Most Underrated Film

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  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 39,799
    @0BradyM0Bondfanatic7:
    I didn't realize a lot of symbolism played into the ending. Forgive me, I've only seen the film once and it was when it was in theaters, hence my confusion.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 Quantum Floral Arrangements: "We Have Petals Everywhere"
    Posts: 28,694
    Creasy47 wrote:
    @0BradyM0Bondfanatic7:
    I didn't realize a lot of symbolism played into the ending. Forgive me, I've only seen the film once and it was when it was in theaters, hence my confusion.

    That's fine. I am not trying to sound like a know it all or anything, but
    that is just how I see the ending. The director seems the type to drop hints like that. But again, he could be dead, he could be alive. How you take the ending is all up to you. :)
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    edited July 2013 Posts: 39,799
    @0BradyM0Bondfanatic7, no, I totally understand. I usually have an opinion after a film that I'll keep for months or years on end whether I've rewatched it or not, and in time, tiny details such as that disappear from my memory and kind of warp how I should be thinking or change details that make an idea or scene something totally different. Either way, it really is a fantastic slow-burner of a movie.

    Speaking of underrated films, I feel like quite a few foreign films I've watched are ridiculously entertaining yet haven't been seen by many, such as 'I Saw The Devil' or some of Mads Mikkelsen's foreign work like 'Flame & Citron' and 'After the Wedding.' He has a new movie coming out at the end of the month (in the area, anyway) called 'The Hunt' which looks incredible, and I think my girlfriend is going to join me in seeing it.
  • Posts: 66
    I loved the American. It's certainly not for the average movie goer, but it is a kind of film that harks back to the dramas/thrillers of the 1950's and how movies used to be; I.E. solely charater based. For me another overlooked/underrated film is "The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes". I've always enjoyed that particular Holmes movie, and I'm critical when it comes to Sherlock Holmes adaptations as he is my second favorite literary charater next to James Bond. Also, I believe another overlooked classic is the original Japanese Godzilla film. It is often disregarded as a monster movie, but it works really well as a metaphor for you nuclear power and man's responsibility when it comes to the awesome power of science.
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded the Ballrooms of Mars
    edited July 2013 Posts: 12,459
    Creasy47 wrote:
    @0BradyM0Bondfanatic7:
    I didn't realize a lot of symbolism played into the ending. Forgive me, I've only seen the film once and it was when it was in theaters, hence my confusion.

    That's fine. I am not trying to sound like a know it all or anything, but
    that is just how I see the ending. The director seems the type to drop hints like that. But again, he could be dead, he could be alive. How you take the ending is all up to you. :)

    I am okay with the ending being ambiguous; I think it works better that way actually.

    For me,
    he lives, barely, but lives. I like the film so much I made up my own ending: Clara calls the priest from her cell phone (in her bag), stops the bleeding with her shawl, the priest arrives with a doctor friend and they spirit Jack/Edward away to a secret place. Just barely alive but yeah, that's the way I see it. And to preserve the illusion that he has died (thereby giving him a chance to not be hunted down by more Swedes or anyone else) the priest has a fake funeral for him. Anyway, that just suits my nature so that is my ending. If the director wanted him flat out killed and dead and buried he would have done so, and I like that he left it up to us. So you can go either way with it. I loved the "Goodbye, Mr Butterfly" line - it was perfect and perfectly delivered. After all, she was plotting to kill him no matter how much she liked him (and I think she did). She was professional and it was her job. Fortunately, Jack's gut instincts proved correct in time.
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded the Ballrooms of Mars
    Posts: 12,459
    Also, I have heard great things about The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes - I will have to find a way to see it, I really want to. I think Gatiss and Moffit really found it influential, too, if I remember that correctly.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 Quantum Floral Arrangements: "We Have Petals Everywhere"
    edited July 2013 Posts: 28,694
    Creasy47 wrote:
    @0BradyM0Bondfanatic7:
    I didn't realize a lot of symbolism played into the ending. Forgive me, I've only seen the film once and it was when it was in theaters, hence my confusion.

    That's fine. I am not trying to sound like a know it all or anything, but
    that is just how I see the ending. The director seems the type to drop hints like that. But again, he could be dead, he could be alive. How you take the ending is all up to you. :)

    I am okay with the ending being ambiguous; I think it works better that way actually.

    For me,
    he lives, barely, but lives. I like the film so much I made up my own ending: Clara calls the priest from her cell phone (in her bag), stops the bleeding with her shawl, the priest arrives with a doctor friend and they spirit Jack/Edward away to a secret place. Just barely alive but yeah, that's the way I see it. And to preserve the illusion that he has died (thereby giving him a chance to not be hunted down by more Swedes or anyone else) the priest has a fake funeral for him. Anyway, that just suits my nature so that is my ending. If the director wanted him flat out killed and dead and buried he would have done so, and I like that he left it up to us. So you can go either way with it. I loved the "Goodbye, Mr Butterfly" line - it was perfect and perfectly delivered. After all, she was plotting to kill him no matter how much she liked him (and I think she did). She was professional and it was her job. Fortunately, Jack's gut instincts proved correct in time.

    Very interesting and well written, @4EverBonded! The film is also based on a novel called A Very Private Gentleman, which I hope to read one day.
    Also, I have heard great things about The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes - I will have to find a way to see it, I really want to. I think Gatiss and Moffit really found it influential, too, if I remember that correctly.
    I haven't seen it yet either, but I do share your enthusiasm to, naturally. :)
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded the Ballrooms of Mars
    Posts: 12,459
    Re: The American - I heard it was from the book, but then I read it was only loosely based on it. Still, I want to read it. So it goes on my list to get.
  • Posts: 1,817
    Kingdom of Heaven
    220px-KoHposter.jpg

    It didn't get the appraisal of Gladiator but in my opinion is almost as good. What most impresses me is the historical accuracy, even in little details. The only downside is of course Orlando Bloom. He is not terrible but I believe a better actor would improve not only the movie but also its reception.
  • edited July 2013 Posts: 4,622
    This movie is underrated. One of my favourites. There should have been 10 sequels by now!
    Starring Fred Ward as Remo and Joel Gray as Chiun. Directed by Guy Hamilton. Screenplay by Christopher Wood, adapted from the Warren Murphy, Richard Sapir, Destroyer novels.

    REMO-WILLIAMS-THE-ADVENTURE-BEGINS.jpg
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded the Ballrooms of Mars
    Posts: 12,459
    I can't believe I've never seen it. I have always liked Fred Ward, and I read a couple of Remo novels decades ago.
  • edited July 2013 Posts: 4,622
    I can't believe I've never seen it. I have always liked Fred Ward, and I read a couple of Remo novels decades ago.

    What, :-O you read a couple of Destroyer novels and didn't feel compelled to read them all?! ;)
    The complete 145 volume collection, plus companion books, takes up 5 shelves on my bookshelf.

    I love Bond, but he's no match for a Master of Sinanju! Move over indeed, Mr. Bond! :D
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded the Ballrooms of Mars
    Posts: 12,459
    Yes, I don't know what happened! It was decades ago.
    I will check them out again later this year. Which of the entire series do you consider to be the best? (although we may need to do this in a PM, as this is a film thread ...)
  • edited July 2013 Posts: 4,622
    I personally recommend any of books 59-70. Those are my favourites, which were all published in and around the time of the film release, 1985. They cranked out a new title every 3 months back then. I started with this bunch of books and then went back to the beginning. The '80s was prime Destroyer time. Post book #71 though, the quality dipped a bit, with the original authors handing things off to their handpicked ghost. Jim Mullaney would very much revive the series later though. He was handpicked ghost #2 and a darn good one, but you are right, I can pm you with some choice titles.

    But again, Remo Williams is a terribly underrated film, IMHO of course. I loved it so much, I searched out the books and got hooked.
    However, I have to admit it was Bond that brought me to Remo.
    I couldn't ignore that Guy Hamilton, my favourite Bond director, was directing and that Chris Wood was writing. The film marketing did seem to try to capitalize on the escapist/adventure Bond vibe as well.
    It was a no brainer that I would be shelling out cinema coin for this film.
    And I am glad I did.

    Fred Ward as Remo in action, dealing with very evil henchman.
    600full-remo-williams%3A-the-adventure-begins-screenshot.jpg
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,628
    The movie rocked, no doubt!
  • MurdockMurdock The minus world
    Posts: 16,282
    Death Wish III
    The movie gets a bad rap for being too violent. It's probably one of the most fun action movies I've seen in years.
  • Posts: 4,622
    For sure, re. Death Wish III. Bronson did a nice job anchoring these films.
  • Posts: 1,404
    For me, the 1998 version of Godzilla with Jean Reno wins hands down.
    Action-packed movie featuring my favorite french actor Jean Reno.

    I never was able to figure out why the 1998 Godzilla got so much bad reviews.
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,628
    I never was able to figure out why the 1998 Godzilla got so much bad reviews.
    Because it wasn't Godzilla.
    Take that name off the film, and it's a good MONSTER movie.
  • Posts: 2,400
    Just thought of this, but aren't Bond films in general underrated in a way? I mean, you never really see them on "best films of all time" lists.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 39,799
    @StirredNotShaken, I feel that some are. I actually had a friend tell me that it was laughable because I love James Bond and have seen all of the films a tremendous amount of times, yet I should 'stick with my generation and watch Harry Potter and Twilight more.'

    What a joke.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 Quantum Floral Arrangements: "We Have Petals Everywhere"
    Posts: 28,694
    Just thought of this, but aren't Bond films in general underrated in a way? I mean, you never really see them on "best films of all time" lists.

    Most definitely!
  • Posts: 2,400
    I mean, it obviously doesn't apply to every single one of them. But Casino Royale, for example is definitely, without question, one of the greatest movies ever made, with or without the "Bond film" tag. It's just a masterfully put together piece of cinema. I could make similar arguments for OHMSS, TLD, FRWL, and maybe even GoldenEye (despite Brosnan). It's funny, because Bond movies are hotly and frequently discussed, yet again, they never seem to make any of these "best of" lists.
  • Posts: 1,614
    Police Academy sequels
    NOES , esp NOES 2
    Jaws 2
    Eaten Alive
    Biloxi Blues
    Communion
    Comfort of strangers
    TMNT II
    TMNT animated movie
    Red Heat
    Batman : Sub Zero
    Halloween III (fans were just bummed no Myers/Loomis)
    Fist of Fury II and III
    Ninja Strikes Back (this is like MR where it's all about the spectacle)
    Gigli (actually has some funny scenes)
    The Cell
    Angel Eyes
    For Petes Sake
  • AgentCalibosAgentCalibos Banned
    Posts: 46
    The Maniac Cop films, man they could have made a huge franchise with this guy but the third film ended up being a complete dud.

  • talos7talos7 New Orleans
    Posts: 7,459
    Rogue. Yes it's about a massive crocodile but it's beautifully made. The cinematography is incredible; The music is haunting; it has a strong cast. Rogue was filmed in Australia and looks stunning.
  • Posts: 6,396
    I'm a big fan of 70's conspiracy thrillers. Capricorn One is a very good example. Love that film
  • talos7talos7 New Orleans
    Posts: 7,459
    I'm a big fan of 70's conspiracy thrillers. Capricorn One is a very good example. Love that film
    This is a really good, fun, movie.

  • edited August 2013 Posts: 19
    My kids loved Cars 2... syched for Planes
  • edited March 2014 Posts: 1,614


    I'd say PA2-6 (fyi , PA1 is 30 today.......)

    Capt Harris : "Move it , move it , move it !!!!"
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