Bond misses David Arnold

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  • imranbecksimranbecks Singapore
    Posts: 972
    Just listening to the Spectre soundtrack right now. For some reason, I prefer his work for Skyfall. I really like his Istanbul score. Nothing spectacular about the sounds of Spectre judging by the soundtrack that I'm listening to. Then again, maybe I'll change my mind after I see the movie to hear the soundtrack play out with the scenes.
  • MurdockMurdock The minus world
    Posts: 16,335
    Bond misses Good music. how about that? ;)
  • ClarkDevlinClarkDevlin Martinis, Girls and Guns
    Posts: 15,423
    Murdock wrote: »
    Bond misses Good music. how about that? ;)
    Times two. ;)
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,029
    Does anyone ever wonder why David Arnold doesn't do as many movies and seems to be mostly stuck on TV land in this decade? Was he blacklisted? Didn't please enough Hollywood big wigs? Michael Giasomething is getting away with the same stuff Arnold did on his scores, but he's currently one of the most highly demanded film composers. Strange world.
  • MurdockMurdock The minus world
    Posts: 16,335
    David Arnold doesn't have friends like J.J. Abrams and Brad Bird to get his name around like Michael Giacchino.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,029
    True, that's how hacks like Orci, Lindelof and Kurtzman get work, though it seems most of Hollywood is finally catching on that they aren't worth the trouble.
  • MurdockMurdock The minus world
    Posts: 16,335
    True, that's how hacks like Orci, Lindelof and Kurtzman get work, though it seems most of Hollywood is finally catching on that they aren't worth the trouble.

    Yeah. Outside of Bond I think Arnold's had some really good noteworthy scores. Stargate and Independence Day are very good original scores. The latter reminds me a lot of John Williams to a degree. It's sad to see him so underrated in the Industry.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,029
    They were nice from what I recall. I watched 2 FAST 2 FURIOUS not too long ago, and was amused to see Arnold did the score for that. I rarely come across movies by him because so much of what he did... doesn't look good. So as I watched Paul Walker racing, something struck me. The music. Where have I heard that before? Oh! DIE ANOTHER DAY! It sounds like his work on that Brosnan film, only he couldn't use the Bond theme. It happened during this scene.



    Other than that, I only recall him being used for HOT FUZZ and the genius behind that mostly goes to Edgar Wright, having Arnold do his usual thing only it's used to heighten comedic effect.
  • MurdockMurdock The minus world
    Posts: 16,335
    Oh wow, I had no idea Arnold did the score for Hot Fuzz. I need to watch it again. I need to give the Fast and Furious movies a chance. I could hear Arnolds 1-2-3-4 1-2-3-4 note motif towards the end.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    I didn't mind his Godzilla score. Independence Day was ok too.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,029
    Haven't seen Godzilla since I was a kid, but I actually do remember thinking the score sounded very dated, like it was something conjured up from the 50s. Was that what Arnold was going for to homage the original Japanese film? The only oversight was the lack of the Godzilla theme, no where to be found IIRC. I watched a lot of Godzilla films as a kid, so it really stuck out to me.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,029
    Murdock wrote: »
    I need to give the Fast and Furious movies a chance. I could hear Arnolds 1-2-3-4 1-2-3-4 note motif towards the end.

    He only did that second movie, as he used to be John Singleton's go to composer until that ended 10 years ago, for reasons I'm not aware of. What was the falling out Arnold had with Emmerich on Godzilla?
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    Actually I don't know much about Godzilla so can't comment on the Godzilla theme. I just know that when I saw the film on Ultra 4K blu ray recently (it looks amazing in that format by the way) I instantly recognized the scoring as Arnold......it was reminiscent of his Bond work but I would say a little better actually........his loud action scoring is actually more suited to this kind of grand disaster film than a Bond film imho.

    I also liked Puffy's (or is that P Diddy's) bastardization of Zep's greatness Kashmir from the same film:
  • MurdockMurdock The minus world
    Posts: 16,335
    I only saw the film once so I don't remember anything about it or the music but just listening to the main theme for the film it reminds me of Elliot Goldenthal's music for Batman Forever and Batman and Robin. Which was probably the only thing I enjoyed from those films. The use of Snare drums is also similar to how Barry used snares in Octopussy and The Living Daylights.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,029
    And Jimmy Page contributed to that, as if to give the finger to Plant.

    Anyway, this made me laugh hard from 2 FAST 2 FURIOUS. It's so... wow.

  • MurdockMurdock The minus world
    Posts: 16,335
    Haha nice intro. I wonder what kind of Bond score Jimmy Page could come up with. I really liked his music for Death Wish 2 and 3.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,029
    Closest we'll get to that is John Barry having someone doing air guitar on AVTAK.
  • MurdockMurdock The minus world
    Posts: 16,335
    Closest we'll get to that is John Barry having someone doing air guitar on AVTAK.
    True, AVTAK is my favorite Barry Bond score. I love those screaming guitars. I'm surprised those didn't come back in TLD.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,029
    I think Barry by that point was really trying to find something new to grasp on Bond because he had done so many by the 80s. Also, because TLD brought in a new Bond, he tried to bring a new sound for that much like he did for Lazenby in OHMSS.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    I think Barry by that point was really trying to find something new to grasp on Bond because he had done so many by the 80s. Also, because TLD brought in a new Bond, he tried to bring a new sound for that much like he did for Lazenby in OHMSS.

    Arguably he tried something new for Rog in TMWTGG as well, but it wasn't quite so successful, so he went back to his classic style in MR.
  • MurdockMurdock The minus world
    Posts: 16,335
    I think Barry by that point was really trying to find something new to grasp on Bond because he had done so many by the 80s. Also, because TLD brought in a new Bond, he tried to bring a new sound for that much like he did for Lazenby in OHMSS.

    Agreed.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,029
    bondjames wrote: »
    I think Barry by that point was really trying to find something new to grasp on Bond because he had done so many by the 80s. Also, because TLD brought in a new Bond, he tried to bring a new sound for that much like he did for Lazenby in OHMSS.

    Arguably he tried something new for Rog in TMWTGG as well, but it wasn't quite so successful, so he went back to his classic style in MR.

    I don't think he necessarily went back to anything in MR. It was just further down where TMWTGG had started, only without all the jazzy touches that were a big part of the Connery films. Notice that with his first Moore score, he completely got rid of the guitar in the Bond theme and would never use it again in further scores, as if reflecting Moore's lighthearted approach. MR then went towards a sound he was generally doing on his non-Bond scores by that point with a strong emphasis on sweeping strings. In 1995 when he did new recordings of all the Bond music for his compilation Moviola II, it was all done in the kind of style he had become accustomed to by the 90s rather than a reprise of his old 60s sound.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    bondjames wrote: »
    I think Barry by that point was really trying to find something new to grasp on Bond because he had done so many by the 80s. Also, because TLD brought in a new Bond, he tried to bring a new sound for that much like he did for Lazenby in OHMSS.

    Arguably he tried something new for Rog in TMWTGG as well, but it wasn't quite so successful, so he went back to his classic style in MR.

    I don't think he necessarily went back to anything in MR. It was just further down where TMWTGG had started, only without all the jazzy touches that were a big part of the Connery films. Notice that with his first Moore score, he completely got rid of the guitar in the Bond theme and would never use it again in further scores, as if reflecting Moore's lighthearted approach. MR then went towards a sound he was generally doing on his non-Bond scores by that point with a strong emphasis on sweeping strings. In 1995 when he did new recordings of all the Bond music for his compilation Moviola II, it was all done in the kind of style he had become accustomed to by the 90s rather than a reprise of his old 60s sound.

    Fair point. Barry in the 60's was quite different from the latter era. There was far more string use later on.
  • MurdockMurdock The minus world
    edited October 2015 Posts: 16,335
    Yes. TMWTGG was the turning point in Barry's style. He shifted from the more Jazzy, twangy guitar Bond sound to a bigger, orchestral Bond sound and that style kept with Barry until he retired. Though by the 90's I think he was running out of steam.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,029
    Barry arguably peaked with DANCES WITH WOLVES and since then went through the motions. He still delivered good work, but he no longer seemed interested in topping himself.
  • Posts: 501
    I like David Arnold in general. The problem is that when he does Bond he's obsessed with trying to imitate Barry. And he shouldn't do that. Arnold is a fine composer, but I don't want him in Bond. His Barry impersonations just aren't enough.

    I haven't listened to SPECTRE, since I'm waiting to watch the film the 6th of November, but I loved what Newman did with Skyfall. I just loved it. I believe Newman to be one of the top composers nowadays. His style is unique and special. I never imagined that special style would match the bondian canon, but surprisingly it did. Or at least, it did for me.

    However, as I said in another thread, if there had to be a change of composers, I'd love to have Giacchino, Iglesias or Murray Gold.
  • MurdockMurdock The minus world
    Posts: 16,335
    Barry arguably peaked with DANCES WITH WOLVES and since then went through the motions. He still delivered good work, but he no longer seemed interested in topping himself.
    Which I think is why he recommended David Arnold, and refused to do the score for "The Incredibles." But I think Michael Giacchino did a great job emulating 60's Barry.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited October 2015 Posts: 23,883
    Murdock wrote: »
    Yes. TMWTGG was the turning point in Barry's style. He shifted from the more Jazzy, twangy guitar Bond sound to a bigger, orchestral Bond sound and that style kept with Barry until he retire. Though by the 90's I think he was running out of steam.

    I loved the Specialist score:


    Enigma is fantastic too:
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,029
    Murdock wrote: »
    Barry arguably peaked with DANCES WITH WOLVES and since then went through the motions. He still delivered good work, but he no longer seemed interested in topping himself.
    Which I think is why he recommended David Arnold, and refused to do the score for "The Incredibles." But I think Michael Giacchino did a great job emulating 60's Barry.

    Pretty much. Interestingly, it was Barry who recommended Eric Serra to EON as he was already committed to working THE SCARLET LETTER and couldn't make time for GOLDENEYE. When approached again for TND he gave Arnold the recommendation as he was working on the "Shaken and Stirred".
  • MurdockMurdock The minus world
    Posts: 16,335
    Murdock wrote: »
    Barry arguably peaked with DANCES WITH WOLVES and since then went through the motions. He still delivered good work, but he no longer seemed interested in topping himself.
    Which I think is why he recommended David Arnold, and refused to do the score for "The Incredibles." But I think Michael Giacchino did a great job emulating 60's Barry.

    Pretty much. Interestingly, it was Barry who recommended Eric Serra to EON as he was already committed to working THE SCARLET LETTER and couldn't make time for GOLDENEYE. When approached again for TND he gave Arnold the recommendation as he was working on the "Shaken and Stirred".

    That is interesting. I didn't know Barry also recommended Serra.
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