True Detective (2014 - present)

edited July 2014 in General Movies & TV Posts: 315
There is a new 8 episode series which just started on HBO. It's 'True Detective' and stars Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson and is an anthology style, which is great. Thru the 2 episodes so far, they've taken their time developing characters and relaying the stories. The story is set in the U.S. in Louisiana, which makes for stark backgrounds in many ways. It's initial airing is on Sunday nights, followed by 'Sherlock' on PBS. Two hours well spent.
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Comments

  • doubleoegodoubleoego #LightWork
    Posts: 11,090
    Daddario in the second episode....good Lord, what a body!
  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe Still waiting for the Jena Malone Batwoman movie that's never going to be made.Moderator
    Posts: 11,760
    She has striking eyes.

    936fullalexandradaddariq.jpg

    Just imagine if she were cast opposite Alexis Bledel in a film...

    image_47dccea83.jpg
  • doubleoegodoubleoego #LightWork
    Posts: 11,090
    You were looking at her eyes??? Lol!!
  • Posts: 315
    doubleoego wrote:
    Daddario in the second episode....good Lord, what a body!

    A very up-lifting performance.
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded Dancing at midnight under the BeBop Moon
    edited June 2014 Posts: 11,756
    OK, folks, I thought we had a thread on this show.
    It seems, however, that some people had ... distractions ... while watching the show. ;)

    z15565049Q,Matthew-McConaughey-i-Woody-Harrelson-w--Detektywi.jpg

    I just wanted to comment because I finished watching all the episodes and all I can say is that was truly some of the finest acting and storytelling I have ever seen on television. This show was beyond outstanding. The pacing, camera work, direction were so different, refreshing, intriguing, and memorable. And the acting! I really cannot find high enough accolades for this series. If you have not seen it, do yourself a favor and watch it. It unravels for you like the softest silk scarf. This show takes its time and it feels all the more real because of it. Excellent writing. Fantastic cast all around. Mcconaughey is beyond perfect, really sublime in his role. Woody Harrelson has never struck me as a fine dramatic actor before, but he delivers, too.

    I am really looking forward to the second season, even knowing that this season 1 is complete and the actors will not return, not will any stories in the future overlap. Different director, too. I just hope they keep the originality and quality. It was quite an interesting and enjoyable journey, this show.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 28,231
    After being urged to watch this show by my best friend as well as @4EverBonded and @Creasy47, I took the plunge and watched this show start to finish.

    Having run through all eight episodes I couldn't help but say to myself at the end "that's it?" Granted, the writing is very good when it comes to dialogue and how the characters are presented, challenged and transformed by the events around them, and the plot while the very definition of a slow burner kept me decently invested enough to see it to the end. However, I still have to say I am underwhelmed looking back.

    The core mystery of the program is less important in hindsight to the lives of Rus and Marty, which is fine, but I wish more time and effort was paid to wrapping up the case. Even after finishing the show I have so many questions we never really got proper answers to after the rather rushed conclusion, and since we won't be seeing the characters or case referenced in the next season I am rather let down.

    The best things about the show are clearly Rus and Marty and the performances Matthew and Woody give respectively. The characters are treated with respect and given human flaws often, adding depth to them and making them come off as very real and relatable. The actors all give very naturalistic and often times deep and moving performances that feel very real, so that is also a feather in the show's cap. Other than Rus however, I found it hard to really like anyone, which isn't necessarily a bad thing or something that every show needs, but I more often than not found myself shaking my head at the vices and actions of all these characters. Rus wasn't perfect either, but at least he was interesting enough for me to forgive his wrongdoings and occasional jabs, and was able to relate to his cynical and glass half empty personality.

    The mystery is most compelling from the start (episodes 1 to 3), and sets aflame a lot of candles internally in your brain that I feel get no real payoff. I just wish more time was spent dissecting the killers and picking their brains to explain what the hell all the theatrics were for, as well as who was behind the taped sacrifice. Once again, I feel it's just a matter of the show scrambling too fast near the end to wrap up, leaving too many loose ends blowing in the wind in consequence.

    All in all I did like the show, but was I blown away to the level that so many told me I would be? Unfortunately, no. Maybe the show needs to sit with me for a few days as I think things over, or maybe not; who knows. I do, however, want to discuss this show with any that have seen it, so I'm game for any conversations dealing with the program from this point on. I like hearing what fresh eyes think of the show, and maybe further discussions will help me like the show a bit more or see things I hadn't appreciated quite as much before.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 33,990
    What questions did you have, Brady?
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded Dancing at midnight under the BeBop Moon
    edited July 2014 Posts: 11,756
    First, I'd like to point out that from here on in this thread there are LOTS OF SPOILERS and they are not hidden. So proceed only if you do not mind reading all the spoilers or have already watched all of this series.

    *******************************


    Sorry you were a bit let down, Brady. I never had a feeling the show was scrambling too fast at the end or rushed at all (unlike Penny Dreadful, which felt horribly crammed and skimmed over). I also felt the pacing was great throughout. It was definitely a character study rather than a true strongly compelling mystery.
    I did not feel there were loose ends or things left undone. So ... we have very different feelings about the series. What specifically do you feel you wanted more info on, by the end? I didn't feel like I had any questions and you have several, so I'm interested, too, along with Creasy47, as to what you'd like to know more about or have answers to.

    When I first heard about the show, I thought it was overhyped - but it wasn't for me. It really lived up to, and actually exceeded my expectations. So I'd like to discuss it a bit, with your particulars, if you have some time.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    edited July 2014 Posts: 33,990
    Agreed, @4EverBonded. I thought it moved along nicely, and when I sat down to watch it, I found myself becoming more and more interested with what happened between Rust and Marty and how their relationship deteriorated than I was with finding out what happens in the end. Don't get me wrong, the mystery was still interesting to me, but the slow-burning character study and the excellent dialogue had me hooked from the beginning.

    Also, I enjoyed that we got a snippet of who the killer was before the end. I was glad it wasn't a main character, but I was also happy that it wasn't some Joe Schmo who we had yet to see.

    As for questions, he asked who was behind the sacrificial video, and while we may not know who filmed it or who the Five Horsemen were, didn't Rust say he broke into Tuttle's places and found that hidden in a safe? I can only assume Tuttle (rich and powerful) was one of them, so with that, I'm assuming the other men who were initially part of the cult/engaging in the rapes/murders/sacrifices like the one that was hinted at in the video are just like him: rich and powerful, protected by the law and other higher-ups. If they showed us, it wouldn't leave an impact because we have no idea who they are, but it can be inferred that they were most certainly powerful men with connections.

    The only question I can think of off the top of my head that wasn't answered was who the new victim was that first inspired Gilbough and Papania to bring Rust and Cohle back in. Was she someone involved in the schooling long ago? Just a random victim? It doesn't ruin my interest in the show or bother me, but I am curious.

    I am sorry that it wasn't as great as you heard, though, Brady. I hate hearing about something being so good, and I finally sit down to watch it with bells on, and it doesn't manage to deliver like I had hoped. The show blew me away, but I suppose it isn't to everyone's liking.

    Also, Woody Harrelson has one major problem with a guy mowing another guy's lawn:

  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    edited July 2014 Posts: 28,231
    Creasy47 wrote:
    What questions did you have, Brady?

    Most of my questions just revolve around the killer/s and their connections to the church, really.

    I wanted more explanation for what drove the killers to do what they did. We don't find out a lot of the connections the killers have to the Tuttles, or how Ed Tuttle died precisely since the killer is dealt with so quickly. Because of that we are also robbed of an analysis of Errol and his friend, as well as why they killed in the first place, and how much, if at all they were connected to Tuttle and the killings of the Five Horsemen.

    Since there would have to be at least 6 people involved in the child sacrifice seen in the video (one to film it, five to do the actual killing) that means many more people were involved that we never even get information on. The conclusion to the show isn't really a conclusion at all since the boys only caught three men while possible dozens of other monsters are still be out there. I think it is alluded to that the group who did the child sacrifices all died by 2012 (the story's present day time period), but since we have no idea who the members are we can't actually be sure about that. There is even evidence that the killing of the school girl by the Horsemen was committed by just Tuttle and his five associates (whoever they may be) and the killings by Errol and his boys were entirely separate, though they used the same religious iconography like antlers/crowns in their killings. It would have been nice to discover the purpose of these killings and why church members (likely) did them.

    It all comes down to explanation. There's just so many loose ends, like why Errol was called the Yellow King, for example, that are left by the wayside.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    edited July 2014 Posts: 33,990
    I believe it's stated that the Childress family is just a spawn of bastards of the Tuttle family.

    Also, it's never stated that Errol was 'the Yellow King.' I think Sam Tuttle was the Yellow King. He was the ringleader of sorts and was the one who started the ritualistic rapes and murders. He just passed it down through his family, and it was obviously a name that carried weight, so I don't think Errol would've earned something like that when he was just as nasty - if not a bit more - as the rest of his family. I say the name goes to the ringleader: Errol's grandfather, Sam Tuttle.

    I think I prefer the ambiguity. I think most of the right questions were answered, and that made me happy. I don't need the answers force-fed to me, and while I do enjoy something that makes me think or ponder questions or theories, I suppose there is a difference between that and not flat-out getting an answer, and this show tackled all three: answering questions, leaving them ambiguous, and just not tackling them altogether at the end, but I did enjoy the ambiguity that was left. There were quite a few questions left unanswered, but it doesn't bother me: how did Errol get the scars? What did the spiral drawing mean, and why was there one in Marty's kitchen? And the most important: does Rust know he has an upstairs? ;-)

    You know another thing about the show that took me forever to figure out what it was, but when I did, I realized how genius the whole concept was and just how well it fit Rust? His eye mirror in the house. That was well done. It speaks leagues about Rust's philosophy on life.
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded Dancing at midnight under the BeBop Moon
    edited July 2014 Posts: 11,756
    For me, it seemed like what was uncovered was a sick, pedophilic family whose influence in the community grew and it all became a twisted, evil "club" of sorts. Yes, Creasy it went way back in the Tuttles clan. I didn't feel the need to know how many people were involved, why the head was called the Yellow King, or if it was truly some sort of ritualized spiritual belief ... I guess because I wasn't feeling compelled like I would with a different kind of mystery story. It all seemed to be a fake "church" if that.

    My take is that it was a secret society that involved people of all levels of power and through generations of families in that part of the country. It evolved and became more elaborate over the decades, and ritualized including masks to keep members hidden. I drew the conclusion that many others were involved and perhaps Rust and Marty caught the main serial killer of the bunch but it was widespread. There was a comment at the hospital about that, now that I think of it. Rust was saying how they didn't catch all of them and Marty said, no but "we got ours." Which I took to mean they did the best they could and did catch that serial killer and they should move on with their lives. There are still monsters out there, though; yes.

    But it is not getting still swept under the rug. Nope - now the regular police department is on that, to follow up. Rust and Marty broke the case for them, but they are both now getting on with their lives, broken as their lives may have been. Because this felt like that particular serial killer was caught, and the police were now actively knowing what to look for and go out and continue to finish it without Rust and Marty, I was not curious about any further details; I felt like the rest would resolve because of this turning point that Rust and Marty had finally achieved. And more than anything this was the story and character study of those two men throughout the years, so it did not bug me like puzzling out a different kind of detective catching a killer story may have.

    I really loved the ending, the light vs. the dark and Rust's final words which showed so much depth and a new direction for him.
  • Posts: 19,339
    I loved this series and thought the 2 main leads really put their all into it..from what i have heard there is to be a 2nd series,but it will be a new story with different actors.
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded Dancing at midnight under the BeBop Moon
    Posts: 11,756
    Yes it will be new cast, new place (California) totally different characters but I believe the same writer. :)
  • Posts: 19,339
    I hope it will be a good lead actor or 2,as they were brilliant.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 28,231
    @Creasy, I'd love to hear what you make of the mirror, as it no doubt has many interpretations because of Rus's complex character/personality. I read that the mirror is actually a meditation object that Matthew himself brought to set to deepen Rus's character and add another layer to who he was, which is really cool.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 33,990
    That is indeed true. I see it being involved with the saying "the eyes are the windows to the soul." Rust is such a deeply psychological, philosophical person that he doesn't need a mirror to check his appearance or see his entirety before he goes out the door. He has one tiny eye mirror that he uses to stare directly into himself, right into his soul, because that's what he always seems to preach on about. That's what I think it's for.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 28,231
    Creasy47 wrote:
    That is indeed true. I see it being involved with the saying "the eyes are the windows to the soul." Rust is such a deeply psychological, philosophical person that he doesn't need a mirror to check his appearance or see his entirety before he goes out the door. He has one tiny eye mirror that he uses to stare directly into himself, right into his soul, because that's what he always seems to preach on about. That's what I think it's for.

    Interesting. You could also say that he is more concerned with the state of his inner "soul" than his outward, individualistic appearance. I think it could also connect to the light and dark concept, and how we have both inside all of us. If Errol, for instance, looked into the mirror he'd see just what Rus does, an eye, and wouldn't see his scars or other recognizable features that some would judge him for. I think that could connect to Rus's idea that humanity shouldn't strive to be individualistic.

    Someone on Reddit commented how Marty's inability to truly understand the true purpose of the mirror or understand its meaning for Rus underlines his own ability to shy away from examining himself, especially his soul. While Rus often is very out in the open about himself and his introspective thoughts on life, Marty seems the type to block those out and simply enjoy life unencumbered by dark pondering. Kind of like how Rus literally takes his work home with him, while Marty doesn't want to see another dead body or crime scene after his shift is over. In fact, it's his inability to stomach human kind's evils that causes him to stop being a policeman and start his own private company in the first place.

    As for me, I don't really know how I stand on the mirror, but it does fascinate me. I'm not a spiritual person in the slightest, but I can see how some would get a meditative effect from staring at their "souls." I do think there is something to Marty's comment about not seeing both eyes at once, though. The mirror gives you the inability to completely stare at your entire self, and stops you from judging features of yourself that you may not like, or the flaws in others that stare into it. All you see is an eye, intensely reflected back to you that while unique in some ways is common to us all. That could again feed into the idea that good and evil are the same, and that both live in all of us. The mirror could be Rus's way of acquainting himself with the darkness of man, which he no doubt views himself as, which would explain why he can so easily spot those weaknesses in others. Definitely a fascinating man and my favorite part of the series.

    Plus, the opening song and title designs were beyond brilliant. They set up the atmosphere and tone of the show's foreboding, ominous dread perfectly.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    edited July 2014 Posts: 33,990
    Agreed, they're both great partners when they get to it, but they're also on opposite sides of the spectrum: while Marty uses other women to take his mind off of work - destroying his family in the process - Rust never stops working. Even when Marty manages to get him out, like the scene at the bar where he is set up with Marty's wife's friend, work is still on his mind.

    Also, while Rust has a very nice sense of attire, you're right, he's more focused on who he is on the inside, spouting off his intense, different ideals and views, than he is about how his house or his car looks. It's why he never even bothers to fix his truck's taillight after 2002...though I'm surprised he never got pulled over and ordered to get it fixed, seeing how it's illegal. ;-)

    You can even see how much Marty tries to deter him from talking like that when he brings up darker, deeper thoughts on life and reality and how anti-religious he is. It's a very unique blend, as Rust seems to be the fish out of water in their town.

    With the mirror, it just boils down (for me, anyway) to Rust only caring about remaining sharp and edgy and keeping his eye on who he is and what he believes. That's all he wants to retain. He doesn't care about his hair or how well groomed he is or any of it, he just wants to keep his sanity and hold on to all of his ideals.

    And yes, that opening title/song is amazing. So eerie, catchy, everything about it was perfect.

    Also, here is some slight, slight update on season two:

    http://www.slashfilm.com/william-friedkin-true-detective-season-2/
  • Posts: 2,341
    I understand that the first season is on DVD. I do not subscrbe to any premium channels. I will have to rent the discs and give it a look-see.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 28,231
    Creasy47 wrote:
    Agreed, they're both great partners when they get to it, but they're also on opposite sides of the spectrum: while Marty uses other women to take his mind off of work - destroying his family in the process - Rust never stops working. Even when Marty manages to get him out, like the scene at the bar where he is set up with Marty's wife's friend, work is still on his mind.

    Also, while Rust has a very nice sense of attire, you're right, he's more focused on who he is on the inside, spouting off his intense, different ideals and views, than he is about how his house or his car looks. It's why he never even bothers to fix his truck's taillight after 2002...though I'm surprised he never got pulled over and ordered to get it fixed, seeing how it's illegal. ;-)

    You can even see how much Marty tries to deter him from talking like that when he brings up darker, deeper thoughts on life and reality and how anti-religious he is. It's a very unique blend, as Rust seems to be the fish out of water in their town.

    With the mirror, it just boils down (for me, anyway) to Rust only caring about remaining sharp and edgy and keeping his eye on who he is and what he believes. That's all he wants to retain. He doesn't care about his hair or how well groomed he is or any of it, he just wants to keep his sanity and hold on to all of his ideals.

    And yes, that opening title/song is amazing. So eerie, catchy, everything about it was perfect.

    Also, here is some slight, slight update on season two:

    http://www.slashfilm.com/william-friedkin-true-detective-season-2/
    Yes, the taillight still remaining unfixed for a decade was interesting for me to, and something the director made very evident in the close up shot. I think you are right about how Rus's disinterest in fixing it connects to his equal disinterest in his outer self, and I also like to think that he kept the taillight shattered because he was reminding himself of how dangerous he can be. He just smashes Marty into the back of the truck with a crazy ferocity during that fight, and by leaving the light unfixed I think he is always reminding himself that he needs to have limitations set for himself so he doesn't get a hot head and do something that could ruin his life or hurt someone, in that case Marty. He has the capability to step over a line and kill a man, even if on accident, and I think that because he is a cynic he realizes how corrosive he can be and worries for the safety of those around him. He knows he can get a hot head and do dangerous things, and for that reason I think he likes to be alone because being solitarily confined in his home means nobody has to deal with his dark thoughts and speeches and end up getting hurt.

    Rus is a very complicated and broken man, but he is definitely considerate of others and often goes out of his way to keep his suffering to himself where he won't bug others. The good thing about Marty is that he sort of brings out in him a sense of open responsiveness that he likely never finds because he is so intent on hiding away in his home and "locked room"/mind. While most people around Rus probably just try to ignore or drown out his dark speeches on the pointlessness of life and the errors in evolution and write it off as crazy bullshit, Marty calls him on it all and challenges his beliefs in genuine discussions. Their police car quickly goes from being a place of "silent reflection" to a talking box for both men to get on each others' nerves and through that, they discover new things about themselves and open their eyes to opposing views. They are a very compelling partnership. They couldn't be more separate in their religious views and feelings about life, yet at the same time they share the same flaws, putting on masks to get through their lives.

    For Rus I think he hides behind his cynicism and sense of solitude so that he doesn't have to face the kind of things that torture him like his daughter's death, just as his undercover work allowed him to get a break from his miserable self and play a part so unlike who he was. For Marty the mask he puts on is that of a good husband and provider. While he thinks he is doing the right thing while having these affairs to take the edge off of his work related stress, he is actually separating himself further and further from the openness and trust that all marriages and families should be founded upon. He seems to have a natural desire, as Rus says for the bad girls that are a bit crazy and wild, and he may just be using the job and its horrors as an excuse to justify his infidelity which he seems addicted to.

    As expected, writing my thoughts out and having discourse with others about the show has helped point out things I really enjoyed about it and it has made me see that I liked it more than I thought I did at first. So thanks for these talks, @Creasy, and all the others I will be talking with about this show in the future.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 33,990
    Rust is most certainly an unhinged man. The way he talks, the stand-offish attitude he presents on and off the clock, the way his apartment and truck don't matter to him, all of it. He can unleash those demons he houses inside when he needs to. It's interesting watching him keep his cool every time Marty gets in his face: when he accuses him of having sex with another girl in the locker room, when he gets in Rust's face about doing the paperwork, when Marty loses his mind when Rust comes over and mows the lawn, etc. We only see him truly unleash when the time is right (like saving the day in the finale) or in self defense/when it pertains to the job (during the beautiful, beautiful long take in the neighborhood raid scene, or when Marty finally attacks him in 2002.)

    Another little curious tidbit: why did Rust borrow Marty's lawn mower in the first place? He lives in an apartment, he couldn't have anything to mow!

    You're quite welcome for the talks, feel free to keep on or ask anymore questions. I'm glad this is helping you appreciate it a little more. Sometimes that's what it takes for me: I don't see the appeal in something, yet when I talk about it with someone or I let it sit for a few days, it grows on me more and more; sometimes by a little bit, sometimes by a lot.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 28,231
    Creasy47 wrote:
    Rust is most certainly an unhinged man. The way he talks, the stand-offish attitude he presents on and off the clock, the way his apartment and truck don't matter to him, all of it. He can unleash those demons he houses inside when he needs to. It's interesting watching him keep his cool every time Marty gets in his face: when he accuses him of having sex with another girl in the locker room, when he gets in Rust's face about doing the paperwork, when Marty loses his mind when Rust comes over and mows the lawn, etc. We only see him truly unleash when the time is right (like saving the day in the finale) or in self defense/when it pertains to the job (during the beautiful, beautiful long take in the neighborhood raid scene, or when Marty finally attacks him in 2002.)

    Another little curious tidbit: why did Rust borrow Marty's lawn mower in the first place? He lives in an apartment, he couldn't have anything to mow!

    You're quite welcome for the talks, feel free to keep on or ask anymore questions. I'm glad this is helping you appreciate it a little more. Sometimes that's what it takes for me: I don't see the appeal in something, yet when I talk about it with someone or I let it sit for a few days, it grows on me more and more; sometimes by a little bit, sometimes by a lot.

    I'm not sure about the lawn mower, but the fact that Marty got so worked up over Rus doing his lawn is telling about him personally. Marty seems to be a man who is very concerned with male pride and being a provider. His family is his, his home is his and all the possessions in his name are his, and if anyone is going to step in and use/take what's his, he goes nuts. This reflects in a lot of his actions too, and that reveals how Nixonian he is. By Nixonian, I mean he has a "I can do anything I want, but you all can't" attitude when it comes to his family. When he knows his daughter is being promiscuous he openly assaults the boys she got with (very protective dad), and when Maggie (rather classlessly) drops the bomb that she fooled around with Rus, his manhood is put into question and he feels insulted, hence his nasty fight with his partner. He seems to have a high tolerance for his own vices, mainly infidelity, but can't stand the sins of others, especially when it comes to his wife and children. As Rus said often, he is a man in denial, and "people incapable of guilt usually do have a good time," as he says early on in the show. Rus always gives Marty a hard time for his wrongdoings, which after a time I think helped him realize how bad his behavior was. I do think that after a while Marty realizes what he is doing is wrong, but the temptation to step out and get wild seems ingrained in his natural human make-up and he just can't resist it.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    edited July 2014 Posts: 33,990
    At first I thought Marty was mad that Rust was at his house, so he made up the grass mowing bit to have something else to be angry at, instead of looking foolish for being jealous that he was in his kitchen when he wasn't there, but I agree, what's his is his, and even something as simple as doing a favor with his own property stretches beyond that and angers him.

    As for the scene with the boys in the jail cell, I think that wasn't so much of him protecting his daughter because she was at the age of learning about sex and engaging in it as it was the fact that she was underage and the boys were 19, and it was technically illegal. Marty gets by with sleeping around because he says it's done for the good of the family and to keep his head straight, but when he does it for the second time and his wife sleeps with Rust, which - like you said - she throws in his face as he wasn't as good a lover as Rusty was, that's what sets him over the edge. It's quite hypocritical of him.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 28,231
    Creasy47 wrote:
    At first I thought Marty was mad that Rust was at his house, so he made up the grass mowing bit to have something else to be angry at, instead of looking foolish for being jealous that he was in his kitchen when he wasn't there, but I agree, what's his is his, and even something as simple as doing a favor with his own property stretches beyond that and angers him.

    As for the scene with the boys in the jail cell, I think that wasn't so much of him protecting his daughter because she was at the age of learning about sex and engaging in it as it was the fact that she was underage and the boys were 19, and it was technically illegal. Marty gets by with sleeping around because he says it's done for the good of the family and to keep his head straight, but when he does it for the second time and his wife sleeps with Rust, which - like you said - she throws in his face as he wasn't as good a lover as Rusty was, that's what sets him over the edge. It's quite hypocritical of him.

    I also thought that he could be upset that Rus was in his home with his wife unannounced and he expected something had gone on, so he made up the mowing story like you said to vent his anger in a passive aggressive manner. The great thing about the show is that so much of it is interpretive.

    As for Marty's assault of the boys, he no doubt was making sure they never did that to another girl ever again by hitting them, but I also feel like his own anger at what they did with his "little girl" drove him to really give it to them on top of that lesson. And I'm pretty sure they never did such a thing again after that encounter.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 33,990
    He walked in, and even though the kids were there, Marty was in a wifebeater and looking sweaty. Guys look into things like that too much, so he could've completely misconstrued the situation. He had an attitude as soon as he arrived home and noticed Rust was there while he wasn't. It could just be that he's so protective and jealous that he doesn't want his wife having any form of male interaction with another man, even though he's cheating on her. I also love the interpretation, so many actions and scenarios, no matter how tiny, can be seen in so many different ways. The thing that gets me about Marty screwing up and sleeping around the second time is that he sleeps with the girl that he once helped: you know, the underage girl selling her body in a dilapidated, disgusting trailer park.

    Yeah, knowing Marty, I bet that their age was irrelevant and he was going to exert his police power in any way to get to them and hurt them. Whether they were her age or not, he was disgusted at the thought of it and wanted to teach them a lesson.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 28,231
    Creasy47 wrote:
    He walked in, and even though the kids were there, Marty was in a wifebeater and looking sweaty. Guys look into things like that too much, so he could've completely misconstrued the situation. He had an attitude as soon as he arrived home and noticed Rust was there while he wasn't. It could just be that he's so protective and jealous that he doesn't want his wife having any form of male interaction with another man, even though he's cheating on her. I also love the interpretation, so many actions and scenarios, no matter how tiny, can be seen in so many different ways. The thing that gets me about Marty screwing up and sleeping around the second time is that he sleeps with the girl that he once helped: you know, the underage girl selling her body in a dilapidated, disgusting trailer park.

    Yeah, knowing Marty, I bet that their age was irrelevant and he was going to exert his police power in any way to get to them and hurt them. Whether they were her age or not, he was disgusted at the thought of it and wanted to teach them a lesson.

    Maybe Marty simply used the mowing as a metaphor for infidelity. His lawn (wife) was his to mow (satisfy), and he never wanted to see Rust mowing (wink wink) around his property. ;)
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 33,990
    I like that! That's a damn good theory. It would've been something that Rust would've immediately caught onto, as well. Just another moment, though, where Rust lets Marty say his peace before he leaves. He doesn't get angry, he doesn't hit him, he just departs with a small quip of some sort.
  • Posts: 7,628
    I really tried watching this show but fell asleep both times. Will pass on the chance of trying a 3rd time.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 33,990
    SaintMark wrote:
    I really tried watching this show but fell asleep both times. Will pass on the chance of trying a 3rd time.

    Shame to hear that. Like I said, though, I suppose it's not for everyone.
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