NO TIME TO DIE (2021) - Critical Reaction and Box Office Performance

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Comments

  • Posts: 3,316
    Ryan wrote: »
    bondsum wrote: »
    Ryan wrote: »
    No need to patronize. I was referring to the doom and gloom of some users. Underwhelming? Certainly. But far too early to get hung up on a singular notion when the film is - so far - undoubtedly a success for EON worldwide. And like you said, it's not over yet.

    Personally, I'm just not someone who gets too hung up on numbers as they don't affect my view on a film or not, but I'm not stupid. Yes, films are made to make money. However, EON has clearly been making the films they want to make over the Craig years and I highly doubt a slightly underwhelming opening weekend is going to cause some serious change of course for the series going forward. I could be wrong, but again, far too early to tell.

    Die Another Day was far from a box office failure as far as Bond at the box office was concerned in 2002, and yet they changed direction anyways. Seemed to be a decision fueled by creativity, with a gamble on a new Bond, and the bonus was that it ended up paying off.
    Sorry if you felt I was patronizing you, but I did take your critical accolades remark as rather patronizing in itself and somewhat of a cop out. I also understand that some here don't get hung-up on box office numbers and won't allow them to affect their overall enjoyment of a movie. It's good that you have shown that you do understand why movies are made, and that they're not just made for award season and column inches. Personally, I believe everyone is entitled to post as many negative and positives comments as they like because its now fair game. That said, the numbers are important and they do have a major impact on where Bond goes in future, like it or not.

    I never said anything about making it just for the accolade, but rather that they still got rave reviews by making the story they wanted to tell. I don't see how that is patronizing or a cop out as it was not intended to be an excuse, but rather, an outlook. As much as SPECTRE was a mixed bag among fans and less impressive than its predecessor at the box office it would seem that EON were not deterred at all from finishing that story. While they obviously want the film to make money, they didn't necessarily make the most obvious film to do so by going in this direction. At the very least, that's how I see it - truth or not.

    Further to that- as if I don't know that people can share their positive or negative opinions as much as they want to. It only seemed to be trouble when I shared mine. I simply offered my own two cents which I stand by and you even agreed with - it's too early to really make the final call.

    But to insinuate that I must just "not understand" even though you yourself said we're all entitled to post what we want? That might be different had I pretended to be an expert on box office, but I didn't. I think at this point we run the risk of arguing over semantics when we didn't in fact entirely disagree with one another.
    Okay, we're done talking @Ryan. Have a good day wherever you are.
  • 00Heaven00Heaven Home
    Posts: 507
    On subject of BO... Is the last day they're going to be showing this in the UK (at least at the Odeon) really going to be 20th October? Is that short or long or par for the course? I've no idea. I just noticed that you just can't book past that date.
  • RyanRyan Canada
    Posts: 636
    bondsum wrote: »
    Ryan wrote: »
    bondsum wrote: »
    Ryan wrote: »
    No need to patronize. I was referring to the doom and gloom of some users. Underwhelming? Certainly. But far too early to get hung up on a singular notion when the film is - so far - undoubtedly a success for EON worldwide. And like you said, it's not over yet.

    Personally, I'm just not someone who gets too hung up on numbers as they don't affect my view on a film or not, but I'm not stupid. Yes, films are made to make money. However, EON has clearly been making the films they want to make over the Craig years and I highly doubt a slightly underwhelming opening weekend is going to cause some serious change of course for the series going forward. I could be wrong, but again, far too early to tell.

    Die Another Day was far from a box office failure as far as Bond at the box office was concerned in 2002, and yet they changed direction anyways. Seemed to be a decision fueled by creativity, with a gamble on a new Bond, and the bonus was that it ended up paying off.
    Sorry if you felt I was patronizing you, but I did take your critical accolades remark as rather patronizing in itself and somewhat of a cop out. I also understand that some here don't get hung-up on box office numbers and won't allow them to affect their overall enjoyment of a movie. It's good that you have shown that you do understand why movies are made, and that they're not just made for award season and column inches. Personally, I believe everyone is entitled to post as many negative and positives comments as they like because its now fair game. That said, the numbers are important and they do have a major impact on where Bond goes in future, like it or not.

    I never said anything about making it just for the accolade, but rather that they still got rave reviews by making the story they wanted to tell. I don't see how that is patronizing or a cop out as it was not intended to be an excuse, but rather, an outlook. As much as SPECTRE was a mixed bag among fans and less impressive than its predecessor at the box office it would seem that EON were not deterred at all from finishing that story. While they obviously want the film to make money, they didn't necessarily make the most obvious film to do so by going in this direction. At the very least, that's how I see it - truth or not.

    Further to that- as if I don't know that people can share their positive or negative opinions as much as they want to. It only seemed to be trouble when I shared mine. I simply offered my own two cents which I stand by and you even agreed with - it's too early to really make the final call.

    But to insinuate that I must just "not understand" even though you yourself said we're all entitled to post what we want? That might be different had I pretended to be an expert on box office, but I didn't. I think at this point we run the risk of arguing over semantics when we didn't in fact entirely disagree with one another.
    Okay, we're done talking @Ryan. Have a good day wherever you are.

    Seems I struck a nerve.
  • Posts: 625
    bondsum wrote: »
    It would appear that in North America the Bond audience is skewed quite heavily toward an older demographic.

    I don't get why "young Americans" don't het Bond?

    I've been to several screenings in Germany and England. And you had groups of teen and twen girls in there. So in Europe NTTD is a "girls night out"-movie aswell as a men's movie.
    I know even 20-year-old women who think that Craig is hot.
    Maybe it's a Europe vs. America-thing: But I have the feeling, that it's not cool in the US for young people to root for an "old white" movie star. Can that be?
  • 9IW9IW
    Posts: 59
    Ryan wrote: »
    bondsum wrote: »
    Ryan wrote: »
    No need to patronize. I was referring to the doom and gloom of some users. Underwhelming? Certainly. But far too early to get hung up on a singular notion when the film is - so far - undoubtedly a success for EON worldwide. And like you said, it's not over yet.

    Personally, I'm just not someone who gets too hung up on numbers as they don't affect my view on a film or not, but I'm not stupid. Yes, films are made to make money. However, EON has clearly been making the films they want to make over the Craig years and I highly doubt a slightly underwhelming opening weekend is going to cause some serious change of course for the series going forward. I could be wrong, but again, far too early to tell.

    Die Another Day was far from a box office failure as far as Bond at the box office was concerned in 2002, and yet they changed direction anyways. Seemed to be a decision fueled by creativity, with a gamble on a new Bond, and the bonus was that it ended up paying off.
    Sorry if you felt I was patronizing you, but I did take your critical accolades remark as rather patronizing in itself and somewhat of a cop out. I also understand that some here don't get hung-up on box office numbers and won't allow them to affect their overall enjoyment of a movie. It's good that you have shown that you do understand why movies are made, and that they're not just made for award season and column inches. Personally, I believe everyone is entitled to post as many negative and positives comments as they like because its now fair game. That said, the numbers are important and they do have a major impact on where Bond goes in future, like it or not.

    I never said anything about making it just for the accolade, but rather that they still got rave reviews by making the story they wanted to tell. I don't see how that is patronizing or a cop out as it was not intended to be an excuse, but rather, an outlook. As much as SPECTRE was a mixed bag among fans and less impressive than its predecessor at the box office it would seem that EON were not deterred at all from finishing that story. While they obviously want the film to make money, they didn't necessarily make the most obvious film to do so by going in this direction. At the very least, that's how I see it - truth or not.

    Further to that- as if I don't know that people can share their positive or negative opinions as much as they want to. It only seemed to be trouble when I shared mine. I simply offered my own two cents which I stand by and you even agreed with - it's too early to really make the final call.

    But to insinuate that I must just "not understand" even though you yourself said we're all entitled to post what we want? That might be different had I pretended to be an expert on box office, but I didn't. I think at this point we run the risk of arguing over semantics when we didn't in fact entirely disagree with one another.

    Your subsequent posts explained your position, but the first one struck me as naive initially, not patronizing. I see where you are coming from now and the points are well taken.

    I have no doubt that EON is concerned about the domestic numbers, but know that pandemic-era film economics require some patience.
  • DrinmanDrinman New York
    Posts: 40
    Jan1985 wrote: »
    bondsum wrote: »
    It would appear that in North America the Bond audience is skewed quite heavily toward an older demographic.

    I don't get why "young Americans" don't het Bond?

    I've been to several screenings in Germany and England. And you had groups of teen and twen girls in there. So in Europe NTTD is a "girls night out"-movie aswell as a men's movie.
    I know even 20-year-old women who think that Craig is hot.
    Maybe it's a Europe vs. America-thing: But I have the feeling, that it's not cool in the US for young people to root for an "old white" movie star. Can that be?

    American here. I’ve always been the biggest Bond fan out of my friend group and family. Most people here are very familiar with the brand and can name a few movies but it’s just not considered the same type of can’t miss experience like most Marvel films are these days for most people 35 and below.

    I remember growing up in the late 90’s/early 2000’s and there always being a new Bond video game available as well which kept my interest in Bond going strong between movies which is non existent for potential young fans now.
  • RyanRyan Canada
    Posts: 636
    9IW wrote: »
    Ryan wrote: »
    bondsum wrote: »
    Ryan wrote: »
    No need to patronize. I was referring to the doom and gloom of some users. Underwhelming? Certainly. But far too early to get hung up on a singular notion when the film is - so far - undoubtedly a success for EON worldwide. And like you said, it's not over yet.

    Personally, I'm just not someone who gets too hung up on numbers as they don't affect my view on a film or not, but I'm not stupid. Yes, films are made to make money. However, EON has clearly been making the films they want to make over the Craig years and I highly doubt a slightly underwhelming opening weekend is going to cause some serious change of course for the series going forward. I could be wrong, but again, far too early to tell.

    Die Another Day was far from a box office failure as far as Bond at the box office was concerned in 2002, and yet they changed direction anyways. Seemed to be a decision fueled by creativity, with a gamble on a new Bond, and the bonus was that it ended up paying off.
    Sorry if you felt I was patronizing you, but I did take your critical accolades remark as rather patronizing in itself and somewhat of a cop out. I also understand that some here don't get hung-up on box office numbers and won't allow them to affect their overall enjoyment of a movie. It's good that you have shown that you do understand why movies are made, and that they're not just made for award season and column inches. Personally, I believe everyone is entitled to post as many negative and positives comments as they like because its now fair game. That said, the numbers are important and they do have a major impact on where Bond goes in future, like it or not.

    I never said anything about making it just for the accolade, but rather that they still got rave reviews by making the story they wanted to tell. I don't see how that is patronizing or a cop out as it was not intended to be an excuse, but rather, an outlook. As much as SPECTRE was a mixed bag among fans and less impressive than its predecessor at the box office it would seem that EON were not deterred at all from finishing that story. While they obviously want the film to make money, they didn't necessarily make the most obvious film to do so by going in this direction. At the very least, that's how I see it - truth or not.

    Further to that- as if I don't know that people can share their positive or negative opinions as much as they want to. It only seemed to be trouble when I shared mine. I simply offered my own two cents which I stand by and you even agreed with - it's too early to really make the final call.

    But to insinuate that I must just "not understand" even though you yourself said we're all entitled to post what we want? That might be different had I pretended to be an expert on box office, but I didn't. I think at this point we run the risk of arguing over semantics when we didn't in fact entirely disagree with one another.

    Your subsequent posts explained your position, but the first one struck me as naive initially, not patronizing. I see where you are coming from now and the points are well taken.

    I have no doubt that EON is concerned about the domestic numbers, but know that pandemic-era film economics require some patience.

    I appreciate that. I'm certainly not trying to undermine anybody who is more knowledgeable on the topic of box office, but perhaps I initially failed to make my general point/suggestion clear.
  • MalloryMallory Do mosquitoes have friends?
    Posts: 1,655
    00Heaven wrote: »
    On subject of BO... Is the last day they're going to be showing this in the UK (at least at the Odeon) really going to be 20th October? Is that short or long or par for the course? I've no idea. I just noticed that you just can't book past that date.

    Cinemas only work one week in advance, unless it is for special pre-bookings. Odeon will be showing NTTD well into November and December.
  • 9IW9IW
    Posts: 59
    Drinman wrote: »
    Jan1985 wrote: »
    bondsum wrote: »
    It would appear that in North America the Bond audience is skewed quite heavily toward an older demographic.

    I don't get why "young Americans" don't het Bond?

    I've been to several screenings in Germany and England. And you had groups of teen and twen girls in there. So in Europe NTTD is a "girls night out"-movie aswell as a men's movie.
    I know even 20-year-old women who think that Craig is hot.
    Maybe it's a Europe vs. America-thing: But I have the feeling, that it's not cool in the US for young people to root for an "old white" movie star. Can that be?

    American here. I’ve always been the biggest Bond fan out of my friend group and family. Most people here are very familiar with the brand and can name a few movies but it’s just not considered the same type of can’t miss experience like most Marvel films are these days for most people 35 and below.

    I remember growing up in the late 90’s/early 2000’s and there always being a new Bond video game available as well which kept my interest in Bond going strong between movies which is non existent for potential young fans now.

    Same here. Not a single person in my circle of acquaintance expressed any excitement about the film opening and none went to see it. But when Star Wars, Batman or Avengers is about to premiere …my phone blows up all week. And they know I will go with them but am not a huge fan. Bond doesnt generate a fraction of that excitement around here.
  • RyanRyan Canada
    Posts: 636
    9IW wrote: »
    Drinman wrote: »
    Jan1985 wrote: »
    bondsum wrote: »
    It would appear that in North America the Bond audience is skewed quite heavily toward an older demographic.

    I don't get why "young Americans" don't het Bond?

    I've been to several screenings in Germany and England. And you had groups of teen and twen girls in there. So in Europe NTTD is a "girls night out"-movie aswell as a men's movie.
    I know even 20-year-old women who think that Craig is hot.
    Maybe it's a Europe vs. America-thing: But I have the feeling, that it's not cool in the US for young people to root for an "old white" movie star. Can that be?

    American here. I’ve always been the biggest Bond fan out of my friend group and family. Most people here are very familiar with the brand and can name a few movies but it’s just not considered the same type of can’t miss experience like most Marvel films are these days for most people 35 and below.

    I remember growing up in the late 90’s/early 2000’s and there always being a new Bond video game available as well which kept my interest in Bond going strong between movies which is non existent for potential young fans now.

    Same here. Not a single person in my circle of acquaintance expressed any excitement about the film opening and none went to see it. But when Star Wars, Batman or Avengers is about to premiere …my phone blows up all week. And they know I will go with them but am not a huge fan. Bond doesnt generate a fraction of that excitement around here.

    I can definitely relate to this. Only one of my close friends is a big Bond fan, but the rest are always talking excitedly about the plethora of Marvel shows and films coming along and show little enthusiasm for Bond. They'll always join me at the cinema and usually enjoy the film, but the interest just isn't there overall.
  • DrinmanDrinman New York
    edited October 2021 Posts: 40
    Overall Bond is not as popular in the US as some other brands but one thing it always has going for it is CONSISTENCY. You knew with a few exceptions that a Bond movie would always be there every 2 or maybe 3 years which kept the interest in the franchise ongoing. In between you had other media (games, books, etc…) as well.

    When you start getting to 4 and 5 years gaps as the new norm (for the sake of “quality”) with nothing in between to stoke interest you are not doing your brand any favors.

    Think back to your childhoods. 5 years felt like an entire lifetime. I remember thinking as a young kid “OMG how did they go 6 years without a Bond film between LTK and GE”. To the young mind that large gap is enough time to become a fanboy of something else and never develop the interest many of us did in Bond during our youth.

  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 36,603
    Anyone have an idea how long this might stay in theaters in the U.S.? I’m not sure how much it’s changed since we’re still in a pandemic. I was going to go again today but can’t now, might wait two weeks when I have a better opportunity, but I don’t want to wait and then it’s already gone somehow.
  • 9IW9IW
    Posts: 59
    Drinman wrote: »
    Overall Bond is not as popular in the US as some other brands but one thing it always has going for it is CONSISTENCY. You knew with a few exceptions that a Bond movie would always be there every 2 or maybe 3 years which kept the interest in the franchise ongoing. In between you had other media (games, books, etc…) as well.

    When you start getting to 4 and 5 years gaps as the new norm (for the sake of “quality”) with nothing in between to stoke interest you are not doing your brand any favors.

    Think back to your childhoods. 5 years felt like an entire lifetime. I remember thinking as a young kid “OMG how did they go 6 years without a Bond film between LTK and GE”. To the young mind that large gap is enough time to become a fanboy of something else and never develop the interest many of us did in Bond during our youth.

    Agree. I grew up with the Roger Moore Bond and was fed a steady dose. My interest faded a bit during the Brosnan years and it was Casino Royale that rekindled it. But my kids did not develop an affinity to Bond due to the long stretches between films while they were being fed a steady dose of Harry Potter, Star Wars and Marvel, which they are huge fans of. More damaging to Bond, my kids love Jason Bourne and rewatch that whole series at least once a year.
  • manovermanover uk
    Posts: 169
    Does anyone know how movies generally do BO wise on columbas day?
  • RyanRyan Canada
    Posts: 636
    Creasy47 wrote: »
    Anyone have an idea how long this might stay in theaters in the U.S.? I’m not sure how much it’s changed since we’re still in a pandemic. I was going to go again today but can’t now, might wait two weeks when I have a better opportunity, but I don’t want to wait and then it’s already gone somehow.

    Not that I can speak for all states or provinces, but at the very least my local theatre had Fast 9 playing as late as the Blu-ray release. I suppose those were slightly different circumstances with the simultaneous VOD release and less wide releases overall at that time, but I'm still hoping that means Bond is around for a couple months yet. I plan to see it at least once more but want to space it out a little bit.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 36,603
    Ryan wrote: »
    Creasy47 wrote: »
    Anyone have an idea how long this might stay in theaters in the U.S.? I’m not sure how much it’s changed since we’re still in a pandemic. I was going to go again today but can’t now, might wait two weeks when I have a better opportunity, but I don’t want to wait and then it’s already gone somehow.

    Not that I can speak for all states or provinces, but at the very least my local theatre had Fast 9 playing as late as the Blu-ray release. I suppose those were slightly different circumstances with the simultaneous VOD release and less wide releases overall at that time, but I'm still hoping that means Bond is around for a couple months yet. I plan to see it at least once more but want to space it out a little bit.

    Good idea, that’s part of my reasoning too: I saw it only four days back, I’d rather give it a couple weeks before seeing it once more.
  • edited October 2021 Posts: 680
    Jan1985 wrote: »
    bondsum wrote: »
    It would appear that in North America the Bond audience is skewed quite heavily toward an older demographic.

    I don't get why "young Americans" don't het Bond?

    I've been to several screenings in Germany and England. And you had groups of teen and twen girls in there. So in Europe NTTD is a "girls night out"-movie aswell as a men's movie.
    I know even 20-year-old women who think that Craig is hot.
    Maybe it's a Europe vs. America-thing: But I have the feeling, that it's not cool in the US for young people to root for an "old white" movie star. Can that be?

    It’s because it’s not on streaming. Young Americans don’t like theatres that much.
  • RainyRainy Skyfall
    edited October 2021 Posts: 40
    The video games do play a small part I think. If the IO interactive game is a hit, you can bet more young American movie-goers will have their eyes on the next film. Might be small but would help.

    Anecdotally, Goldeneye on the N64 definitely left a lasting mark on my generation (late 20s).
  • I just don't think certain markets understand that Bond is not just about action scenes and humour. Romantic elements and making Bond human ie the Daniel Craig era are just as important factors in my opinion. Die Another Day was a commercial smash but creatively one of the low points in the series.
  • edited October 2021 Posts: 680
    Craig’s bond has been around for 15 years mate. People get it. Most of Generation Zed were 3-5 years old when he was cast. He’s the only Bond they’ve ever known.
  • I see no shame in Bond not being as relatively successful with young American audiences as much as other franchises. Obviously, Bond is not an American character and the films rarely take place in the States. He is a secret agent of a foreign country (albeit an ally). The rest of the cast is also primarily British and international (although NTTD has a couple of big American actors). I'm also not sure just how much soft power British culture and Bond's style carry in the States anymore.
  • Posts: 1,314
    Another factor is that craigs films have never been aimed at young people. Not like Uncle Roger and his hi jinks. That’s a generation of film goers

    They’re way too serious and dark for the average 10 year old to enjoy. Therefore there’s been little replacement of the youth that enjoyed the films in the 90s 80s and 70s.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Each moment I draw closer to the Divine.
    Posts: 43,902
    Star Wars doesn t take place in America, either. It is still popular.
  • 9IW9IW
    Posts: 59
    My word, our kids loved Harry Potter to the tune of several billion dollars.
  • Posts: 523
    Creasy47 wrote: »
    Anyone have an idea how long this might stay in theaters in the U.S.? I’m not sure how much it’s changed since we’re still in a pandemic. I was going to go again today but can’t now, might wait two weeks when I have a better opportunity, but I don’t want to wait and then it’s already gone somehow.

    45 days is what I read
  • matt_u wrote: »
    You can see him at the SPECTRE party.

    Thanks
  • Posts: 303
    Bond generally doesn't have a spectacular opening weekend in the States, but it usually has a great holdover figure. Remember TND stayed at No.2 at the US box office for six weeks and that was against the might of Titanic. Let's wait to see what happens second week.
  • Red_SnowRed_Snow Australia
    Posts: 2,317
    ‘No Time To Die’ Now Seeing $60M+ Over 4-Day Holiday — Monday Update
    https://deadline.com/2021/10/no-time-to-die-weekend-box-office-1234852700

    No Time to Die will wind up at $60M+ over four days, thanks to the Indigenous Peoples’ Day holiday in the Northeast. A $5M-$6M Monday is in store for the Cary Joji Fukunaga-directed MGM/UAR/Eon feature which is in the space of Spectre‘s Monday ($5.3M) back in 2015, and higher than 2008’s Quantum of Solace ($4.1M) and 2006’s Casino Royale (3.8M). Daniel Craig’s turn in Skyfall saw a huge Monday of $11.3M due to the Veterans Day holiday in 2012 falling on a Sunday.
  • Red_SnowRed_Snow Australia
    Posts: 2,317
    ‘No Time to Die’ Box Office: 5 Takeaways From Daniel Craig’s Final Bond Film
    https://variety.com/2021/film/news/no-time-to-die-box-office-pandemic-analysis-daniel-craig-1235085705
  • 9IW9IW
    Posts: 59
    Red_Snow wrote: »
    ‘No Time To Die’ Now Seeing $60M+ Over 4-Day Holiday — Monday Update
    https://deadline.com/2021/10/no-time-to-die-weekend-box-office-1234852700

    No Time to Die will wind up at $60M+ over four days, thanks to the Indigenous Peoples’ Day holiday in the Northeast. A $5M-$6M Monday is in store for the Cary Joji Fukunaga-directed MGM/UAR/Eon feature which is in the space of Spectre‘s Monday ($5.3M) back in 2015, and higher than 2008’s Quantum of Solace ($4.1M) and 2006’s Casino Royale (3.8M). Daniel Craig’s turn in Skyfall saw a huge Monday of $11.3M due to the Veterans Day holiday in 2012 falling on a Sunday.
    We are celebrating the holiday here in the Southwest as well, though most still refer to it as Columbus Day. It might be worth noting that this past weekend was a huge weekend for college and professional football, particularly in the south on Saturday. It may have had a negligible box office effect, but there were millions of eyeballs glued to the TV all day Saturday, including mine.
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