Music in SPECTRE

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  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited October 2015 Posts: 23,883
    Mansfield wrote: »
    Here is a thought to consider: Skyfall is an introspective film and has tracks that are appropriate to that story. Spectre is indicating to be more over the top, so I think there will at least be a few more big sounds in the score.

    I hope so. I am looking for a little more oomph to his action scoring. Not sure if he will do it, but I really would like to hear it, because he has the ability. I too am going to avoid listening to anything more from SP until I see it with the film.

    On an unrelated note, I always wanted the late Wojciech Kilar for Bond. He was never on the radar but I always found his scores very memorable and melodic.



  • MansfieldMansfield Where the hell have you been?
    Posts: 1,262
    bondjames wrote: »
    I hope so. I am looking for a little more oomph to his action scoring. Not sure if he will do it, but I really would like to hear it, because he has the ability. I too am going to avoid listening to anything more from SP until I see it with the film.
    If his soundtrack has no greater flare than Skyfall it will receive criticism from a lot of people, including me. It's not just a one dimensional attitude of Newman, "needing to step up his game," since I have grown to see the attachment that his work and the product of Skyfall have in common. This is clearly one of the strengths of Newman. The spots and trailers show more action in Spectre than almost the entire Skyfall film. In that regard, I am hoping Newman takes the form of a chameleon to match the tone of Spectre just as well as he did in Skyfall. If he does that, they will inherently be bigger themes and sounds.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited October 2015 Posts: 23,883
    Mansfield wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    I hope so. I am looking for a little more oomph to his action scoring. Not sure if he will do it, but I really would like to hear it, because he has the ability. I too am going to avoid listening to anything more from SP until I see it with the film.
    If his soundtrack has no greater flare than Skyfall it will receive criticism from a lot of people, including me. It's not just a one dimensional attitude of Newman, "needing to step up his game," since I have grown to see the attachment that his work and the product of Skyfall have in common. This is clearly one of the strengths of Newman. The spots and trailers show more action in Spectre than almost the entire Skyfall film. In that regard, I am hoping Newman takes the form of a chameleon to match the tone of Spectre just as well as he did in Skyfall. If he does that, they will inherently be bigger themes and sounds.

    He may very well do that indeed. I just saw Bridge of Spies yesterday, and his scoring for that film, while sparse (it was underscored in places, perhaps deliberately) is incredibly seamless with the action on screen, almost like an extension of the acting. I remember thinking that as I watched it because I knew he did the score and I was listening intently to it in anticipation of/for clues to SP.

    You are correct - he is a sort of chameleon. I like the SF score with the film but it's one of the few Bond soundtracks I don't own, and I have no intention of purchasing it. With the film however, it goes hand in glove, never competing with what's on screen, but rather, supporting it.
  • Posts: 501
    Shardlake wrote: »
    0iker0 wrote: »
    I would go for Murray Gold, Desplat or Alberto Iglesias. Alberto Iglesias did the Tinker Tailor soldier Spy film if you can recall the score, a very similar score in tone and style to The Ipcress Files.

    Iglesias is a good call, TTSS has to one of my favourite films of this decade and his score was very classy, it seems we are on the same page and Desplat scores have touch of Barry while having his own distinctive flavour.

    I still think Holmes is a missed opportunity though, he does a great job with the Bond theme on his superb Lets Get Killed album and his Oceans scores show he could more than make something memorable and stirring.

    If you liked Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy you should listen to The Skin I Live In. Probably his best work. Magnificent
  • I'm the only one?

    Well this is a Bond fan forum. Dismissing something because it's too Bondian and favoring something that is more a generic crowd pleaser could get well in a general movie or box office fan forum, but not here :)

  • doubleoegodoubleoego #LightWork
    Posts: 11,098
    I was blaring backfire whilst playing the DB5 chase level in Bloodstone....and it works amazingly well.
  • suavejmfsuavejmf Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England
    Posts: 5,131
    I'll have it on in my car on the 23rd!
  • Recently I found very interesting video cover. Two russian violinist shooted video of main song James Bond speciality for premier. Want to share with you this nice video!!!! what do you think about it?
  • edited October 2015 Posts: 157
    Mansfield wrote: »
    Dismissing David Arnold's work as John Barry copy-paste is a gross exaggeration and pretty disrespectful. The only score he penned that can even slightly bear that criticism is Tomorrow Never Dies. Casino Royale and Quantum Of Solace in particular are very much their own scores with unique themes independent of John Barry's work

    Are you telling me you can't hear David Arnold's indebtedness to John Barry (and not just his work in Bond) in cues ranging from African Rundown, Aston Montengero. Vesper, City of Lovers, The Bitch's Dead, Time to Get Out, Talamone, Night at the Opera and so on? To say otherwise so seems a bit disingenuous.

    I won't deny that Arnold has his own sound (and some recurring gestures I find annoying, like A, B and C - brass pileups on the dominant that always lead up to a cut or sync point, and present in almost every Arnold action cue) but it's hardly as unique and influential as Newman's.

  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    edited October 2015 Posts: 7,000
    bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-34570361


    Short interview with Newman for BBC.
  • @CraigMooreOHMSS

    Thanks for posting. they were having a fun chat. sounds like Newman put in a lot of work on the film.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 7,000
    @nobodydoesitbetter

    Absolutely. Regardless of what people think or don't think of Newman's music - he seems like a nice bloke.
  • MansfieldMansfield Where the hell have you been?
    Posts: 1,262
    I did catch the short clip in the interview. Thomas Newman meets Howard Shore? I'm on board.
  • 5815892458158924 Valencia (Spain)
    Posts: 30
    a question, the 23 came to London, you know where I can buy the OST Spectre? Thank you.
  • AceHoleAceHole Belgium, via Britain
    Posts: 1,726
    Mansfield wrote: »
    Dismissing David Arnold's work as John Barry copy-paste is a gross exaggeration and pretty disrespectful. The only score he penned that can even slightly bear that criticism is Tomorrow Never Dies. Casino Royale and Quantum Of Solace in particular are very much their own scores with unique themes independent of John Barry's work

    Are you telling me you can't hear David Arnold's indebtedness to John Barry (and not just his work in Bond) in cues ranging from African Rundown, Aston Montengero. Vesper, City of Lovers, The Bitch's Dead, Time to Get Out, Talamone, Night at the Opera and so on? To say otherwise so seems a bit disingenuous.

    I won't deny that Arnold has his own sound (and some recurring gestures I find annoying, like A, B and C - brass pileups on the dominant that always lead up to a cut or sync point, and present in almost every Arnold action cue) but it's hardly as unique and influential as Newman's.

    Arnold's 'action' cues were very tiresome on the ear. The 'White Knight' opening on TND score was his best attempt at a decent action cue, and was quite good. The less said about the rest of his uptempo efforts the better really...
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 7,000
    AceHole wrote: »
    Mansfield wrote: »
    Dismissing David Arnold's work as John Barry copy-paste is a gross exaggeration and pretty disrespectful. The only score he penned that can even slightly bear that criticism is Tomorrow Never Dies. Casino Royale and Quantum Of Solace in particular are very much their own scores with unique themes independent of John Barry's work

    Are you telling me you can't hear David Arnold's indebtedness to John Barry (and not just his work in Bond) in cues ranging from African Rundown, Aston Montengero. Vesper, City of Lovers, The Bitch's Dead, Time to Get Out, Talamone, Night at the Opera and so on? To say otherwise so seems a bit disingenuous.

    I won't deny that Arnold has his own sound (and some recurring gestures I find annoying, like A, B and C - brass pileups on the dominant that always lead up to a cut or sync point, and present in almost every Arnold action cue) but it's hardly as unique and influential as Newman's.

    Arnold's 'action' cues were very tiresome on the ear. The 'White Knight' opening on TND score was his best attempt at a decent action cue, and was quite good. The less said about the rest of his uptempo efforts the better really...

    You mean great stuff like "Backseat Driver", "Come In 007, Your Time Is Up", "African Rundown", and "Time To Get Out"?

  • AceHoleAceHole Belgium, via Britain
    Posts: 1,726
    AceHole wrote: »
    Mansfield wrote: »
    Dismissing David Arnold's work as John Barry copy-paste is a gross exaggeration and pretty disrespectful. The only score he penned that can even slightly bear that criticism is Tomorrow Never Dies. Casino Royale and Quantum Of Solace in particular are very much their own scores with unique themes independent of John Barry's work

    Are you telling me you can't hear David Arnold's indebtedness to John Barry (and not just his work in Bond) in cues ranging from African Rundown, Aston Montengero. Vesper, City of Lovers, The Bitch's Dead, Time to Get Out, Talamone, Night at the Opera and so on? To say otherwise so seems a bit disingenuous.

    I won't deny that Arnold has his own sound (and some recurring gestures I find annoying, like A, B and C - brass pileups on the dominant that always lead up to a cut or sync point, and present in almost every Arnold action cue) but it's hardly as unique and influential as Newman's.

    Arnold's 'action' cues were very tiresome on the ear. The 'White Knight' opening on TND score was his best attempt at a decent action cue, and was quite good. The less said about the rest of his uptempo efforts the better really...

    You mean great stuff like "Backseat Driver", "Come In 007, Your Time Is Up", "African Rundown", and "Time To Get Out"?

    I don't really rate any of those, no. I find I zone out completely (from the background music) watching TND to QoS when Arnold ups the tempo on his scores.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited October 2015 Posts: 23,883
    AceHole wrote: »
    AceHole wrote: »
    Mansfield wrote: »
    Dismissing David Arnold's work as John Barry copy-paste is a gross exaggeration and pretty disrespectful. The only score he penned that can even slightly bear that criticism is Tomorrow Never Dies. Casino Royale and Quantum Of Solace in particular are very much their own scores with unique themes independent of John Barry's work

    Are you telling me you can't hear David Arnold's indebtedness to John Barry (and not just his work in Bond) in cues ranging from African Rundown, Aston Montengero. Vesper, City of Lovers, The Bitch's Dead, Time to Get Out, Talamone, Night at the Opera and so on? To say otherwise so seems a bit disingenuous.

    I won't deny that Arnold has his own sound (and some recurring gestures I find annoying, like A, B and C - brass pileups on the dominant that always lead up to a cut or sync point, and present in almost every Arnold action cue) but it's hardly as unique and influential as Newman's.

    Arnold's 'action' cues were very tiresome on the ear. The 'White Knight' opening on TND score was his best attempt at a decent action cue, and was quite good. The less said about the rest of his uptempo efforts the better really...

    You mean great stuff like "Backseat Driver", "Come In 007, Your Time Is Up", "African Rundown", and "Time To Get Out"?

    I don't really rate any of those, no. I find I zone out completely (from the background music) watching TND to QoS when Arnold ups the tempo on his scores.

    Arnold's action scoring improved dramatically to my ears during the DC run. However, he is still quite subpar compared to every other one-off Bond composer (Newman still needs to prove himself in SP) imho, and quite unmelodic, Those who complain about Newman being generic and hold up Arnold as an alternative are like a pot calling the kettle black, again imho.
  • mcdonbbmcdonbb deep in the Heart of Texas
    Posts: 4,116
    bondjames wrote: »
    AceHole wrote: »
    AceHole wrote: »
    Mansfield wrote: »
    Dismissing David Arnold's work as John Barry copy-paste is a gross exaggeration and pretty disrespectful. The only score he penned that can even slightly bear that criticism is Tomorrow Never Dies. Casino Royale and Quantum Of Solace in particular are very much their own scores with unique themes independent of John Barry's work

    Are you telling me you can't hear David Arnold's indebtedness to John Barry (and not just his work in Bond) in cues ranging from African Rundown, Aston Montengero. Vesper, City of Lovers, The Bitch's Dead, Time to Get Out, Talamone, Night at the Opera and so on? To say otherwise so seems a bit disingenuous.

    I won't deny that Arnold has his own sound (and some recurring gestures I find annoying, like A, B and C - brass pileups on the dominant that always lead up to a cut or sync point, and present in almost every Arnold action cue) but it's hardly as unique and influential as Newman's.

    Arnold's 'action' cues were very tiresome on the ear. The 'White Knight' opening on TND score was his best attempt at a decent action cue, and was quite good. The less said about the rest of his uptempo efforts the better really...

    You mean great stuff like "Backseat Driver", "Come In 007, Your Time Is Up", "African Rundown", and "Time To Get Out"?

    I don't really rate any of those, no. I find I zone out completely (from the background music) watching TND to QoS when Arnold ups the tempo on his scores.

    Arnold's action scoring improved dramatically to my ears during the DC run. However, he is still quite subpar compared to every other one-off Bond composer (Newman still needs to prove himself in SP) imho, and quite unmelodic, Those who complain about Newman being generic and hold up Arnold as an alternative are like a pot calling the kettle black, again imho.

    I've said before I admire Arnold's dedication to the series and Newman's artistic expertise. BUT I really don't like either one.


  • SkyfallCraigSkyfallCraig Rome, Italy
    Posts: 630
  • edited October 2015 Posts: 11,425
    That tells us very little.

    Would have been keen to know how Newman has incorporated it into the film.

    The only morsel of new info is Mendes saying the songs helps with the storytelling, which is perhaps a tiny indication it will appear during the film, a la WHATTITW.

  • WalecsWalecs On Her Majesty's Secret Service
    Posts: 3,157
    Getafix wrote: »
    That tells us very little.

    Would have been keen to know how Newman has incorporated it into the film.

    The only morsel of new info is Mendes saying the songs helps with the storytelling, which is perhaps a tiny indication it will appear during the film, a la WHATTITW.
    So is it confirmed that it will appear?
  • Posts: 5,745
    Walecs wrote: »
    Getafix wrote: »
    That tells us very little.

    Would have been keen to know how Newman has incorporated it into the film.

    The only morsel of new info is Mendes saying the songs helps with the storytelling, which is perhaps a tiny indication it will appear during the film, a la WHATTITW.
    So is it confirmed that it will appear?

    What part of that sounds like confirmation?
  • Posts: 5,767
    I won't deny that Arnold has his own sound ... but it's hardly as unique and influential as Newman's.
    Newman´s quiter parts may well be influential, or at least would deserve to be so. His action cues for SF were influenced, but shurely not influential or unique.


    bondjames wrote: »
    Those who complain about Newman being generic and hold up Arnold as an alternative are like a pot calling the kettle black, again imho.
    Arnold isn´t the definition of original, but his action cues express a lot more enthusiasm and joy than those of most other contemporary composers, and that despite many arrangements sounding a bit sterile. Newman on the other hand seemed many times out of his depth in SF´s action scenes. Arnold is generic, yes, but he sounds at home there, he manages to make even generic tunes sound great.
    Doesn´t mean I wouldn´t be happier with another composer ;-).
  • SatoriousSatorious Brushing up on a little Danish
    Posts: 219
    This kinda hits the nail on the head for me! I rather like Newman's quieter/subtle/mood material. His action falls flat and never feels confident or bold enough (but I like that he shows a bit of restraint - something Arnold lacks). I think there are better fitting Bond composers out there personally. To be honest - I wouldn't be sad to see composers come and go quicker so they can bring new ideas/styles to the tables - a bit like the film directors.
  • WalecsWalecs On Her Majesty's Secret Service
    Posts: 3,157
    JWESTBROOK wrote: »
    Walecs wrote: »
    Getafix wrote: »
    That tells us very little.

    Would have been keen to know how Newman has incorporated it into the film.

    The only morsel of new info is Mendes saying the songs helps with the storytelling, which is perhaps a tiny indication it will appear during the film, a la WHATTITW.
    So is it confirmed that it will appear?

    What part of that sounds like confirmation?

    He spoke of Newman incorporating WOTW as a certainty.
  • Walecs wrote: »
    JWESTBROOK wrote: »
    Walecs wrote: »
    Getafix wrote: »
    That tells us very little.

    Would have been keen to know how Newman has incorporated it into the film.

    The only morsel of new info is Mendes saying the songs helps with the storytelling, which is perhaps a tiny indication it will appear during the film, a la WHATTITW.
    So is it confirmed that it will appear?

    What part of that sounds like confirmation?

    He spoke of Newman incorporating WOTW as a certainty.

    I didn't get that sense at all. I think he just means the song itself helps the storytelling because it is very much a song about the movie.
  • Posts: 1,359
    Fraid I'm old school and just want the James Bond theme played in full just once during the film. After that Newman can do whatever he wants.
  • 00Ralf00Ralf Germany
    Posts: 149
    @delfloria
    I fully agree. It's something I'be always looked forward to in a Bond movie and the Craig era has been particularly weak when it comes to this.
    In Casino I first didn't like the lack of it during the film, but then I realised what a perfect timing it was to play it in that epic final scene.
    It didn't feature in Quantum and thus time using it for the end credits didn't work.
    In Skyfall we got snippets of it, but never the full Da Da Da Daaaaa Da Da Da, which to me is the crucial point in the theme. The perfect moment would've been when Bond uses the digger to change carriages. Those typical Bond moments are the difference between an action sequence and a Bond action sequence and they deserve the use of the best piece of music on earth.
    If we get the full theme in SPECTRE, I will melt because of excitement in my cinema seat.
  • AceHoleAceHole Belgium, via Britain
    Posts: 1,726
    delfloria wrote: »
    Fraid I'm old school and just want the James Bond theme played in full just once during the film. After that Newman can do whatever he wants.

    Agreed. Though I do like it being musically 'hinted at' in the PTS and perhaps one or two of the early scenes.
    But the full-on Bond Brass section & guitar should only be used once, in one triumphant scene. Otherwise it just feels forced & amateurish.
    TND had way too much of it, it just irked.
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