off the page. I'm delighted to hear that the books were such a part of his formative years, and if this B25 idea he's got turns out to be partly derived from unused Fleming material itself that's all to the better.
    bondjames wrote: »
    Wasn't Trainspotting responsible for introducing the world to a whole new slew of British actors? I'd imagine we'd see something again. I think it was a precursor to films like Snatch and even Layer Cake.

    Moreover, as I recall (I haven't seen it) the film was seen as very hip and relevant to the youth culture at the time. Bond needs that now in my view. This could be why they are going in this direction.
    It definitely needs that again. And 'youth' yes but not in the way that many films now are (see below). Hip to me signals the reactions of rebellious teenagers, young adults, twentysomethings, etc. 'Hip' sort of meaning all the stuff that your parents poo-poo. I wasn't around in the 60s but I understand that Bond firmly fit in with the spirit of the Beatles, the Pythons, David Bailey, Mary Quant, et. al. Twenty years after that, by the late '80s, it seems the franchise might have been in a similar state hipness-wise as now. Is that right?
    bondjames wrote: »
    From Boyle's Wikepedia:

    Quote of his:
    "To be a film-maker...you have to lead. You have to be psychotic in your desire to do something. People always like the easy route. You have to push very hard to get something unusual, something different."

    Quote about him from his Trainspotting producer:
    "Boyle takes a subject that you've often seen portrayed realistically, in a politically correct way, whether it's junkies or slum orphans, and he has managed to make it realistic but also incredibly uplifting and joyful."

    Boyle on his own films:
    "There's a theme running through all of them—and I just realised this. They're all about someone facing impossible odds and overcoming them."

    We are in for something rather radically different from how I read this in conjunction with Bambigoye's article.
    Thanks for those. He's saying all the right things as far as I'm concerned. I do like listening to him speak. I've posted this before so forgive me, I don't mean to beat everyone over the head with it, but it's likewise encouraging to me: Danny Boyle talks about a "Pixarification of movies"
  • Posts: 444
    Strog wrote: »
    He's saying all the right things as far as I'm concerned. I do like listening to him speak. I've posted this before so forgive me, I don't mean to beat everyone over the head with it, but it's likewise encouraging to me: Danny Boyle talks about a "Pixarification of movies"

    That interview is pretty encouraging if he can apply that approach to Bond. A bit of 70s grit and realism, where the violence resonates rather than just provides a cartoonish pop art fight sequence. Fleming's Bond certainly suffered out in the field and Craig would be a good Bond to bring out that side of the character on screen again.

    One can only hope the plot will be strong and compelling and Boyle brings a visceral reality back to the spy genre. I'm going to remain glass half full on this and hope we genuinely do get an entry in which the franchise is revitalised, Craig leaves on a high and we're back to thinking it's a shame he couldn't have done more...rather than the appetite to see the back of him which we seem to have now.
  • Posts: 5,715
    I'm re-reading John Pearson's authorized biography of Bond. It's quite a special portrait and expands on Fleming's idea of the man. I'd love Craig to read this before production, since it does give a charming glimpse into how an older Bond thinks of himself and his importance in this life of his. There are many enjoyable descriptions (as he orders his drinks and food-- someone who knows what he wants and he always gets what he wants; the idea that his true addiction is danger. He gets the most out of life when his life is at risk (he describes a skiing adventure he went on as a teen; from that moment forth, he was always chasing the same thrill of death-defying)...
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited March 2018 Posts: 23,883
    Strog wrote: »
    Birdleson wrote: »
    One of my favorite aspects of Boyle's films is the crisp energy and spontaneity he infuses them with. Whether dark or light, humorous or nauseating; his films never fail to feel vibrant, fresh and alive to me. That quality is what I want to see him bring to a Bond film; and I think that he will. The big issue for me is whether he is going to have to get himself mired in the clumsy continuity of SP, or will he be given the freedom to ignore all of that mess. Again, I am cautiously optimistic that EON must see that, with the passage of a little time, SP is generally regarded as a disappointment; and surely it doesn't take a lot of insight to realize that the two jewels of the Craig Era (financially, critically, with audiences and, now, their historic place in the canon), CR and SF, were filmed as (and intended to be) one-offs; both were followed by less successful sequels that forced general audiences to remember and care about things from several years prior; and that has never been the draw of the cinematic Bond. I think that there is reason to feel good.
    Well said. His films do have a velocity to them. Actually, partly similar to how Fleming's writing leaps to life off the page. I'm delighted to hear that the books were such a part of his formative years, and if this B25 idea he's got turns out to be partly derived from unused Fleming material itself that's all to the better.
    bondjames wrote: »
    Wasn't Trainspotting responsible for introducing the world to a whole new slew of British actors? I'd imagine we'd see something again. I think it was a precursor to films like Snatch and even Layer Cake.

    Moreover, as I recall (I haven't seen it) the film was seen as very hip and relevant to the youth culture at the time. Bond needs that now in my view. This could be why they are going in this direction.
    It definitely needs that again. And 'youth' yes but not in the way that many films now are (see below). Hip to me signals the reactions of rebellious teenagers, young adults, twentysomethings, etc. 'Hip' sort of meaning all the stuff that your parents poo-poo. I wasn't around in the 60s but I understand that Bond firmly fit in with the spirit of the Beatles, the Pythons, David Bailey, Mary Quant, et. al. Twenty years after that, by the late '80s, it seems the franchise might have been in a similar state hipness-wise as now. Is that right?
    bondjames wrote: »
    From Boyle's Wikepedia:

    Quote of his:
    "To be a film-maker...you have to lead. You have to be psychotic in your desire to do something. People always like the easy route. You have to push very hard to get something unusual, something different."

    Quote about him from his Trainspotting producer:
    "Boyle takes a subject that you've often seen portrayed realistically, in a politically correct way, whether it's junkies or slum orphans, and he has managed to make it realistic but also incredibly uplifting and joyful."

    Boyle on his own films:
    "There's a theme running through all of them—and I just realised this. They're all about someone facing impossible odds and overcoming them."

    We are in for something rather radically different from how I read this in conjunction with Bambigoye's article.
    Thanks for those. He's saying all the right things as far as I'm concerned. I do like listening to him speak. I've posted this before so forgive me, I don't mean to beat everyone over the head with it, but it's likewise encouraging to me: Danny Boyle talks about a "Pixarification of movies"
    Thanks for that interview. It's certainly encouraging, but I wonder if he will be able to combine that approach with a global audience of all ages which the Bond films aspire to. I don't disagree with him though. Star Wars did appear to be beginning of a radical shift in what types of films were successful and how we view blockbusters. The popcorn era, if you will. I think there was a shift back to darkness, grit and uncertainty post-911, but there appears to be a move back to lightness again.

    Yes, I agree that Bond did seem to be somewhat counter-culture and rebellious for its time in its heyday. Provocative and somewhat edgy. Daring and forward leaning - not following or looking back.

    I think the only thing we can safely take from piecing together his words is we will have to expect the unexpected from him. He will be unconventional and daring, as he appears to be a film maker who can capture or define the essence of the time or the "zeitgeist". I'm sure we will all interpret what that means through our own filter, lens and preferences for the next year and a 1/2.

    If he's as good as he seems, we'll all be pleasantly surprised with the final product.
  • Posts: 11,285
    peter wrote: »
    I'm re-reading John Pearson's authorized biography of Bond. It's quite a special portrait and expands on Fleming's idea of the man. I'd love Craig to read this before production, since it does give a charming glimpse into how an older Bond thinks of himself and his importance in this life of his. There are many enjoyable descriptions (as he orders his drinks and food-- someone who knows what he wants and he always gets what he wants; the idea that his true addiction is danger. He gets the most out of life when his life is at risk (he describes a skiing adventure he went on as a teen; from that moment forth, he was always chasing the same thrill of death-defying)...

    I'd like think Craig has probably read it at some point. That book was a good read as far as I remember. Been years. I can almost imagine at this point, Eon going for something like an adaptation of this book. Completely different and not the same old Bond.
    Considering Boyle has had his Bond idea since 2012, I feel pretty confident in assuming that B25 will not be an adaptation of YOLT, Risico, The Property of a Lady , etc.
    I feel cautiously optimistic. I am thrilled there's a different writer. P & W were no Maibaum, IMO.

    In a way I'm kind of hoping for a low key Bond thriller, which I imagine Boyle could deliver. At the same time, I would love a return to some classic traditions without the formula conspicuously clicking all the boxes as per TND.
    My hunch, however is that we may get a character driven drama that is promoted as being different from all the other Bond films in that "this time.........it's personal."
  • Goldeneye0094Goldeneye0094 Conyers, GA
    Posts: 464
    https://www.express.co.uk/entertainment/films/930176/James-Bond-25-Daniel-Craig-M-death-Logan-Hugh-Jackman-Wolverine-Danny-Boyle-John-Hodge

    How do you all feel about the idea of bond dying at the end of bond 25? I think it would be a very bold move.
  • ClarkDevlinClarkDevlin Martinis, Girls and Guns
    Posts: 15,423
    It's a godawful idea.
  • SeanCraigSeanCraig Germany
    Posts: 684
    I don‘t need that movie then - I liked „Logan“ and I for sure don‘t want to see this happen to James Bond. If they do so, they finally went nuts.

    I doubt that unless they want to retire the whole film series.
  • PropertyOfALadyPropertyOfALady Colders Federation CEO
    Posts: 3,526
    It's a godawful idea.

    I agree.
  • jake24jake24 Sitting at your desk, kissing your lover, eating supper with your familyModerator
    Posts: 10,372
    They could go the Logan route without killing him, but killing him is indeed a horrible idea.
  • SeanCraigSeanCraig Germany
    edited March 2018 Posts: 684
    But why to go that route? They did this stuff (kinda) with SF and (to many) it was good that way but ended encouraging with James Bond on the rooftop. So why, especially after Spectre, would they want to do the very same stuff again just even more drastic? What a terrible idea.

    If that would turn out to be true I‘d end the Bond series with Skyfall for myself and ignore the rest.
  • talos7talos7 New Orleans
    Posts: 5,640
    Actually the ambiguous ending of SPECTRE, with Bond driving away from MI-6 was a fitting conclusion, in the wrong film.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 33,904
    I agree, that would be a terrible idea.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    I am of the belief that Logan (sans death) was the essence of the P&W screenplay. That's old hat.

    Boyle is going to be quite different. Dynamic.
  • ClarkDevlinClarkDevlin Martinis, Girls and Guns
    Posts: 15,423
    Too early to assume, in my opinion.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    Too early to assume, in my opinion.
    Indeed. Quite right. That's not going to stop any of us over here though. It's what we do.
  • edited March 2018 Posts: 11,285
    I hate to say this, but after the stepbrother B.S. and this newfound need to make Oscar worthy Bond films, I wouldn't be surprised if indeed this is the route they're going. If there's even the slightest chance Craig could be nominated for best actor by playing 007's death scene I think Eon would jump at it.

    Also, it's very trendy right now to kill off the main characters in beloved franchises: Han Solo, Luke, Superman, etc. Eon is no longer a trendsetter but follower.

    I personally think it would make B25 the last film in the series as I wouldn't hold my breath for a re-boot. Then Mickey G could retire and Barbara could focus on her independent films.
  • edited March 2018 Posts: 684
    Cowley wrote: »
    Strog wrote: »
    He's saying all the right things as far as I'm concerned. I do like listening to him speak. I've posted this before so forgive me, I don't mean to beat everyone over the head with it, but it's likewise encouraging to me: Danny Boyle talks about a "Pixarification of movies"

    That interview is pretty encouraging if he can apply that approach to Bond. A bit of 70s grit and realism, where the violence resonates rather than just provides a cartoonish pop art fight sequence. Fleming's Bond certainly suffered out in the field and Craig would be a good Bond to bring out that side of the character on screen again.

    One can only hope the plot will be strong and compelling and Boyle brings a visceral reality back to the spy genre. I'm going to remain glass half full on this and hope we genuinely do get an entry in which the franchise is revitalised, Craig leaves on a high and we're back to thinking it's a shame he couldn't have done more...rather than the appetite to see the back of him which we seem to have now.
    Agreed. If Boyle wants to bring that 'violence with consequences' and 70s grit sensibility, I'm all for it. I think it'd be a fine thing for Craig's last film to veer nearer his initial couple rather than continue on the post-SF trajectory. That said, there are certain worries that would come with that like...
    bondjames wrote: »
    It's certainly encouraging, but I wonder if he will be able to combine that approach with a global audience of all ages which the Bond films aspire to.
    That's very true, and therein would lie the difficulty. It would be tough. I'm sure to some extent Barbara and Michael were having the same thoughts during the DAD->CR transition (although as you point out that sort of realism was then a box office driver and would have been perhaps less risky than now).

    But this will be a Bond film after all (and so there's automatically going to be box office interest), and it's Boyle (and so a base for critical appeal). If they want to give the film a ridiculously-low-for-Bond budget (say, I don't know, $75-$100 million?) and Boyle goes off and makes a spy thriller with as few action set pieces as and equal in scale to FRWL, and the film ends up being well-received on top of that, their ROI could be more than enough to justify it. A stretch, and risky, but interesting to speculate on.
    ToTheRight wrote: »
    peter wrote: »
    I'm re-reading John Pearson's authorized biography of Bond. It's quite a special portrait and expands on Fleming's idea of the man. I'd love Craig to read this before production, since it does give a charming glimpse into how an older Bond thinks of himself and his importance in this life of his. There are many enjoyable descriptions (as he orders his drinks and food-- someone who knows what he wants and he always gets what he wants; the idea that his true addiction is danger. He gets the most out of life when his life is at risk (he describes a skiing adventure he went on as a teen; from that moment forth, he was always chasing the same thrill of death-defying)...

    I'd like think Craig has probably read it at some point. That book was a good read as far as I remember. Been years. I can almost imagine at this point, Eon going for something like an adaptation of this book. Completely different and not the same old Bond.
    Considering Boyle has had his Bond idea since 2012, I feel pretty confident in assuming that B25 will not be an adaptation of YOLT, Risico, The Property of a Lady , etc.
    I feel cautiously optimistic. I am thrilled there's a different writer. P & W were no Maibaum, IMO.
    Has Boyle had his idea since 2012? I might have missed that. I saw something similar in the linked Daiymail (or equal rag and therefore likewise specious) article which said something to the effect that the seed was planted when Boyle worked with Craig on the opening ceremony short. I took that as meaning the idea of working together on a Bond film was planted, not that Boyle had had the idea specifically. In fact I thought the idea was rather last minute, hence Hodge punching out the script as we speak.
  • Posts: 11,285
    Strog wrote: »
    Cowley wrote: »
    Strog wrote: »
    He's saying all the right things as far as I'm concerned. I do like listening to him speak. I've posted this before so forgive me, I don't mean to beat everyone over the head with it, but it's likewise encouraging to me: Danny Boyle talks about a "Pixarification of movies"

    That interview is pretty encouraging if he can apply that approach to Bond. A bit of 70s grit and realism, where the violence resonates rather than just provides a cartoonish pop art fight sequence. Fleming's Bond certainly suffered out in the field and Craig would be a good Bond to bring out that side of the character on screen again.

    One can only hope the plot will be strong and compelling and Boyle brings a visceral reality back to the spy genre. I'm going to remain glass half full on this and hope we genuinely do get an entry in which the franchise is revitalised, Craig leaves on a high and we're back to thinking it's a shame he couldn't have done more...rather than the appetite to see the back of him which we seem to have now.
    Agreed. If Boyle wants to bring that 'violence with consequences' and 70s grit sensibility, I'm all for it. I think it'd be a fine thing for Craig's last film to veer nearer his initial couple rather than continue on the post-SF trajectory. That said, there are certain worries that would come with that like...
    bondjames wrote: »
    It's certainly encouraging, but I wonder if he will be able to combine that approach with a global audience of all ages which the Bond films aspire to.
    That's very true, and therein would lie the difficulty. It would be tough. I'm sure to some extent Barbara and Michael were having the same thoughts during the DAD->CR transition (although as you point out that sort of realism was then a box office driver and would have been perhaps less risky than now).

    But this will be a Bond film after all (and so there's automatically going to be box office interest), and it's Boyle (and so a base for critical appeal). If they want to give the film a ridiculously-low-for-Bond budget (say, I don't know, $75-$100 million?) and Boyle goes off and makes a spy thriller with as few action set pieces as and equal in scale to FRWL, and the film ends up being well-received on top of that, their ROI could be more than enough to justify it. A stretch, and risky, but interesting to speculate on.
    ToTheRight wrote: »
    peter wrote: »
    I'm re-reading John Pearson's authorized biography of Bond. It's quite a special portrait and expands on Fleming's idea of the man. I'd love Craig to read this before production, since it does give a charming glimpse into how an older Bond thinks of himself and his importance in this life of his. There are many enjoyable descriptions (as he orders his drinks and food-- someone who knows what he wants and he always gets what he wants; the idea that his true addiction is danger. He gets the most out of life when his life is at risk (he describes a skiing adventure he went on as a teen; from that moment forth, he was always chasing the same thrill of death-defying)...

    I'd like think Craig has probably read it at some point. That book was a good read as far as I remember. Been years. I can almost imagine at this point, Eon going for something like an adaptation of this book. Completely different and not the same old Bond.
    Considering Boyle has had his Bond idea since 2012, I feel pretty confident in assuming that B25 will not be an adaptation of YOLT, Risico, The Property of a Lady , etc.
    I feel cautiously optimistic. I am thrilled there's a different writer. P & W were no Maibaum, IMO.
    Has Boyle had his idea since 2012? I might have missed that. I saw something similar in the linked Daiymail (or equal rag and therefore likewise specious) article which said something to the effect that the seed was planted when Boyle worked with Craig on the opening ceremony short. I took that as meaning the idea of working together on a Bond film was planted, not that Boyle had had the idea specifically. In fact I thought the idea was rather last minute, hence Hodge punching out the script as we speak.

    Could be I misinterpreted the article. Perhaps he has only come up with his story idea recently?
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