Last Movie you Watched?

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  • Posts: 10,274
    Lolita (1962). The fact that this film is lower-tier Kubrick is just amazing, because it’s still a very good film all around. Great stuff.
  • Lancaster007Lancaster007 Shrublands Health Clinic, England
    Posts: 1,874
    Strog wrote: »
    Ready Player One (2018)

    Fantastic film, very fun, very fast paced, extremely entertaining actions sequences - the 1st major one at around the 20 minutes mark is one huge car chase that features King Kong, the DeLorean, a Dinosaur and the motorcycle from 'Akira' - and the CGI world created whenever the film dives into the Oasis (the virtual world central to the plot) are are amazing to see. A killer soundtrack (Depeche Mode, A-Ha), a very cool James Bond reference when the N64 game 'Goldeneye 007' is mentioned, and of course some very charismatic performances from the lead cast - especially the 2 asian characters and Ben Mendelsohn (who is born to play very slimy yet terribly entertaining villains). I had a blast for the entire 2 hours and 20 minutes, and it'll most likely finish the year near the top of the most fun time I'll have in theaters. One of my favorite Spielberg's too, I'll have to see where it ranks once I rewatch it, but I think it'll be very high on my list.
    This is encouraging to hear. It's been a while since a new one from him has been top tier for me.

    ? The Post was only a couple of months ago!
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,107
    FoxRox wrote: »
    Lolita (1962). The fact that this film is lower-tier Kubrick is just amazing, because it’s still a very good film all around. Great stuff.

    Fantastic film, and what a performance by Mason.
  • TheWizardOfIceTheWizardOfIce 'One of the Internet's more toxic individuals'
    edited March 2018 Posts: 9,117
    Revelator wrote: »
    There was another HoTB playing the other day on the tellybox, starring Richard Roxborough (or did I miss that in you review?) and then of course there is Sherlock series 2 episode The Hounds of Baskerville as well.

    No, you're correct, I didn't review the Roxborough version. Everything I read about it put me off. I plan on seeing the Sherlock version someday, but since it's very far from being a traditional adaptation I decided it wouldn't be fair to review it as one.
    Wouldn't bother it's mediocre at best and very forgettable but I suppose if you want to be a completist about these things then give it a whirl.

    I went to see Red Sparrow the other day and despite some very mixed reviews had a great time.

    A lot was made of Jennifer Lawrence getting her kit off and if that's your reason for going you will be severely disappointed as in 2hrs 20 mins you get a few quick flashes. But I found it a very enjoyable thriller that hit all the Cold War beats you wanted it to. Charlotte Rampling and Jeremey Irons have a lot of fun hamming it up and there are some nice bursts of violence although overall I was somewhat disappointed that it was a bit superficial in terms of character. Had the potential to be up there with Tinker, Tailor but the script lacked the heft required.

    Also they should have had the bottle to really go for it sex and violence wise as things were a tad muted for my liking, which seemed like a corporate decision to try and get as many bums on seats rather than being true to the project and subject matter.

    But overall as the new Cold War starts to heat was this film made it feel like the Soviet Union is still in it's pomp (which after all is Putin's aspiration) so hopefully we are on the crest of a new wave of Cold War thriller revival.
  • ClarkDevlinClarkDevlin Martinis, Girls and Guns
    edited March 2018 Posts: 15,423
    I've been on a Spaghetti Western spree lately, starting with five of my favourites and continuing with two more I haven't seen before, plus one I've seen last year afterwards. One thing is for certain, though. Imitations (like many Italian films cashing in on the success of a cultural phenomenon like The Dollars Trilogy) however do stand out as nothing short of copycats not ambitious enough to tell a compelling story but visually satisfying the audience more or less.

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    1. A Fistful of Dollars (1964):
    Known as the one to start it all for the genre, Sergio Leone had a great vision to reinvigorate how people have viewed Westerns by introducing a hero who's not slight bit of a white knight as opposed to what the John Wayne films did in the preceding years. Fresh out of the production of Rawhide, Clint Eastwood changes his image of a boy scout to a rogue antihero with morals falling in the grey area. A charismatic gunman who hardly lives for the moment but observes and plans ahead to manipulate two opposing forces that terrorize and emasculate a poor town, into fighting and eliminating each other, thus freeing the townspeople from the regime of the two gangs.

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    2. For A Few Dollars More (1965):
    Even though it wasn't Leone's intention, this installment sees the return of The Man With No Name (played by Eastwood) with his famous poncho and rattlesnake-gripped Single Action Army pistol, who is now working as a bounty hunter, going after the most dangerous criminals wanted by the law. But, he's not alone. Soon thereafter, he is joined by the charismatic Colonel Douglas Mortimer (played by the ever as awesome late Lee Van Cleef) when the most ruthless gang leader then-currently known around, El Indio (Gian Maria Volonte) breaks out of imprisonment and plans to rob the largest and most secure bank ever in the US. Seeing as the gang all collectively is worth a fortune, the two heroes join forces to weaken the gang and eventually picking up the bounty money, unbeknownst to the Man with No Name, Mortimer seems to have his own agenda against El Indio.

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    3. Sabata (1969):
    Now, this film is nothing original or visionary, but pure fun starring Lee Van Cleef as the titular character, who is more or less inspired by the role he played in For A Few Dollars More, from his mannerisms right down to the last detail of his clothing. Unlike other western heroes, however, Sabata uses a custom-built dillinger as his primary sidearm, and is a very quick draw. Sabata is an unpredictable man whose game is not known to anyone but an untrustworthy ally called Banjo (played by William Berger) whose paths cross after a long time. Finding out about a bank robbery commissioned by a local nobleman with town officials being in his pocket, Sabata recovers an evidence that tails it back to the villains, he decides to blackmail them for money and his personal gain rather than turning them in, without crossing the line or breaking the law amidst. It's a terrific action-pack western which is recommended for the lovers of the genre.

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    4. The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (1966):
    The third and final entry in The Dollars Trilogy, this one is a prequel to its predecessors, taking place during the Civil War and serving as an almost origin story for The Man With No Name. This time, Sergio Leone's visionary direction takes the genre to a whole new level by telling a story uneasy to follow, at least not being as straightforward as the previous two, centering on three gunslingers who are after a large sum of gold. Untrusting of each other - and rightfully so - the three of them have to go through the greatest lengths to get to the gold buried in a cemetery far away. The film depicts the violence and the tragedy of war in many ways while not failing to be a western in the slightest. Cutting through opposing forces once more, whether the Yankees or the Confederates, or battlefields they've had to flee, the quest has all the men working with and against each other, ready to stick a knife in each other's back should the moment call for it. It's the ecstasy of gold. Lee Van Cleef returns in yet another prominent role, but this time playing a character that is the opposite of the romantic Colonel Mortimer. He is "The Bad", called in the film Angel Eyes, who doesn't fail to impress in any form. Compared to the other two, it's an epic that every man on earth should see, at least once.

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    5. Death Rides A Horse (1967):
    This one is one of my favourites. Undisputed. Then again, revenge stories are always beautiful if told magnificently. And this one, like For A Few Dollars More, is delivered in the same manner, but doesn't try to be ambitious. It's only there to entertain. Starring Lee Van Cleef once again as a hero, and John Phillip Law (of the Diabolik fame) as a young man seeking revenge for the abusive and violent death of his family, the two unconventional protagonists team up to go after members of a former gang who appear to be individually rich and respected men in their own towns while keeping in touch for certain robberies and smuggling business they undertake. Van Cleef's character used to be part of the gang, only to be betrayed by his comrades and locked away for fifteen years, now prompting his former colleagues for a payback. Law, on the other hand, wants all of their blood spilled to avenge his family in cold blood. Playing on the mentor and trainee template, it showcases compelling performances by the two lead actors, and - of course - the brilliant late Luigi Pistilli (who appeared in two of Dollars Trilogy films) in the role of the main antagonist, rising from a gang leader to a city mayor, while keeping up with his old habits. Recommended for western lovers.

    Trivia for Bond fans: Anthony Dawson has a role in this film.

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    6. If You Meet Sartana, Pray For Your Death (1968):
    Here, we step into the territory of the Spaghetti Western pastiches. This was the first time I've seen a Sartana film after having heard of its cult status among the fanatics of the genre. Here, we have Italian actor Gianni Garko in the eponymous role, whose character is an amalgamation of The Man With No Name (Clint Eastwood) and Colonel Mortimer (Lee Van Cleef). It's funny how these two characters appear to be the primary influences in then-future films in the category. I can't say I blame the producers. Even though, director Gianfranco Parolini (who is a massive Bond fan, by the way) claimed that the character was mostly inspired by Mandrake The Magician (due to his skillful agility with shuffling cards as well as wearing a caped overcoat with red interior) and James Bond (his gadgetry and custom-made dillinger pistol).

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    The film deals with Sartana, a man of utmost mystery, manipulating two different parties who are after a large sum of gold being smuggled through coffins, and there he comes to assume the role of a "first class pallbearer" as he puts it. We also have the rather enjoyable William Berger making appearance in the film as the primary antagonist whom Sartana terrorizes by hitting where it hurts most: The character is afraid of pocket watches that chime a specific tune. A long game of a cat and mouse ensues as all players, whether individuals, collective gangs or corrupt noble families, plan to get their hands on the gold and flee the town. But, when Sartana comes in the middle, the odds no longer appear to be in their favor.

    7. Sartana the Gravedigger (1969):
    The second installment in the Sartana Pentalogy has the protagonist framed for a notorious bank robbery with a big price on his head put by the law that forces hungry bounty hunters to come after him. While on his quest to clear his name, he learns that there's a bigger matter in hand than a simple frameup, as there happens to be someone impersonating him like a doppelganger who seemingly knows him best and is steps ahead. We have here a second appearance by Klaus Kinski whose role is larger here than it was in the first film. Being only his third time at the helm of a film, Giuliano Carnimeo does a terrific job in delivering an experience of excitement, and dare I say, improves upon its predecessor, which itself was enjoyable. It also has a catchy theme tune.

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    Note: The Sartana films aren't necessarily recommended for the general viewer. It's only for the Spaghetti Western fanatic who's a completist rather than someone who wants to watch an epic film. I'd also like to mention that the films haven't been released in remastered form, so I'd wait for Kino Lober to release it on BluRay with high definition quality and nothing but.

    8. The Grand Duel (1972):
    With this film, we're back to originality and quality-storytelling that use more experienced and professional actors with talents as well as a director who has a lot of vision invested in this one. It's less action-packed, more investigative with elements of Giallo (Italian-made horrors of sorts) playing in the shadows. It tells the story of a former Jefferson City Sheriff named Clayton (Van Cleef) going through the greatest lengths to exonerate a young man who was wrongfully accused and condemned of killing the patriarch of a rich and influential family in the west. The first half plays like a regular western, whereas the other half relies on the structure of a detective tale as the major players in a conspiracy plot come to reveal themselves. The supporting cast also has powerful actors with great presence, on top of all being Horst Frank, followed by Dominique Darel as an obligated bride to the family, and Klaus Grunberg playing a conflicted psychotic killer with thirst for blood. Luis Bacalov composed a beautiful theme tune for this film which I've gladly added to my collection of SW albums sometime ago.

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    You know? Watching all these Spaghetti Westerns and listening to their outstanding soundtracks... As much as I like Quentin Tarantino, I wish he would stop bastardizing those themes in his own respective films.

    Next stop: One Silver Dollar (1965) starring Giuliano Gemma.
  • Posts: 684
    Strog wrote: »
    Ready Player One (2018)

    Fantastic film, very fun, very fast paced, extremely entertaining actions sequences - the 1st major one at around the 20 minutes mark is one huge car chase that features King Kong, the DeLorean, a Dinosaur and the motorcycle from 'Akira' - and the CGI world created whenever the film dives into the Oasis (the virtual world central to the plot) are are amazing to see. A killer soundtrack (Depeche Mode, A-Ha), a very cool James Bond reference when the N64 game 'Goldeneye 007' is mentioned, and of course some very charismatic performances from the lead cast - especially the 2 asian characters and Ben Mendelsohn (who is born to play very slimy yet terribly entertaining villains). I had a blast for the entire 2 hours and 20 minutes, and it'll most likely finish the year near the top of the most fun time I'll have in theaters. One of my favorite Spielberg's too, I'll have to see where it ranks once I rewatch it, but I think it'll be very high on my list.
    This is encouraging to hear. It's been a while since a new one from him has been top tier for me.

    ? The Post was only a couple of months ago!
    THE POST was solid, but I can't say I found it to be among his best work.

    ---

    @ClarkDevlin Much less familiar with spaghetti westerns than I'd like. Of the ones you listed I've only seen the Dollars trilogy, A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS being my favorite. DEATH RIDES A HORSE sounds interesting, though, like it might be a good place to start expanding.
  • ClarkDevlinClarkDevlin Martinis, Girls and Guns
    Posts: 15,423
    @Strog, Death Rides A Horse is very good and among my favourites. Fifth on my Top 5 Spaghetti Westerns, to be precise. Ennio Morricone also composed the soundtrack for the film.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Hamburg, near the Atlantic Hotel
    edited March 2018 Posts: 5,942
    @ClarkDevlin: What do you think of ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST? It is definitely my favourite Leone movie (ahead of the entire Dollar Trilogy), with the Morricone score that made me a Morricone fan almost fifty years ago - though probably not with a real "Spaghetti Western" feeling, but rather transcending it for maybe the first time.

    EDIT: Just when I finished typing this, my sound system running soundtracks/scores set to "random" started playing THE EXTASY OF GOLD. Brilliant, brilliant anytime. It must be a sign.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Hamburg, near the Atlantic Hotel
    Posts: 5,942
    Just tonight: DREAMGIRLS (2006)

    I've had this Blu-ray since 2010 and always postponed but am happy to report that I watched and enjoyed it immensely tonight. Marvellous feel-good movie with beat-up music track and super performances by all involved. A sure re-watch much sooner than my first watch happened.
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 16,202
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    @ClarkDevlin: What do you think of ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST? It is definitely my favourite Leone movie (ahead of the entire Dollar Trilogy), with the Morricone score that made me a Morricone fan almost fifty years ago - though probably not with a real "Spaghetti Western" feeling, but rather transcending it for maybe the first time.

    EDIT: Just when I finished typing this, my sound system running soundtracks/scores set to "random" started playing THE EXTASY OF GOLD. Brilliant, brilliant anytime. It must be a sign.

    OUATITW is pure classic gold IMO.
  • ClarkDevlinClarkDevlin Martinis, Girls and Guns
    Posts: 15,423
    @j_w_pepper Once Upon A Time In The West is definitely a brilliant epic film, even more so than The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. Leone definitely had a vision in its storytelling, feeling inspired from a book that would later also become the basis for Once Upon A Time In America.

    It also features Charles Bronson is his first prominent role in a globally successful film after having appeared in numerous French films at the time. The thing is, the whole cast is perfect and their performances are outstanding. By label, it's definitely a Spaghetti Western. By feeling however, it's slightly different. Then again, so was The Good, The Bad and The Ugly and Duck, You Sucker! (aka A Fistful of Dynamites).

    I'll be watching them all along the way. Also, I forgot to mention... Man, this just happens by luck. Having recently watched the first two Sartana films, I only found out a few hours ago that Arrow Films announced a remaster of the whole Pentalogy!

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    https://arrowfilms.com/product-detail/the-complete-sartana-limited-edition/FCD1762

    Here's a clip for those interested:
  • Posts: 10,274
    Game Night (2018). Good stuff. Not a 10/10 masterpiece or anything but a really fun movie; I'd recommend it to anyone looking for a new comedy/thriller. A good story with good characters.
  • ClarkDevlinClarkDevlin Martinis, Girls and Guns
    edited March 2018 Posts: 15,423
    Spaghetti Western marathon, Film No. 9:

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    One Silver Dollar (1965):
    The sixties was a terrific decade for westerns, more so than anything that came before it. With the unexpectedly overwhelming success of A Fistful of Dollars a year earlier, the Italians started making westerns in their own way rather than imitating the American Westerns as they've done it before. Starring Giuliano Gemma under the stage moniker, Montgomery Wood, with all the other Italian cast members adopting generic American names in order to achieve success in the US market, here we see an outstanding western that doesn't get tiresome in the slightest.

    Giuliano Gemma plays Gary O'Hara, a former Confederate Lieutenant, who is betrayed and left for dead by a corrupt town official called McCory. Seeking justice and revenge for the death of his brother, O'Hara changes his appearance and identity to join up McCory's underlings who are terrorizing the entire state and stealing a shipment of gold belonging to the townspeople, and destroy the whole gang from within.

    The film does feel original, albeit not overtly ambitious. I rank it as good as A Fistful of Dollars as a whole. It's evident that the early-to-mid sixties always have had handled works of cinema more classically and romantically rather than what came later where it just turned to a cash cow business and spawned films in the genre no matter the quality. Gianni Ferrio's score also plays a large part in elevating this film's value with its haunting tone. If only this film gets remastered on BluRay. For western lovers of all kinds, I recommend this.
  • Posts: 4,583
    Kong : Skull Island

    Great movie all around. Too bad I didn't see it in the theater when it came out. Still, now it makes me more fired up for the next MCU movies, given that Loki, Carol Danvers and Nick Fury were in it ;) And the Kaiju lover I am got a kick out of the post-credit scene.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    Gerard wrote: »
    Kong : Skull Island

    Great movie all around. Too bad I didn't see it in the theater when it came out. Still, now it makes me more fired up for the next MCU movies, given that Loki, Carol Danvers and Nick Fury were in it ;) And the Kaiju lover I am got a kick out of the post-credit scene.
    One of my faves from 2017.
  • Posts: 7,628
    Unlocked (2017) - Noomi Rapace who does plays an interrogator/secret agent in a spy thriller by Micheal Apted in a thriller about Terrorism in England. With a decent twist in the general expectations. Wouldn't mind another installment.

    Jack Reacher: never go back - A decent second installment of this series in which Tom shows that he does seem to do a decent enough Reacher.

    The Mummy (2017) - I kinda enjoyed this actioner/dark universal movie, a nice enough retelling of the Mummy. Some great action scenes and Boutela is amazing.
  • Posts: 13,951
    Bridesmaids I was channel hopping at work noticed Kristen Wiig was in this, as she has been cast as Cheetah in Wonder Woman 2 I was curious to see her in a more serious role. The film itself is boring, Rose Byrne is also in this film which has made the film a little more bearable.
  • edited March 2018 Posts: 4,079
    Finding Forrester. Very good and touching film. Sean Connery is fantastic in the title role, as is newcomer Rob Brown, a most natural and engaging actor. They are well supported by F. Murray Abraham and Anna Paquin.

    A few thoughts:
    - I do wish there had been just a bit more insight into Forrester's past and his reasons for his become a recluse.

    - I appreciate how the film uses the subject of basketball to provide insight into the characters. Jamal uses it to fit in among his peers, but his mind is in fact focused on writing. On the other hand, because of Jamal's background, both the school directive and professor Crawford assume in a prejudicious way that he is is only interested in basketball.

    - Jamal does show quite a bit of character through the entire film. He keeps his promise of not mentioning Forrester in the face of expulsion, he openly challenges professor Crawford in the classroom for making a fool out of a fellow student, and he probably misses those basketball shots because he isn't willing to stay in the school for the wrong reasons.

    - A sad implication of the story, albeit one that, in my opinion, is only briefly explored in the film in an explicit way, is that Forrester's seclusion has not only prevented him from living his life to the fullest, but has also prevented his writings from being read by the world. We should all aspire to make the most out of our talents, and explore and appreciate the fruit of those of others. A wasted life is a tragic thing. This idea is reinforced through the ending of the film.

    - Even though the filmic medium and the need to keep the story going impose obvious restrictions, this movie manages to successfully convey plenty of the magic and the fascination of the written word as a means of discovery, expression and reflection about the human condition, also exemplifying how it can be a thing of beauty to bask in.

    - Seeing a spirited Forrester --once again in touch with the world, with himself and as he says, finally having been provided with the "gift of friendship"-- riding off in his bike, only to find out in the next scene that he has passed away makes for an unexpected (by me, at least) and touching ending. But seeing that he has finally written another novel, and conceded Jamal the honor of writing its foreword, gives the resolution of the story that touch of bittersweetness, that mixture of happiness and sadness that, if it's not presumptuous of me to say, seems to sum up in a nutshell the experience of living for us all.

    - I really miss seeing Sean Connery on the screen. An obvious thing to say probably, but he is a very good actor whose wonderful presence fills the screen.
  • BMW_with_missilesBMW_with_missiles All the usual refinements.
    edited March 2018 Posts: 2,988
    Ready Player One was fricking awesome and one of the best movies I've ever seen. I have nothing more I can say.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Hamburg, near the Atlantic Hotel
    Posts: 5,942
    Ready Player One was fricking awesome and one of the best movies I've ever seen. I have nothing more I can say.
    Once you find you can say something more again, @BMW_with_missiles, can you tell me if I'd enjoy that film although I literally never ever played a computer game (beyond Tetris and FreeCell)? I mean, I never saw a Spielberg film I didn't like - but would I understand this one? It just seems like an alien universe to me.
  • Posts: 10,274
    Ready Player One was fricking awesome and one of the best movies I've ever seen. I have nothing more I can say.

    Wow. Hype.
  • Posts: 2,105
    Victor Frankenstein
    Rat Pack
    The Cell
    Anaconda
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,107
    Really loved THE CELL when it came out, but it has dated badly. A remake is coming. Cautiously optimistic.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    edited March 2018 Posts: 18,983
    PACIFIC RIM

    and

    PACIFIC RIM UPRISING

    I'm still not sure why they didn't just flat-out adapt the Japanese anime NEON GENESIS EVANGELION but I guess meccha fans will enjoy PACIFIC RIM. I can have fun with these films despite their noise and lack of great story. ;)
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,107
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    PACIFIC RIM

    and

    PACIFIC RIM UPRISING

    I'm still not sure why they didn't just flat-out adapt the Japanese anime NEON GENESIS EVANGELION but I guess meccha fans will enjoy PACIFIC RIM. I can enjoy these films for all its noise and lack of great story. These are not that kind of movies anyway. ;)

    I loved the first, but haven t bothered seeing the second.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 18,983
    It's not bad. But you must meet it on its own terms. It's loud, jolting and messy overall.
  • Artemis81Artemis81 In Christmas Land
    Posts: 543
    MARVEL CINEMATIC RETROSPECTIVE

    Ant-Man_poster.jpg

    A fun little movie. I remember having a good time with it when I saw it back in 2015. The cast all around was likable, and good in the roles they've been given. The action was very solid, really like the shrinking/unshrinking fights and the one with Falcon was definitely awesome and lots of fun. Darren Cross was menacing and I thought the Yellowjacket suit looked cool. Only two things bothered me. One, adding HYDRA in this film seemed a little forced. I know it was only for a small part, but I would have bought Cross selling his tech to some shady part of the government or foreign nationals. Second, how did Cross know what Pym's plan was or that Lange was working with him? I feel that it wasn't explained and it sort of came out of the blue. Overall, It was solid movie all around. It was hard to decided whether I liked this movie better than The First Avenger, but I guess it can be tie. Hopefully by the time I get to the last movie, I can look back at those ties and see if I can spread them a bit more or not...

    Rankings:
    1. Captain America: The Winter Soldier
    2. Avengers
    3. Iron Man
    4. Guardians of the Galaxy
    5. Captain America: The First Avenger, Ant-Man
    6. Avengers: Age of Ultron
    7. The Incredible Hulk, Thor, Iron Man 3
    10. Black Panther
    11. Iron Man 2
    12. Thor: The Dark World
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,107
    Ant-Man is one of my favourite Marvel movies.
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 16,202
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    PACIFIC RIM

    and

    PACIFIC RIM UPRISING

    I'm still not sure why they didn't just flat-out adapt the Japanese anime NEON GENESIS EVANGELION but I guess meccha fans will enjoy PACIFIC RIM. I can have fun with these films despite their noise and lack of great story. ;)

    No desire to see the second film. But I will probably rent it knowing me...
    I really liked the first one, BTW.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited April 2018 Posts: 23,883
    Where Eagles Dare (1968)
    fabk2tW.jpg

    I'm generally not a big fan of war films, but this Alistair Maclean penned and Brian Hutton directed entry caught my interest from the very first time I saw it as a kid. That's probably because it has elements of espionage. It also features great action and stunts, beautiful scenery, and some serious machismo from the likes of two legends: Richard Burton and Clint Eastwood. There's also some decent (and quite effective) eye candy in the form of Mary Ure and Ingrid Pitt, and I recognize a lot of the supporting cast from older films as well. The plot appears clear at the outset: 7 Allied Commandos must infiltrate Nazi hideout Schloss Adler (Castle of the Eagles) set deep in the alps (and only accessible by cable car) in order to rescue and escape with a captured American general who may be instrumental in ending the war. Strange occurrences, deaths & twists occur from the very start of their mission however, which suggests all is not as it seems and treachery may be in their midst.

    The cast is top notch as can be expected. Burton in particular really is the boss in this one, barking orders at every one with inherent authority and confidence while being no slouch himself. Eastwood is his usual lethal 'man of action rather than words' self. Derren Nesbitt is particularly good as a suspicious Gestapo officer. I can see how this film inspired action in many future Bond entries as well as that famous pub scene in Tarantino's Basterds. Great OTT fun.
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