SPECTRE: It grossed $880 Million Worldwide (..and 2015 was the biggest box office year so far)

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  • edited November 2015 Posts: 1,055
    bondjames wrote: »
    That means SP is currently 7th on the highest grossing films of all time in the UK and that's after just 2 weeks of release.

    Clearly by the end of it's cinematic run, it's going to be, at bare minimum, 3rd on the all time list.
    What I want to know is whether it will dethrone SF. SF holds the #1 slot and no other franchise has ever succeeded itself at the top of the roost, so it will be interesting to see.

    The fall off in the UK market is going to be another key determinant of how this film is looked back on. It opened huge, so let's see how it lasts. Hunger Games is not a challenge in the UK, unlike the US, so it should be able to continue holding...

    Well if you look at the figures for the 2nd week......SP did extremely well, and over the 2nd weekend only dropped 29%..........film has already passed the $100 mil mark.
    SP doing better than i thought it would do at this point..............maybe down to the fact this weekend............weather in UK was truly awful.......so bored people, went to the cinema!

    Regarding the US market, i still find it strange why the studio released the film, same weekend against a big family film.........should of opened SP a week earlier when there was virtually no competition, also this would of given the film an extra week before if faces the Hunger games film............maybe studio thought, opening film closer to Thanksgiving was gonna be better!

  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited November 2015 Posts: 23,883
    mepal1 wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    That means SP is currently 7th on the highest grossing films of all time in the UK and that's after just 2 weeks of release.

    Clearly by the end of it's cinematic run, it's going to be, at bare minimum, 3rd on the all time list.
    What I want to know is whether it will dethrone SF. SF holds the #1 slot and no other franchise has ever succeeded itself at the top of the roost, so it will be interesting to see.

    The fall off in the UK market is going to be another key determinant of how this film is looked back on. It opened huge, so let's see how it lasts. Hunger Games is not a challenge in the UK, unlike the US, so it should be able to continue holding...

    Well if you look at the figures for the 2nd week......SP did extremely well, and over the 2nd weekend only dropped 29%..........film has already passed the $100 mil mark.
    SP doing better than i thought it would do at this point..............maybe down to the fact this weekend............weather in UK was truly awful.......so bored people, went to the cinema!

    Regarding the US market, i still find it strange why the studio released the film, same weekend against a big family film.........should of opened SP a week earlier when there was virtually no competition, also this would of given the film an extra week before if faces the Hunger games film............maybe studio thought, opening film closer to Thanksgiving was gonna be better!

    They did this, imho, to try and duplicate what happened with SF. As I mentioned a few weeks back, SF opened huge on the back of exceptional UK reviews, which populated RT for about a week or so, and then when it came to the US, the reviewers did the same and the film took off.

    They obviously wanted to try and replicate this. There were two problems with the strategy imho:
    1. US reviewers were not so kind with this film, despite glowing overall UK reviews
    2. the public doesn't seem to be jumping up and down for the most part over it in the US either (tracking social media)
  • Posts: 1,055
    bondjames wrote: »
    mepal1 wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    That means SP is currently 7th on the highest grossing films of all time in the UK and that's after just 2 weeks of release.

    Clearly by the end of it's cinematic run, it's going to be, at bare minimum, 3rd on the all time list.
    What I want to know is whether it will dethrone SF. SF holds the #1 slot and no other franchise has ever succeeded itself at the top of the roost, so it will be interesting to see.

    The fall off in the UK market is going to be another key determinant of how this film is looked back on. It opened huge, so let's see how it lasts. Hunger Games is not a challenge in the UK, unlike the US, so it should be able to continue holding...

    Well if you look at the figures for the 2nd week......SP did extremely well, and over the 2nd weekend only dropped 29%..........film has already passed the $100 mil mark.
    SP doing better than i thought it would do at this point..............maybe down to the fact this weekend............weather in UK was truly awful.......so bored people, went to the cinema!

    Regarding the US market, i still find it strange why the studio released the film, same weekend against a big family film.........should of opened SP a week earlier when there was virtually no competition, also this would of given the film an extra week before if faces the Hunger games film............maybe studio thought, opening film closer to Thanksgiving was gonna be better!

    They did this, imho, to try and duplicate what happened with SF. As I mentioned a few weeks back, SF opened huge on the back of exceptional UK reviews, which populated RT for about a week or so, and then when it came to the US, the reviewers did the same and the film took off.

    They obviously wanted to try and replicate this. There were two problems with the strategy imho:
    1. US reviewers were not so kind with this film, despite glowing overall UK reviews
    2. the public doesn't seem to be jumping up and down for the most part over it in the US either (tracking social media)

    That's true, but SF didn't have any major film opening same weekend............hopefully the adults in the families who took their kids to see 'Peanuts', will go and see SP at a later date...........in fact that is what Sony have pretty much said in an article i read to day.....is that the studio thinks the audience for SP will be spread out over a few weeks, and will go and see the film when they have the time.

  • edited November 2015 Posts: 1,055
    oops duplicate post!

  • mepal1 wrote: »

    Regarding the US market, i still find it strange why the studio released the film, same weekend against a big family film.........should of opened SP a week earlier when there was virtually no competition, also this would of given the film an extra week before if faces the Hunger games film............maybe studio thought, opening film closer to Thanksgiving was gonna be better!

    Actually I think a week earlier would have been a major mistake, it was Halloween that weekend. Box office is very low then, so studios only release B-movies and leftover junk like "Scouts guide to the zombie apocalypse"(!). Spectre's opening numbers definitely would have taken a hit on the Saturday.
  • Posts: 1,055
    dinovelvet wrote: »
    mepal1 wrote: »

    Regarding the US market, i still find it strange why the studio released the film, same weekend against a big family film.........should of opened SP a week earlier when there was virtually no competition, also this would of given the film an extra week before if faces the Hunger games film............maybe studio thought, opening film closer to Thanksgiving was gonna be better!

    Actually I think a week earlier would have been a major mistake, it was Halloween that weekend. Box office is very low then, so studios only release B-movies and leftover junk like "Scouts guide to the zombie apocalypse"(!). Spectre's opening numbers definitely would have taken a hit on the Saturday.

    Good point..........i forgot about Halloween! :)
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited November 2015 Posts: 23,883
    mepal1 wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    mepal1 wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    That means SP is currently 7th on the highest grossing films of all time in the UK and that's after just 2 weeks of release.

    Clearly by the end of it's cinematic run, it's going to be, at bare minimum, 3rd on the all time list.
    What I want to know is whether it will dethrone SF. SF holds the #1 slot and no other franchise has ever succeeded itself at the top of the roost, so it will be interesting to see.

    The fall off in the UK market is going to be another key determinant of how this film is looked back on. It opened huge, so let's see how it lasts. Hunger Games is not a challenge in the UK, unlike the US, so it should be able to continue holding...

    Well if you look at the figures for the 2nd week......SP did extremely well, and over the 2nd weekend only dropped 29%..........film has already passed the $100 mil mark.
    SP doing better than i thought it would do at this point..............maybe down to the fact this weekend............weather in UK was truly awful.......so bored people, went to the cinema!

    Regarding the US market, i still find it strange why the studio released the film, same weekend against a big family film.........should of opened SP a week earlier when there was virtually no competition, also this would of given the film an extra week before if faces the Hunger games film............maybe studio thought, opening film closer to Thanksgiving was gonna be better!

    They did this, imho, to try and duplicate what happened with SF. As I mentioned a few weeks back, SF opened huge on the back of exceptional UK reviews, which populated RT for about a week or so, and then when it came to the US, the reviewers did the same and the film took off.

    They obviously wanted to try and replicate this. There were two problems with the strategy imho:
    1. US reviewers were not so kind with this film, despite glowing overall UK reviews
    2. the public doesn't seem to be jumping up and down for the most part over it in the US either (tracking social media)

    That's true, but SF didn't have any major film opening same weekend............hopefully the adults in the families who took their kids to see 'Peanuts', will go and see SP at a later date...........in fact that is what Sony have pretty much said in an article i read to day.....is that the studio thinks the audience for SP will be spread out over a few weeks, and will go and see the film when they have the time.

    That's true and Bond traditionally does that in the US market (gross is spread out quite nicely over many weeks unlike other blockbusters).

    Our (meaning us nothing better to do obsessives on this site, myself included) modelling suggested that this one was going to be more front loaded though due to the SF factor, and that it needed to be due to the increased competition in week 3..

    So I wonder where that leaves us now, with a relatively weak open and the potential of a steep fall off in week 3 when HG grabs most of the IMAX theatres.
  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 on fb and ajb
    Posts: 9,021
    I wonder what people mean by "weak opening".

    SF had the 50th Anniversary, and no matter how many times it gets denied, that made up a huge chunk of the BO result.

    SP's 73 million opening in the US (if that's the final number) is nothing less than a huge success. There are 24 movies in this franchise.
    Now go figure where SP lands in the ranking with those 73 million.

    And even if SP fails to do the billion (not by much I would guess, if at all) then it will be a spectacular success, just look at other franchises like MI or recent ones like Hunger Games.

    What a lot of people have to get into their head is that SPECTRE will become the second highest grossing Bond movie, and probably with a huge gap to the third highest grossing one.

    Needless to say that in most European countries the first weekend has broken SF's records and Switzerland it seems, has the same numbers with SP than with SF, which would tie those two movies with being the most successful ever in Switzerland (Swiss movies not counted).
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited November 2015 Posts: 23,883
    Weak in relation to SF.

    Prior to this week, predictions were that this was going to shatter SF's records. Witness the thread title and number of pages of discussion.

    The opening is likely below that of QoS (yes, QoS) in inflation adjusted terms. It's weak. No two ways about it. Ticket prices are higher and QoS did not have as many theatres to open in, nor did it have IMAX or other higher priced ticket contrivances.
  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 on fb and ajb
    Posts: 9,021
    bondjames wrote: »
    Weak in relation to SF.

    Prior to this week, predictions were that this was going to shatter SF's records. Witness the thread title and number of pages of discussion.

    The opening is likely below that of QoS (yes, QoS) in inflation adjusted terms. It's weak. No two ways about it. Ticket prices are higher and QoS did not have as many theatres to open in, nor did it have IMAX or other higher priced ticket contrivances.

    The only way to measure the success of SF and SP in comparison would be tickets sold.
    Sadly, the US still refuses to give such numbers.
    Fortunately in Europe this is different.

    We'll see in the end how SP really did in comparison to SF in countries like Germany for instance where tickets prices actually are almost the same as in 2012. And I believe that is true for most of Europe by the way.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited November 2015 Posts: 23,883
    If you're comparing on a ticket basis vs. SF in the US, it's getting decimated already.

    I agree this is the proper measure to use, but such information is not available, because Hollywood can then keep using $ for marketing purposes even though it's a false discussion.
  • edited November 2015 Posts: 1,985
    bondjames wrote: »
    I mentioned this before SP was released and I stand by it. The US market will dictate how SP is viewed overall when the story is written on it (six months from now when the studio negotiations kick in).

    Funny. It's been 50 years that the best counter-example of this fuzzy theory is the Bond franchise :) Eh, Goldfinger was never #1 weekly in USA, surely all this "Bond phenomenom" is nonsense :)



  • edited November 2015 Posts: 425
    dinovelvet wrote: »
    Germany biggest Saturday of all time
    Territories with a record best-ever for a November release include Austria, Germany, Italy, Turkey, Chile, and Bahrain.

    That's by far NOT the case in Germany.

    Best opening weekends (thu - sun) in November in Germany (admissions):
    1. Harry Potter 1 (2.590.464)
    2. Harry Potter 2 (2.489.952)
    3. Harry Potter 4 (2.400.158)
    4. Finding Nemo (2.032.136)
    5. Skyfall (1.907.746)

    Spectre is on course to have about 1.875.000 million admissions (incl. previews from wednesday).
    So it's far from a new November record.

    Here you have all weekend and first week records for every month in Germany:

    http://www.insidekino.de/DJahr/DBOStartrekordMonat.htm

    And here you get all weekend- and week-records in one list:

    http://www.insidekino.de/DJahr/DBOStartrekord.htm
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited November 2015 Posts: 23,883
    bondjames wrote: »
    I mentioned this before SP was released and I stand by it. The US market will dictate how SP is viewed overall when the story is written on it (six months from now when the studio negotiations kick in).

    Funny. It's been 50 years that the best counter-example of this fuzzy theory is the Bond franchise :) Eh, Goldfinger was never #1 weekly in USA, surely all this "Bond phenomenom" is nonsense :)
    not relevant. GF was like SF. A US phenomenon compared to what had come before from the franchise in terms of relative US success. Furthermore, GF was 3 movies in. SP is 24 movies in.

    This has nothing to do with the Bond phenomenon. Bond will continue no matter what and be as secure as ever no matter what.

    We are talking specifically about SP and how SP will be viewed (in relation to other Bond films, and particularly the Craig films) when everything is said and done (box office wise, critically irrespective of box office, and how it's depicted by the media....either as a TDKR or a TDK, or a QoS or SF even).
  • Posts: 1,055
    bondjames wrote: »
    I mentioned this before SP was released and I stand by it. The US market will dictate how SP is viewed overall when the story is written on it (six months from now when the studio negotiations kick in).

    Funny. It's been 50 years that the best counter-example of this fuzzy theory is the Bond franchise :) Eh, Goldfinger was never #1 weekly in USA, surely all this "Bond phenomenom" is nonsense :)

    Eh!......is that true?.........because 'GF' was in the Guinness book of records for years as the fastest earning film ever in the North American market.

    Yes, 'Bondmania' did exist in the mid 60's............you only have to look at the admission figures for the Bond films of this era, which dwarf those of today's Bond films, even SF....and also taking into account the fact that there were a lot less people on the planet then!

  • edited November 2015 Posts: 1,985
    bondjames wrote: »
    not relevant.

    Not relevant except as a counter-example of what you've written :)
    bondjames wrote: »
    We are talking specifically about SP and how SP will be viewed (in relation to other Bond films, and particularly the Craig films) when everything is said and done (box office wise, critically irrespective of box office, and how it's depicted by the media....either as a TDKR or a TDK).

    Let me dare to mention a multi-layered, deep, complex hypothesis that may shatter your view of the the world : there may be no such thing as "the narrative", and for instance the opinion about a movie may be different across countries.
    mepal1 wrote: »
    Eh!......is that true?.........because 'GF' was in the Guinness book of records for years as the fastest earning film ever in the North American market.

    Yes it's true. But it's actually meaningless. As is all the "comments" from experts who have failed to predict anything happening right now.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited November 2015 Posts: 23,883
    bondjames wrote: »
    not relevant.

    Not relevant except as a counter-example of what you've written :)

    Then pick a better, more comparable example.
    Let me dare to mention a multi-layered, deep, complex hypothesis that may shatter your view of the the world : there may be no such thing as "the narrative", and for instance the opinion about a movie may be different across countries.
    Of course it will differ across countries. Nobody said otherwise. It would be foolish to assume otherwise.

    However, the US depiction will take precedence when it's all said and done. It always does.

    There may be an overall 'narrative' or there may not be. I'm not as certain either way as you appear to be.
  • bondjames wrote: »
    However, the US depiction will take precedence when it's all said and done. It always does.

    Except, in particular, for the Bond franchise !
    You know, the franchise who always ranked higher WW than in the USA, and for which the producer never wanted a US director...


  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited November 2015 Posts: 23,883
    bondjames wrote: »
    However, the US depiction will take precedence when it's all said and done. It always does.

    Except, in particular, for the Bond franchise !
    You know, the franchise who always ranked higher WW than in the USA, and for which the producer never wanted a US director...
    True, it's a uniquely British franchise (culturally), but it's a franchise that still wants the US box office and inevitable marketing power that comes from that success. LTK being the prime example, and Dalton's demise, courtesy of the MGM chief reportedly not wanting him and choosing American friendly Brosnan.

    Bottom line - this film will do fine, and should beat MI-RN globally.

    I want to know if that's good enough for it to be deemed a success or not. As I said before, we'll know in about six months. It's too early to know now..
  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 on fb and ajb
    Posts: 9,021
    bondjames wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    However, the US depiction will take precedence when it's all said and done. It always does.

    Except, in particular, for the Bond franchise !
    You know, the franchise who always ranked higher WW than in the USA, and for which the producer never wanted a US director...
    True, it's a uniquely British franchise (culturally), but it's a franchise that still wants the box office and inevitable marketing power that comes from that success. LTK being the prime example, and Dalton's demise, courtesy of MGM not wanting him and choosing American friendly Brosnan.

    Bottom line - this film will do fine, and should beat MI-RN globally.

    I want to know if that's good enough for it to be deemed a success or not. As I said before, we'll know in about six months. It's too early to know now..

    Now you are talking nonsense, Dalton's demise, such words make me cringe.
    The third movie was already planned for 1991 and it is well known what problems prevented that from being happening.
    Furthermore Dalton was asked back but he himself declined for feeling he was already to old for it.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited November 2015 Posts: 23,883
    bondjames wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    However, the US depiction will take precedence when it's all said and done. It always does.

    Except, in particular, for the Bond franchise !
    You know, the franchise who always ranked higher WW than in the USA, and for which the producer never wanted a US director...
    True, it's a uniquely British franchise (culturally), but it's a franchise that still wants the box office and inevitable marketing power that comes from that success. LTK being the prime example, and Dalton's demise, courtesy of MGM not wanting him and choosing American friendly Brosnan.

    Bottom line - this film will do fine, and should beat MI-RN globally.

    I want to know if that's good enough for it to be deemed a success or not. As I said before, we'll know in about six months. It's too early to know now..

    Now you are talking nonsense, Dalton's demise, such words make me cringe.
    The third movie was already planned for 1991 and it is well known what problems prevented that from being happening.
    Furthermore Dalton was asked back but he himself declined for feeling he was already to old for it.
    The MGM chief reportedly wanted him out before the 3rd film came out (there was a push for Brosnan to take over). It's on this site, with a link to an article, on one of the Dalton threads.

    He officially resigned however, that's true.

    I know you like him, but this has been reported.
  • Or maybe you have a US-centric view of the 'narrative' :)
  • Posts: 1,055
    bondjames wrote: »
    Weak in relation to SF.

    Prior to this week, predictions were that this was going to shatter SF's records. Witness the thread title and number of pages of discussion.

    The opening is likely below that of QoS (yes, QoS) in inflation adjusted terms. It's weak. No two ways about it. Ticket prices are higher and QoS did not have as many theatres to open in, nor did it have IMAX or other higher priced ticket contrivances.

    The only way to measure the success of SF and SP in comparison would be tickets sold.
    Sadly, the US still refuses to give such numbers.
    Fortunately in Europe this is different.

    We'll see in the end how SP really did in comparison to SF in countries like Germany for instance where tickets prices actually are almost the same as in 2012. And I believe that is true for most of Europe by the way.

    You can find admission figures for films in the US, even at BOM, but they are usually estimates.

    Incidently........the German speaking region of Switzerland, produced an opening of $4.1 mil (including previews), which is quite stunning, considering only a few people live there! :))

    One thing about the UK BO, the ticket prices here are quite high, i mean £10 ($15) for an adult ticket, outside of London, maybe cheaper in the more remote areas of the UK.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited November 2015 Posts: 23,883
    Or maybe you have a US-centric view of the 'narrative' :)
    Yes, my view would definitely be more US centric, as I'm in North America, and English speaking. The major publications/sites/forums that I read are all in English (British and American).

    At the moment, the US reviewers have skewed too negative in their RT rankings of this film imho, but their criticisms are not unwarranted in many cases. The rating probably should be closer to the mid/high 70's, closer to the user rating.

    As I said on this thread earlier, I don't see a 'narrative' yet because the film had justifiable flaws, having seen it.

    There will inevitably be one (a narrative) in six months, just like SF had one (great) and QoS had one (poor). We'll touch base again on this then.

  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 on fb and ajb
    Posts: 9,021
    bondjames wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    However, the US depiction will take precedence when it's all said and done. It always does.

    Except, in particular, for the Bond franchise !
    You know, the franchise who always ranked higher WW than in the USA, and for which the producer never wanted a US director...
    True, it's a uniquely British franchise (culturally), but it's a franchise that still wants the box office and inevitable marketing power that comes from that success. LTK being the prime example, and Dalton's demise, courtesy of MGM not wanting him and choosing American friendly Brosnan.

    Bottom line - this film will do fine, and should beat MI-RN globally.

    I want to know if that's good enough for it to be deemed a success or not. As I said before, we'll know in about six months. It's too early to know now..

    Now you are talking nonsense, Dalton's demise, such words make me cringe.
    The third movie was already planned for 1991 and it is well known what problems prevented that from being happening.
    Furthermore Dalton was asked back but he himself declined for feeling he was already to old for it.
    The MGM chief reportedly wanted him out before the 3rd film came out (there was a push for Brosnan to take over). It's on this site, with a link to an article, on one of the Dalton threads.

    He officially resigned however, that's true.

    I know you like him, but this has been reported.

    The MGM chief could have wanted Dame Edna Everage as Bond, in the end Cubby decided and nobody else and he decided to continue with Dalton.
  • Posts: 444
    No one would dispute the need for a favourable box office performance from the US to keep the Bond franchise in a healthy state but let's face it ever since CR was trounced by Happy Feet in the opening week I don't think we're looking to America to deduce the best future direction of the series.

    Brosnan certainly was American friendly, conversely Remington Steel was a bit of a flop in the UK and no-one here was clamouring for him to be Bond, but now the series has a 'local boy' again with Craig it's no surprise that they're gradually stepping away from Bond in favour of MI and Bourne.

    It's if the next Bond film or Bond actor will have a dismal showing in the first week at the UK that will be the most damning.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited November 2015 Posts: 23,883
    bondjames wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    However, the US depiction will take precedence when it's all said and done. It always does.

    Except, in particular, for the Bond franchise !
    You know, the franchise who always ranked higher WW than in the USA, and for which the producer never wanted a US director...
    True, it's a uniquely British franchise (culturally), but it's a franchise that still wants the box office and inevitable marketing power that comes from that success. LTK being the prime example, and Dalton's demise, courtesy of MGM not wanting him and choosing American friendly Brosnan.

    Bottom line - this film will do fine, and should beat MI-RN globally.

    I want to know if that's good enough for it to be deemed a success or not. As I said before, we'll know in about six months. It's too early to know now..

    Now you are talking nonsense, Dalton's demise, such words make me cringe.
    The third movie was already planned for 1991 and it is well known what problems prevented that from being happening.
    Furthermore Dalton was asked back but he himself declined for feeling he was already to old for it.
    The MGM chief reportedly wanted him out before the 3rd film came out (there was a push for Brosnan to take over). It's on this site, with a link to an article, on one of the Dalton threads.

    He officially resigned however, that's true.

    I know you like him, but this has been reported.

    The MGM chief could have wanted Dame Edna Everage as Bond, in the end Cubby decided and nobody else and he decided to continue with Dalton.

    Yes, that's true, until Dalton officially resigned.
  • Posts: 444
    The strange thing about Dalton was that interview he gave for the Bondage fan magazine whilst still filming LTK and saying he felt this would be the last of the series.

    So he was resigned to being finished as Bond in early 1989 before the film was even released and underperformed.

  • Posts: 1,055
    Cowley wrote: »
    No one would dispute the need for a favourable box office performance from the US to keep the Bond franchise in a healthy state but let's face it ever since CR was trounced by Happy Feet in the opening week I don't think we're looking to America to deduce the best future direction of the series.

    Brosnan certainly was American friendly, conversely Remington Steel was a bit of a flop in the UK and no-one here was clamouring for him to be Bond, but now the series has a 'local boy' again with Craig it's no surprise that they're gradually stepping away from Bond in favour of MI and Bourne.

    It's if the next Bond film or Bond actor will have a dismal showing in the first week at the UK that will be the most damning.

    Yes.....now that would be bad.....as foreign markets would take that, that as Bond is a British cultural icon, that if the Brits didn't like Bond anymore, why should they.

    Mind you, back in the days of the mid-late 80's the Bond films were still popular in the UK, and doing good business!
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