Why ??!!...The whinging,moaning,complaining,ranting,letting off steam thread !!

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  • edited October 15 Posts: 11,611
    barryt007 wrote: »
    @Torgeirtrap what kind of traps are they that you are using,though,the box trap where the box closes ?

    @barryt007 By box trap, I take it you mean the kind which only traps the mouse and doesn't kill it?

    The kind I went for is this kind of traps, which is a variation of those wooden type ones. The mouse has to get underneath the yellow bait lid to reach the bait, which sets off the trap. It must be quite powerful, as the state of the mouse I caught wasn't pretty.

    hub9bxfppz5jr3rrb2tx.jpg
  • Posts: 19,339
    Urgh !!

    im-not-even-4xm1xb.jpg
  • Posts: 11,611
    barryt007 wrote: »
    Urgh !!

    im-not-even-4xm1xb.jpg

    Disgusting indeed, there was mouse blood involved…

    At least I placed the mouse traps on the rubber car mats and not the car floor itself, so the cleaning process didn't take too long. I certainly hope I won't need to do the same cleaning process all over again!
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Hamburg, near the Atlantic Hotel
    Posts: 4,745
    I'm all for traps ensuring that the mouse that triggers it is quickly and safely killed. I don't want mice to inhabit my house, but I wouldn't want them to suffer either. Like from being maimed but not killed immediately by an insufficient spring, or starving to death because nobody checks the box trap.
  • Posts: 4,316
    Those damn commercials on YouTube! Interrupting potentially magical moments in beautiful works of clasical music. There should be laws against that!
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 32,440
    jobo wrote: »
    Those damn commercials on YouTube! Interrupting potentially magical moments in beautiful works of clasical music. There should be laws against that!

    That's why those free (or paid) Adblock extensions are your friend - at least on computer/tablet, anyway. YouTube ads are garbage.
  • RichardTheBruceRichardTheBruce I'm motivated by my Duty.
    Posts: 5,520
    Added insurance against mice (and snakes): presence of moth balls for a short period of time.
  • edited October 15 Posts: 11,611
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    I'm all for traps ensuring that the mouse that triggers it is quickly and safely killed. I don't want mice to inhabit my house, but I wouldn't want them to suffer either. Like from being maimed but not killed immediately by an insufficient spring, or starving to death because nobody checks the box trap.

    Indeed. This trap I posted an image of above seems to have worked quite well as far as being quick and effective goes. It was easy to get rid of the mouse afterwards too, which is a bonus.
    Added insurance against mice (and snakes): presence of moth balls for a short period of time.

    Didn't know mice don't like moth balls. I might remember wrong, but doesn't moth balls contain chemicals that one way or the other are not safe to be exposed to (or something)?
    jobo wrote: »
    Those damn commercials on YouTube! Interrupting potentially magical moments in beautiful works of clasical music. There should be laws against that!

    Definitely agree!
    A while back Youtube had a yellow line on the time bar, indicating where an ad was to be played. Now they don't anymore, and instead you have this countdown appearing on the screen instead. Much more preferred the yellow line, as you could see how many ad breaks you would get.
  • Posts: 3,785
    jobo wrote: »
    Those damn commercials on YouTube! Interrupting potentially magical moments in beautiful works of clasical music. There should be laws against that!

    Seconded ! You're watching a documentary, and bingo, one of those appear out of nowhere. I've seen so many ads for the GOT game now that I'm starting to reconsider me buying the TV series and binge-watching it. Plus, it had a funny effect on my dance class : my teacher uses music clips from YouTube on his phone to do his classes. So, almost every time, each routine starts with an unwanted ad. At first, it's funny, but he'll soon have to go back to CDs.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Hamburg, near the Atlantic Hotel
    Posts: 4,745
    Gerard wrote: »
    jobo wrote: »
    Those damn commercials on YouTube! Interrupting potentially magical moments in beautiful works of clasical music. There should be laws against that!

    Seconded ! You're watching a documentary, and bingo, one of those appear out of nowhere. I've seen so many ads for the GOT game now that I'm starting to reconsider me buying the TV series and binge-watching it. Plus, it had a funny effect on my dance class : my teacher uses music clips from YouTube on his phone to do his classes. So, almost every time, each routine starts with an unwanted ad. At first, it's funny, but he'll soon have to go back to CDs.
    Keep in mind that for the user/viewer YouTube is a free service, unlike e.g. the public TV networks in Europe which are financed by (basically) taxes/fees/contributions, whatever the exact legal reasoning. Supposing all of that YouTubing is legal, it is completely up to them whether to contaminate their program by advertising or not. If enough people object, let them know. If not, they will continue. And in that case, quite rightly so. And it's up to the users to draw the consequences by ... simply not watching. So go ahead!
  • CommanderRossCommanderRoss The bottom of a pitch lake in Eastern Trinidad, place called La Brea
    Posts: 5,544
    So now there's some guy in the US who's got apparently a similar gmail adress as I do. First I got mail for him from his employer, and I thought it was her mistake (HR person). Now though he's searching for a job, as he's subscribed me to four or five job application sites, and apparently he wants to take up running too. Or she, btw, 'couse now I think of it the last one was commercials for women running. Another newsletter I blocked.
  • QQ7QQ7 Croatia
    Posts: 297
    Why is "Casino Royale" so bloody good, lads?!

    Recently I've been thinking a lot about it while listening to it's beautiful soundtrack.
  • Posts: 2
    Why did Bond and Bibi not get ice cream?
  • Posts: 3,785
    This morning, I'm disgusted. Let me explain :

    One of my favourite groups, Celtic Woman, is doing a concert in Paris (their second one in 9 years). Except that I became aware of it only this morning, and the concert is tonight at 20.00. Bad enough, but :

    1) Tomorrow, I have to start work at 6 am, so I have to go to ed early if I don't want to be a zombie tomorrow. Strike one.

    2) I have Things That Need To Be Done at home (mostly storage, but also administrative work). Strike two.

    3) There's a stike on the French train service, and I'm not sure If I can get a train to go to Paris, or worse to come back from Paris (see first strike). Strike Three.

    So I'll have to make do with the DVDs (I own them all°. Okay, it's not the end of the world, but still, I'm rather angry. Guess that I'll have to follow the group a bit more closely than I usually do in order to prepare better for next year.

    Speaking of that train strike, let's hope it will end by ocotber 27th, because it's when I go on vacation. And I would hate to miss that.
  • WalecsWalecs On Her Majesty's Secret Service
    Posts: 2,589
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    Walecs wrote: »
    I find rather depressing that I will die before being my father's age because of global warming. Meh. :|

    Is this a serious statement, @Walecs? Because if it is, I'm sure I can put your mind at ease. ;-)

    Ah, you're one of those in denial, aren't you?
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    edited October 20 Posts: 17,163
    Walecs wrote: »
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    Walecs wrote: »
    I find rather depressing that I will die before being my father's age because of global warming. Meh. :|

    Is this a serious statement, @Walecs? Because if it is, I'm sure I can put your mind at ease. ;-)

    Ah, you're one of those in denial, aren't you?

    No sir, I'm not in denial. Far from it. However, I do believe that we needn't resort to thinking the worst right away. We are seeing signs of stagnation of the world population's growth; we are slowly but surely entering a new phase in carbon-neutral technology; we can find inventive ways to protect ourselves against the worst effects of climate change, and so on. A lot will, of course, depend on how willing governments are going to be to implement those technologies and required lifestyle changes in their politics, but the people are getting more concerned and the people are raising their voice, so that's a good thing.

    I'm not saying we need to just sit back and let it all happen. But I disagree with the fatalistic notion that all is lost anyway. That too would be a problematic over-exaggeration. We're facing tough challenges indeed, but we can overcome the most crucial ones if we try. The know-how is there, the technologies are available. But people will need to re-consider their lifestyle priorities and politicians will need to boldly and bravely do what many still daren't: oppose the very forces (greed, exploitation, ...) that have been keeping them on a leech for as long as we can remember. It's not a matter of not being able to do something; it's a matter of wanting to do something. And since climate change has become a popular concern and will continue to be for a very long time, democracies will force their leaders to react--and it won't be too late yet.

    If you want to, @Walecs, there are actually two very good books written on the subject:
    - Steven Pinker's Enlightenment Now
    - Hans Rosling's Factfullness

    I strongly recommend those.

    In case you doubt my sincerity: I'm a scientist who teaches science to young people, I'm also an atheist who believes in nothing but empirical data, I'm a citizen of the world with a girlfriend of Indian, Ugandese, English and German descent AND I couldn't be farther away from the politics of Trump and his narrow-minded followers. I'm absolutely not a braindead climate denier. I'm anything but. But I'm also not jumping on every doomsday wagon right away. The world has never been in a better place if you look at trendlines rather than newspaper headlines. We tend to poison our minds with "bad news", thinking the world is in the worst state ever, when, in fact, it's not. Journalists are selling bad news because we're buying it--literally!--but sometimes they need a hooligan bar fight on page 1 to have any news at all. We're left to believe the world of man is all but a thing of the past, yet we've never been so ready to tackle some of the biggest problems headed our way. The so-called "third world" is catching on with us faster than we ever have. Most children in the world have access to education and vaccines, girls included, because in the 21st century, that is finally possible. Conflict zones in the world are getting smaller and fewer. The only thing standing in the way of making rapid progress is the West, confused and confounded because the political and economic centres of gravity are moving away from Europe and North-America, and so they resort to Trumpian politics and Brexit and other strange "remedies" to uphold some naive notion that we're still living in a golden age that truthfully never was. In time, even those critical errors will be fixed.

    All I'm saying is, @Walecs, that like you, I'm concerned. Deeply. And troubled, that too, by many things I see around me. But we can trust ourselves to react and do something. And in many ways, we are. It'll take time to see the effects and bad stuff will happen meanwhile, but I'm confident that, as with the depletion of the ozone layer, this issue too will eventually be taken care of. Not because I hope it will, but because many indicators are showing that it is.
  • Posts: 3,785
    This is a two for one. So let's start :

    1) Right now, I'm on vacation in Britanny, visiting (what's left of) my family. And as usual, I booked my train tickets (as well as my lodging) three months in advance or so. What I didn't figure was that there would be a surprise strike in the train service that would impact my departure from Paris. In short, my train to Brest was cancelled, among others. Thank heavens my sister (who also lives near Paris) was going on vacation herself that day, or I might have had to cancel the vacation (and everything I planned to do) and stay home. Still, the trip was long (7.30 hours by car against 4 by train). Still, as the strike is going on, i'm not sure that my return train won't be cancelled as well, and that could cause problems for me at work next Week.

    2) French television and its lack of respect towards viewers. I follow Elementary, and was glad to hear that the channel M6 was going to air the sixth season (yes, we're a bit late) starting in september. Except that they decided to air it, first at 10.45 pm, then at 23.35 pm. And after the tenth episode, they decided to skip the unaired épisodes altogether, airing only repeats of seson 2 after midnight. Last year, they aired the fifth season, with five unaired épisodes, which forced me to use the replay function of my box quite extensively. I Don't know what's going on, but I think it's a disservice to all fans of Sherlock Holmes, Johnny Lee Miller and Lucy Liu. I Wonder when they will air the remaining épisodes, and if I'll be able to see them.
  • WalecsWalecs On Her Majesty's Secret Service
    Posts: 2,589
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    Walecs wrote: »
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    Walecs wrote: »
    I find rather depressing that I will die before being my father's age because of global warming. Meh. :|

    Is this a serious statement, @Walecs? Because if it is, I'm sure I can put your mind at ease. ;-)

    Ah, you're one of those in denial, aren't you?

    No sir, I'm not in denial. Far from it. However, I do believe that we needn't resort to thinking the worst right away. We are seeing signs of stagnation of the world population's growth; we are slowly but surely entering a new phase in carbon-neutral technology; we can find inventive ways to protect ourselves against the worst effects of climate change, and so on. A lot will, of course, depend on how willing governments are going to be to implement those technologies and required lifestyle changes in their politics, but the people are getting more concerned and the people are raising their voice, so that's a good thing.

    I'm not saying we need to just sit back and let it all happen. But I disagree with the fatalistic notion that all is lost anyway. That too would be a problematic over-exaggeration. We're facing tough challenges indeed, but we can overcome the most crucial ones if we try. The know-how is there, the technologies are available. But people will need to re-consider their lifestyle priorities and politicians will need to boldly and bravely do what many still daren't: oppose the very forces (greed, exploitation, ...) that have been keeping them on a leech for as long as we can remember. It's not a matter of not being able to do something; it's a matter of wanting to do something. And since climate change has become a popular concern and will continue to be for a very long time, democracies will force their leaders to react--and it won't be too late yet.

    If you want to, @Walecs, there are actually two very good books written on the subject:
    - Steven Pinker's Enlightenment Now
    - Hans Rosling's Factfullness

    I strongly recommend those.

    In case you doubt my sincerity: I'm a scientist who teaches science to young people, I'm also an atheist who believes in nothing but empirical data, I'm a citizen of the world with a girlfriend of Indian, Ugandese, English and German descent AND I couldn't be farther away from the politics of Trump and his narrow-minded followers. I'm absolutely not a braindead climate denier. I'm anything but. But I'm also not jumping on every doomsday wagon right away. The world has never been in a better place if you look at trendlines rather than newspaper headlines. We tend to poison our minds with "bad news", thinking the world is in the worst state ever, when, in fact, it's not. Journalists are selling bad news because we're buying it--literally!--but sometimes they need a hooligan bar fight on page 1 to have any news at all. We're left to believe the world of man is all but a thing of the past, yet we've never been so ready to tackle some of the biggest problems headed our way. The so-called "third world" is catching on with us faster than we ever have. Most children in the world have access to education and vaccines, girls included, because in the 21st century, that is finally possible. Conflict zones in the world are getting smaller and fewer. The only thing standing in the way of making rapid progress is the West, confused and confounded because the political and economic centres of gravity are moving away from Europe and North-America, and so they resort to Trumpian politics and Brexit and other strange "remedies" to uphold some naive notion that we're still living in a golden age that truthfully never was. In time, even those critical errors will be fixed.

    All I'm saying is, @Walecs, that like you, I'm concerned. Deeply. And troubled, that too, by many things I see around me. But we can trust ourselves to react and do something. And in many ways, we are. It'll take time to see the effects and bad stuff will happen meanwhile, but I'm confident that, as with the depletion of the ozone layer, this issue too will eventually be taken care of. Not because I hope it will, but because many indicators are showing that it is.

    Thanks a lot for taking your time and writing this, @DarthDimi . I really appreciated it and you did bring a ray of hope (or a quantum of solace, if you may :) ). It's especially reassuring because you proved that you know what you're talking about.
  • edited November 3 Posts: 11,611
    Gerard wrote: »
    This is a two for one. So let's start :

    1) Right now, I'm on vacation in Britanny, visiting (what's left of) my family. And as usual, I booked my train tickets (as well as my lodging) three months in advance or so. What I didn't figure was that there would be a surprise strike in the train service that would impact my departure from Paris. In short, my train to Brest was cancelled, among others. Thank heavens my sister (who also lives near Paris) was going on vacation herself that day, or I might have had to cancel the vacation (and everything I planned to do) and stay home. Still, the trip was long (7.30 hours by car against 4 by train). Still, as the strike is going on, i'm not sure that my return train won't be cancelled as well, and that could cause problems for me at work next Week.

    Hope it all sorts itself out, and that you have a great vacation!

    Gerard wrote: »
    2) French television and its lack of respect towards viewers. I follow Elementary, and was glad to hear that the channel M6 was going to air the sixth season (yes, we're a bit late) starting in september. Except that they decided to air it, first at 10.45 pm, then at 23.35 pm. And after the tenth episode, they decided to skip the unaired épisodes altogether, airing only repeats of seson 2 after midnight. Last year, they aired the fifth season, with five unaired épisodes, which forced me to use the replay function of my box quite extensively. I Don't know what's going on, but I think it's a disservice to all fans of Sherlock Holmes, Johnny Lee Miller and Lucy Liu. I Wonder when they will air the remaining épisodes, and if I'll be able to see them.

    I watch Elementary a well, and as far as I've seen, Norwegian TV2 have aired all episodes late at night – but at least all the episodes. I've seen some episodes on their streaming service, TV2 Sumo, but since the episodes have been available only for a limited time (and often at times when I haven't had the opportunity to watch them), I've ended up getting each season on DVD instead. I've yet to buy the final two seasons, but will do so tonight, as an early Christmas gift to myself.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 17,163
    My neighbours have a dog. A small dog. That little thing is all right, except at night. Like, right now, for example. Its owners have a habit of spending the better part of the night at the local pub. When loneliness kicks in, the bloody mutt starts crying without interruption. I can't sleep, and if I have to switch on my television to produce the kind of loudness that overrules the dog's I, in turn, will be keeping my other neighbours from their sleep. I could call the owners of the dog, but they'll just stupidly point out that they've never known the dog to cry like this (like they already have). Well, of course not. Pooch isn't going to cry when they're home, only when they're not.

    I'm usually not a big fan of dogs, to put it mildly. But I'm usually even less a fan of dog owners. Well, most of them are fine, it's just that some can't seem to understand that some folks, like myself, would really appreciate it if they'd keep their beasts on a leash in public, and also: if you want to keep a dog, that comes with a certain responsibility. For example, don't leave the animal home alone, all night long!

    Now, I'm not the police calling type. Don't want to create any tension between my neighbours and myself, but to be frank, I've considered getting the cops involved. Look, I need to get up early, every morning. Two hours of sleep per night aren't going to work for me. After three days, you can come look for me in a hospital bed. Earplugs? I've got them. They don't work in this case. Headphones? Try sleeping with those! No, my neighbours have to show some effort, not I. I'm not the one bringing a useless little furball in the house and keeping my neighbours awake by not taking good care of it.

    If anyone has some extra advice for me, please feel free to share it.
  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe "Better cold with them on, than dead with them off, I always say."Moderator
    edited November 11 Posts: 10,788
    It isn't the dogs fault, it's the owners. Little dogs tend to be the noisiest, but maybe they didn't leave a toy out, and the poor thing is bored.

    Have you seen the Lee Evans film, The Martins? I have neighbours on one side, just like them. The screaming matches these pond scum have, are unbelievable. I guarantee you, worse than you would get from any dog barking.

    Dogs are better than people. Dogs have never committed a fraction of the sickening acts which we have a responisbility not to do, yet do with with not surprising frequency.

    I love dogs. Hate people. As a dog owner, I rarely leave mine at home. I'll do it from time to time, to give him some independance. There are irresponsible owners out there, but we're not all like that.
  • WalecsWalecs On Her Majesty's Secret Service
    edited November 11 Posts: 2,589
    It isn't the dogs fault, it's the owners. Little dogs tend to be the noisiest, but maybe they didn't leave a toy out, and the poor thing is bored.

    Have you seen the Lee Evans film, The Martins? I have neighbours on one side, just like them. The screaming matches these pond scum have, are unbelievable. I guarantee you, worse than you would get from any dog barking.

    Dogs are better than people. Dogs have never committed a fraction of the sickening acts which we have a responisbility not to do, yet do with with not surprising frequency.

    I love dogs. Hate people. As a dog owner, I rarely leave mine at home. I'll do it from time to time, to give him some independance. There are irresponsible owners out there, but we're not all like that.

    +1. I'm not a dog owner myself but I agree with every single word of yours. I see why the situation is stressing for @DarthDimi , though. As he explained, he has to get up early to go working and he can barely sleep at night.

    First thing I'd suggest you to do would be talking with the dog owners, but I seem to understand that they're not sympathetic people and that would lead to nothing. At this point yeah, I'd call the cops. I don't know if that'd be helpful somehow, but being sleepless because of your neighbours' stupidty is not really fair for you.
  • CommanderRossCommanderRoss The bottom of a pitch lake in Eastern Trinidad, place called La Brea
    Posts: 5,544
    @Darth any way of giving the little guy some sausage with sleeping pill in it? Would work for everybody...
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 17,163
    @Darth any way of giving the little guy some sausage with sleeping pill in it? Would work for everybody...

    Funny as it may seem, I could never take a dog's life. :) But I have no objections to getting some dog owners (the type that leaves dogs behind in the middle of nowhere to get rid of it) intimate with a concentrated solution of sodium hydroxide. ;-)

    I loathe dogs, but I mean them no harm. I suppose that's a bit of a paradox.:)
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Ghost office
    Posts: 34,378
    A case for a police dog.
    192069634410146849133816.jpg
  • CommanderRossCommanderRoss The bottom of a pitch lake in Eastern Trinidad, place called La Brea
    Posts: 5,544
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    @Darth any way of giving the little guy some sausage with sleeping pill in it? Would work for everybody...

    Funny as it may seem, I could never take a dog's life. :) But I have no objections to getting some dog owners (the type that leaves dogs behind in the middle of nowhere to get rid of it) intimate with a concentrated solution of sodium hydroxide. ;-)

    I loathe dogs, but I mean them no harm. I suppose that's a bit of a paradox.:)

    I was referring to actualsleeping pills. The little pooch wouldbe off to dreamland and you'd be slaping like a baby too. I agree it takes some effort to do it every evening it's necessary, but still. I'm all agianst killing animals, except if they belong to the human species.
  • Posts: 11,611
    A case for a police dog.
    192069634410146849133816.jpg

    Looking at that illustration I can't help but wonder who made it. Al Taliaferro? Carl Barks? Vicar?
  • BMW_with_missilesBMW_with_missiles All the usual refinements.
    Posts: 2,879
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    My neighbours have a dog. A small dog. That little thing is all right, except at night. Like, right now, for example. Its owners have a habit of spending the better part of the night at the local pub. When loneliness kicks in, the bloody mutt starts crying without interruption. I can't sleep, and if I have to switch on my television to produce the kind of loudness that overrules the dog's I, in turn, will be keeping my other neighbours from their sleep. I could call the owners of the dog, but they'll just stupidly point out that they've never known the dog to cry like this (like they already have). Well, of course not. Pooch isn't going to cry when they're home, only when they're not.

    I'm usually not a big fan of dogs, to put it mildly. But I'm usually even less a fan of dog owners. Well, most of them are fine, it's just that some can't seem to understand that some folks, like myself, would really appreciate it if they'd keep their beasts on a leash in public, and also: if you want to keep a dog, that comes with a certain responsibility. For example, don't leave the animal home alone, all night long!

    Now, I'm not the police calling type. Don't want to create any tension between my neighbours and myself, but to be frank, I've considered getting the cops involved. Look, I need to get up early, every morning. Two hours of sleep per night aren't going to work for me. After three days, you can come look for me in a hospital bed. Earplugs? I've got them. They don't work in this case. Headphones? Try sleeping with those! No, my neighbours have to show some effort, not I. I'm not the one bringing a useless little furball in the house and keeping my neighbours awake by not taking good care of it.

    If anyone has some extra advice for me, please feel free to share it.

    @DarthDimi As a former PetSmart employee I’d suggest trying a dog whistle. The ultrasonic frequency can interrupt the dog’s barking and get it to stop. Better still, there’s this gadget called the Sonic Egg that is electronic but works on the same principle. If it detects a dog barking it automatically emits a highly pitched sound that only they can hear. Those are the only two solutions I can think of that would work remotely.
  • edited November 15 Posts: 12,150
    Birdleson wrote: »
    barryt007 wrote: »
    Why does Daniel Craig get so much bloody power ?! Right down to a possible choice of title !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    This is a thorn for me as well. The latitude that current EON gives to actors and directors would never have flown in Cubby’s era, and we were better off for it. I love film as an art form and respect the actors, writers and directors, but this is Bond; it is a product that has a history and a system. Enough kowtowing.

    Old post that I've only just seen but I think it's a balancing act. Bond is bigger than the actor who plays him, that's why I really don't think another Craig film after NTTD would be a good idea, but I also think it seems to work out better for all involved when they give the actor some say. We don't want another Connery (bitterness for years on both sides, hearing about his last phonecall to Cubby in the EON doc was heartbreaking) or Brosnan (where a great Bond seems ashamed of his own films).
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Ghost office
    Posts: 34,378
    A case for a police dog.
    192069634410146849133816.jpg

    Looking at that illustration I can't help but wonder who made it. Al Taliaferro? Carl Barks? Vicar?

    Barks never did Chief O Hara. He is a Floyd Gottfredson character, but this looks like a later version.
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