Music Composers you would like to see score a Bond film

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  • edited August 2018 Posts: 5,767
    0iker0 wrote: »
    boldfinger wrote: »
    As brilliant as Desplat can be with quieter tracks, as lost does he seem with action cues. The only halfway decent music he did in that direction was for Godzilla.

    Pemberton has brilliant ideas but has yet to produce a whole score that is at least interesting and does not fall asleep throughout.

    A few good ideas or tracks do not make a good composer. But unfortunately it has become common that a film soundtrack contains a few good tracks and a lot of garbage.

    That last bit, the bit that I just bolded is my problem with Brian Tyler precisely. I find that he has a something to create main themes or specifical tracks, but then he can't back it up. I like his Iron Man theme, for instance, but I don't like the entirety of his score for the film. (I love his F1 theme, despite not being love at first sight)

    Desplat is brilliant at everything he does. Not only quieter bits. The action pieces for Valerian, Monument's Men (the finale), Deadly Hallows part 2 (the magnificent Statues), The Ghost Writer (chase on the Ferry is a fine chase track) are pretty damn good if you ask me.

    Regarding Pemberton, he certainly has ideas. And I don't like all of them, I didn't like his score for King Arthur for instance. But, he is capable of bringing good action cues and substance together. He did that with UNCLE, he did that with Ocean's 8 (not brilliant, but still a good jazzy score, respecting the franchise's style).
    How tastes vary ;-). I enjoy listening to the whole of Tyler´s CD releases for Iron Man 3 and Thor 2, while Desplat and Pemberton make me tune out after 15-20min.



    @CraigMooreOHMSS, I wasn´t aware of the Madsonic thing, that´s interesting.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    Marianelli (mentioned above) is one who has continued to impress me. I posted a few clips of his score from Everest on the top of page 8 of this thread. He has skills.

    Desplat would be fantastic imho. Pemberton would be decent too but as I've mentioned before, I sometimes feel that his scores overshadow and distract from the proceedings on screen, rather than compliment the visuals.
  • RoadphillRoadphill United Kingdom
    Posts: 984
    Surprised no one has mentioned Junkie KL. Apart from having a bloody stupid moniker, he is a pretty good composer.

    He delivered a cracking score for the otherwise execrable Dark Tower.
  • Posts: 501
    I'm not convinced about Junkie's style. Don't get me wrong, I do like his Mad Max score, for instance, but I don't think he would suit Bond
  • Posts: 19,339
    David Arnold.
  • zebrafishzebrafish <°)))< in Octopussy's garden in the shade
    Posts: 4,312
    Today it was announced that Cary Fukanaga will direct Bond 25.

    I would suggest to move all discussion on who might score the next Bond to this thread. Also, the first speculations already arise whether Fukanaga will bring in Dan Romer for the score (people are way ahead of things, as usual). So what do we think about this guy?

    A quick sampling on Spotify/Deezer etc. lets me conclude that Romer prefers electronic music and small string ensemble. Not a good fit in my opinion. What do others think?
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    I think someone mentioned Carter Burwell here before. I would be fine with that.
  • Posts: 6,710
    So would I. His style is somewhat similar to John Barry's, as he was a fan of him in his teens. The sometimes quirky-sounding themes and arrangements, the highly atmospheric and hypnotic suspense music, and even the melodic approach to action scoring, are some of the similarities between the composers. The score of 1997's The Jackal is one of my favorites of Burwell.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 8,026
    mattjoes wrote: »
    So would I. His style is somewhat similar to John Barry's, as he was a fan of him in his teens. The sometimes quirky-sounding themes and arrangements, the highly atmospheric and hypnotic suspense music, and even the melodic approach to action scoring, are some of the similarities between the composers. The score of 1997's The Jackal is one of my favorites of Burwell.

    Burwell also provided additional music for Mercury Rising, which was of course composed by Barry.
  • Posts: 6,710
    mattjoes wrote: »
    So would I. His style is somewhat similar to John Barry's, as he was a fan of him in his teens. The sometimes quirky-sounding themes and arrangements, the highly atmospheric and hypnotic suspense music, and even the melodic approach to action scoring, are some of the similarities between the composers. The score of 1997's The Jackal is one of my favorites of Burwell.

    Burwell also provided additional music for Mercury Rising, which was of course composed by Barry.

    You're right, I'd forgotten about that!
  • TripAcesTripAces Universal Exports
    Posts: 4,554
    I think someone mentioned Carter Burwell here before. I would be fine with that.

    Me too. Burwell did the music for And the Band Played On, which is some of the most stirring, haunting film music I have ever heard:



    Burwell's style can sometimes emulate Howard Shore, whom I would also be fine with.
  • TripAcesTripAces Universal Exports
    Posts: 4,554
    It seems to me that CJF might go a little more experimental with the score, perhaps an up-and-comer. It's possible that he could go with someone like Ramin Djawadi (another HBO alum).

  • WillardWhyteWillardWhyte Midnight Society #ProjectMoon
    Posts: 784
    Alan Silvestri
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited October 2018 Posts: 23,883
    zebrafish wrote: »
    Today it was announced that Cary Fukanaga will direct Bond 25.

    I would suggest to move all discussion on who might score the next Bond to this thread. Also, the first speculations already arise whether Fukanaga will bring in Dan Romer for the score (people are way ahead of things, as usual). So what do we think about this guy?

    A quick sampling on Spotify/Deezer etc. lets me conclude that Romer prefers electronic music and small string ensemble. Not a good fit in my opinion. What do others think?
    I'm currently viewing Fukunaga's Maniac. One thing which stands out for me positively is Dan Romer's score. It's quirky and mysterious, like the show. I of course don't have enough to go on, but so far I'm open to him.



    TripAces wrote: »
    It seems to me that CJF might go a little more experimental with the score, perhaps an up-and-comer. It's possible that he could go with someone like Ramin Djawadi (another HBO alum).
    I've been championing Djawadi for years. I wouldn't say that he's an up-and-comer any more though. He fills stadiums globally with his GoT concert and is well known in the composer community. I think he could deliver a killer score for Bond.
    Alan Silvestri
    He'd certainly be very good too.
  • DaltonCraig007DaltonCraig007 They say, "Evil prevails when good men fail to act." What they ought to say is, "Evil prevails."
    edited October 2018 Posts: 15,690
    @bondjames

    A track from Hans Zimmer's OST for Widows (the heist film with Viola Davies and Liam Neeson). He's still got the goods:

  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    @DaltonCraig007, thanks for the clip. It's a slightly different sound for him (I wouldn't have guessed at first that it was Zimmer) but I like it. I'm sure it will fit the scene like a glove and elevate it, which is what he does so well.

    He hasn't been as prolific of late, or if he has I've perhaps not seen the films he's composed. I was looking forward to Widows before, but now am doubly so.
  • Posts: 3,333
    I think those suggesting that Fukanaga will somehow bring in some little-known composer for B25 are forgetting that this isn't his own production to make those kind of calls with—it's Barbara Broccoli's. After all, was Marc Forster given carte blanche to bring in Alberto Iglesias, Asche & Spencer or Britt Daniel because he'd worked with them before QoS? Er, no. The fact that Mendes was allowed to bring in previously Oscar nominated Thomas Newman to score SF (and I emphasise previously Oscar nominated), doesn't necessarily mean that every director is going to be given the same artistic freedom to run the production like his very own personal train set.
  • TripAcesTripAces Universal Exports
    Posts: 4,554
    bondsum wrote: »
    I think those suggesting that Fukanaga will somehow bring in some little-known composer for B25 are forgetting that this isn't his own production to make those kind of calls with—it's Barbara Broccoli's. After all, was Marc Forster given carte blanche to bring in Alberto Iglesias, Asche & Spencer or Britt Daniel because he'd worked with them before QoS? Er, no. The fact that Mendes was allowed to bring in previously Oscar nominated Thomas Newman to score SF (and I emphasise previously Oscar nominated), doesn't necessarily mean that every director is going to be given the same artistic freedom to run the production like his very own personal train set.

    True. But the composer they settle on will need to match both the tone of the film and CJF's style. I don't see Arnold, Newman, or even Zimmer being that person. But I can be wrong. At the same time, CJF is not going to ask to bring in a nobody, either. It would be a composer with cred, but also with a style and sound that suits the film.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    TripAces wrote: »
    bondsum wrote: »
    I think those suggesting that Fukanaga will somehow bring in some little-known composer for B25 are forgetting that this isn't his own production to make those kind of calls with—it's Barbara Broccoli's. After all, was Marc Forster given carte blanche to bring in Alberto Iglesias, Asche & Spencer or Britt Daniel because he'd worked with them before QoS? Er, no. The fact that Mendes was allowed to bring in previously Oscar nominated Thomas Newman to score SF (and I emphasise previously Oscar nominated), doesn't necessarily mean that every director is going to be given the same artistic freedom to run the production like his very own personal train set.

    True. But the composer they settle on will need to match both the tone of the film and CJF's style. I don't see Arnold, Newman, or even Zimmer being that person. But I can be wrong. At the same time, CJF is not going to ask to bring in a nobody, either. It would be a composer with cred, but also with a style and sound that suits the film.
    Based on what I've seen of his work, I think this is key. I too believe the music in B25 will blend with the visuals in a holistic manner. I've yet to draw an overall opinion on Fukunaga, but he seems to get the basics right.
  • edited October 2018 Posts: 3,333
    TripAces wrote: »
    True. But the composer they settle on will need to match both the tone of the film and CJF's style. I don't see Arnold, Newman, or even Zimmer being that person. But I can be wrong. At the same time, CJF is not going to ask to bring in a nobody, either. It would be a composer with cred, but also with a style and sound that suits the film.
    I personally don't think Fukunaga will be too far removed visually and tonally than from what we got with Marc Foster, in all honesty. Put it another way, I'm not expecting an experimental work of art. The exception will hopefully be in a much-improved story that doesn't feel edited down for speed and is better executed. If I was Fukunaga, I'd want to show every other director that I too can mix-it-up with the big boys and deliver a bona fide hit movie, just like Christopher McQuarrie and Mendes managed to achieve by moving away from their more highbrow offerings. B25 will be his chance to show that.

    Oh, I can't abide Zimmer. I find his music instantly forgettable, just as do Newman's.
  • Posts: 6,710
    Zimmer is not without talent but often his music is indeed forgettable and can feel a bit wallpaper-ish. I also have the impression in films like Batman he seems to barely use any woodwinds. It's always just strings, synths and those drums. It can feel a bit monotonous.
  • Posts: 5,767
    Zimmer is a strong Sound sculptor and a weak Composer, so naturally his scores tend to Sound a bit monotonous after a while.
  • TripAcesTripAces Universal Exports
    edited October 2018 Posts: 4,554
    FWIW, Clint Mansell is my dark horse pick. He's a really strong candidate who's flying under the radar.

  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 8,026
    TripAces wrote: »
    FWIW, Clint Mansell is my dark horse pick. He's a really strong candidate who's flying under the radar.


    I like Mansell, too. He did some strong brassy work on SAHARA, which I think I posted a few pages back. Here it is again, regardless.

  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    I've never heard of Mansell before but both those tracks above aren't bad. The first one is a bit Newmanesque (particularly the Passengers score, which I really like) and the second one sounds more like Arnold's work for Bond (and CR/QoS in particular).
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    edited October 2018 Posts: 8,026
    Mansell has dabbled in a variety of styles, mostly successfully. He can do ambient, he can also orchestra, and he can do a sort of rock band-ish, edgy electronic sound thanks to his own singing background (he was the lead singer in a band called Pop Will Eat Itself).







  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited October 2018 Posts: 23,883
    Mansell has dabbled in a variety of styles, mostly successfully. He can do ambient, he can also orchestra, and he can do a sort of rock band-ish, edgy electronic sound thanks to his own singing background (he was the lead singer in a band called Pop Will Eat Itself).
    He definitely seems to be quite versatile. I can't detect anything specific running through the clips you posted above. They all seem quite distinct and could have been composed by different people to my ears. Normally I can tell who the composer is because there are elements which which stand out similarly in their tracks, but this does not appear to be the case here.
  • bondjames wrote: »
    I've never heard of Mansell before but both those tracks above aren't bad. The first one is a bit Newmanesque (particularly the Passengers score, which I really like) and the second one sounds more like Arnold's work for Bond (and CR/QoS in particular).

    And there’s a good reason for that: Mansell’s orchestrator on Sahara was the same as Arnold’s—Nicholas Dodd. I’m sure Dodd helped give Mansell’s writing that action movie feel.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 8,026
    bondjames wrote: »
    I've never heard of Mansell before but both those tracks above aren't bad. The first one is a bit Newmanesque (particularly the Passengers score, which I really like) and the second one sounds more like Arnold's work for Bond (and CR/QoS in particular).

    And there’s a good reason for that: Mansell’s orchestrator on Sahara was the same as Arnold’s—Nicholas Dodd. I’m sure Dodd helped give Mansell’s writing that action movie feel.

    Dodd is one of the best in the biz.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    bondjames wrote: »
    I've never heard of Mansell before but both those tracks above aren't bad. The first one is a bit Newmanesque (particularly the Passengers score, which I really like) and the second one sounds more like Arnold's work for Bond (and CR/QoS in particular).

    And there’s a good reason for that: Mansell’s orchestrator on Sahara was the same as Arnold’s—Nicholas Dodd. I’m sure Dodd helped give Mansell’s writing that action movie feel.

    Dodd is one of the best in the biz.
    Well I learned something new today. There's a definite late Arnold action vibe to that Sahara clip.
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