Last Movie you Watched?

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  • DragonpolDragonpol The Crazy World of David Dragonpol
    Posts: 14,264
    KongSkullIslandApeocalypseNow.jpg
    Kong Skull Island better than I remember it on this watch, a decent few hours of escapism.

    Oh, I saw that one in the cinema with a friend. Shocking to think that was the last thing I saw in the cinema in fact. I always mean to go to the cinema more but I never do unless a Bond film is out or something related.
  • Posts: 14,335
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    KongSkullIslandApeocalypseNow.jpg
    Kong Skull Island better than I remember it on this watch, a decent few hours of escapism.

    Oh, I saw that one in the cinema with a friend. Shocking to think that was the last thing I saw in the cinema in fact. I always mean to go to the cinema more but I never do unless a Bond film is out or something related.

    In recent years I may go to the cinema once or twice a year, 20 years ago I went once or twice a month or more.

    Technology has pushed me to being happy to watch films at home with a good set up, though Star Trek, Star Wars and Bond I have always been cinema visits for me since I was a kid.

    I have watched every Bond film at the cinema since OP so will continue that with NTTD.

    I think the last film I watched at the cinema was The Rise of Skywalker Christmas 2019.
  • Posts: 11,679
    Brannigan, 1975. Basically John Wayne is a Chicago cop sent to England to bring back
    a famous gangster. Things go wrong and he has to become a bit of a Dirty Harry in London.
    It's an average 70s thriller and I do think John Wayne looks odd in a contemporary film, he suits being a cowboy.

    I've been on a Duke kick the past year and this is one I still haven't seen. I do love McQ, but definitely prefer John Wayne in his proper western attire. I should watch Brannigan sometime.
  • DragonpolDragonpol The Crazy World of David Dragonpol
    Posts: 14,264
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    KongSkullIslandApeocalypseNow.jpg
    Kong Skull Island better than I remember it on this watch, a decent few hours of escapism.

    Oh, I saw that one in the cinema with a friend. Shocking to think that was the last thing I saw in the cinema in fact. I always mean to go to the cinema more but I never do unless a Bond film is out or something related.

    In recent years I may go to the cinema once or twice a year, 20 years ago I went once or twice a month or more.

    Technology has pushed me to being happy to watch films at home with a good set up, though Star Trek, Star Wars and Bond I have always been cinema visits for me since I was a kid.

    I have watched every Bond film at the cinema since OP so will continue that with NTTD.

    I think the last film I watched at the cinema was The Rise of Skywalker Christmas 2019.

    Yes, well I think that's fair enough with the cinemas having been largely closed since then with the advent of the Covid-19 pandemic. I think there has been a decline in cinema attendance across the board as there are so many other options on offer such as streaming services and digital downloads.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Hamburg, near the Atlantic Hotel
    Posts: 5,965
    THE LAST SAMURAI (Edward Zwick, 2003)
    Rdf2577c355aff5fb5d01b678a33ce43e?rik=3Jm3mKzitebgYQ&riu=http%3a%2f%2fimages5.fanpop.com%2fimage%2fphotos%2f25000000%2fThe-Last-Samurai-the-last-samurai-25028596-700-465.jpg&ehk=TdcqhCT%2b1vg%2bfU6KIc48wWrwmtRwC%2fD9gstGi1gwX%2bc%3d&risl=&pid=ImgRaw


    Ok, nothing special. A bit cliche-heavy, and the score is annoying and lessens the movie.

    Funny you should say that. I seem to remember I liked the movie overall, and I even found the score pretty good...for a Hans Zimmer score, that is, which I usually find annoying, generic, repetitive and the equivalent of a granular gravy poured over a perfectly good meal. But then, my memory may be treacherous since it's been ten years or so..
  • mattjoesmattjoes matthaujoes
    Posts: 4,158
    Brief thoughts on my last four watches.

    First, a Michael Keaton double bill:

    The Paper: This was a tremendously exciting film to watch. I loved it. The highlight for me was the scene in which everyone decides to visit Keaton's office at the same time and ask him about this or that, until you can't understand what anyone is saying.

    My Life: Very touching drama. I was first drawn to it by John Barry's score. My favorite scene is when Keaton visits his family and has a conversation with his father (Michael Constantine). This moment is magnificently acted by both of them ("you never came to see me once, you never saw what kind of business I made"). As for weaknesses, I would say a couple of moments are slightly too sentimental. But apart from that, it was splendid. It felt truthful in many ways.

    Something current:

    The Father: I didn't exactly know what this was going to be like going in, and I suppose that's the best way to watch it. Anthony Hopkins brings all the shades of the character to life-- paranoia, arrogance, denial, confusion, fear. The ending is heartbreaking. From among his fellow actors, I especially liked Olivia Williams' performance in the last scene. Her immediate reaction to Anthony's cryptic words ("I'm losing all my leaves" -- what a line) shows a desire to be empathetic but makes it so clear she will never really understand what he's going through. I read Frank Langella played the lead role on the stage. I would've loved to have seen that.

    And now, for something completely different:

    The Amazonian Angel: You can find this on YouTube. It's an example of the "cinema of the body". This means, and I quote, "the filmmakers create drastic visual and auditory experiences, making films that become visceral for the viewers." This film is not really about character or plot, but about a sequence of images and sounds that are meant to place you in a trance-like state. The textures of trees, leaves, water, statues, pigments and many other objects are explored in such close detail that you almost feel you can touch them, and they're complemented by ethereal sounds, music and bits of poetry. The film is self-described as a portrait of painter Lena Vandrey, and around the halfway mark, we begin to hear brief but interesting insights about her life (Vandrey's own words, but read in the voice of one of the directors I believe). The film takes on a slightly more cerebral quality at this point, but only slightly. I'd never seen something like this before. It was co-directed by Maria Klonaris and Katerina Thomadaki, two Greek artists based in France who've done other projects in the same style.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,553
    PI (Darren Aronofsky, 1997)
    This is great. Smart, original and interesting. Looks amazing, too and has a splendid soundtrack. I checked it out on behalf of it being Aronofsky, and wasn t disappointed.
  • edited May 7 Posts: 1,404
    The Sea Hawk, 1940, starring Errol Flynn, Claude Rains, and Brenda Marshall, with Flora Robson as Queen Elizabeth. Black and white, with great music by Erich Wolfgang Korngold. Enjoyed seeing this one again, and it got me reading a bit on how England defeated the Spanish Armada, and then there was the "sequel", the English Armada, which was also unsuccessful.
  • edited May 9 Posts: 8,502
    John Wick

    Finally seeing this film and wow I really have to say it’s good. I feel like it was a bit over hyped but I did enjoy the movie and will check out the other two films.


    Coming to America
    It’s actually a charming film I love Eddie and Arseno in the film and honestly it’s far better then most fish out of water films and honestly I love the cast.

    Films I have seen in 2021
    1. Casino Royale
    2. Quantum of solace
    3. John wick
    4. Coming to America
    5. My big fat Greek wedding
    6. Batman: dying is easy
    7. Across the universe
    8. Batman hush
    9. Batman ninja
    10. Casino Royale 1954

  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,553
    DEN STØRSTE FORBRYTELSEN (Eirik Svensson, 2020)
    DSF_1920x1080_kritikker_korr3_V2.jpg


    I wanted to see this in the cinema, but never got around to it until it was too late. It s a good film about a disgraceful event.
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy N.Ireland
    Posts: 12,487
    Day of the Jackal, 1973.
    Great thriller and picked the HD version on Google movies for only £2.99
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    Posts: 3,329
    Tenet
    Certainly an impressively ambitious project from Nolan, but this didn't engage me at all. Most of the time I was clueless to what on earth was going on and as a result the action and suspense just seem flat, no matter how impressively staged they are.
    And when Robert Pattinson has more charisma than your lead, you have a problem IMO.
    Was the main character supposed to be so uninteresting?
    I enjoyed some of the ideas in the film and the music score is very impressive. But overall I was underwhelmed. Something I've never experienced with a Nolan film before.
    Think it's a film that needs another viewing, so I will definitely give it another go.

  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe Still waiting for the Jena Malone Batwoman movie that's never going to be made.Moderator
    Posts: 11,809
    Brannigan, 1975. Basically John Wayne is a Chicago cop sent to England to bring back
    a famous gangster. Things go wrong and he has to become a bit of a Dirty Harry in London.
    It's an average 70s thriller and I do think John Wayne looks odd in a contemporary film, he suits being a cowboy.

    I didn't care much for Brannigan, but The Dukes prior Dirty Harry cash-in, McQ, is pretty good. Top notch score, and an unfairly overlooked car chase are the highlights.
  • Posts: 4,625
    Not to mention the first (I guess) appearance of the Ingram submachine gun (complete with silencer ; in fact, in France, the movie was called Un Silencieux au Bout du Canon) :

    un-silencieux-au-bout-du-canon60x80.jpg
  • edited May 10 Posts: 1,404
    I liked McQ too, and that was the first time I saw Roger E. Mosley, who of course later played TC on Magnum, P.I. The same year he did McQ (1974) he also did an episode of Kojak with the former Blofeld.
  • Posts: 2,222
    Song of the South (1946)

    There's no way of defending the plantation nostalgia, complacent view of sharecropping-era conditions for African Americans, and how the racial politics barely rise above paternalism at best.

    I give it three stars because of Greg Toland's warmly beautiful cinematography (especially evident in the HD version on the Internet Archive); the voice performances of African American actors Johnny Lee and Nick Stewart; James Baskett's starring performance (not only as Uncle Remus but also, amazingly, as Brer Fox), which turns a potential stereotype into flesh and blood, the only truly human character in the film; and some of Disney's best-ever animation in terms of character acting, which means some of the finest animation from the past century.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,553
    Revelator wrote: »
    Song of the South (1946)

    There's no way of defending the plantation nostalgia, complacent view of sharecropping-era conditions for African Americans, and how the racial politics barely rise above paternalism at best.

    I give it three stars because of Greg Toland's warmly beautiful cinematography (especially evident in the HD version on the Internet Archive); the voice performances of African American actors Johnny Lee and Nick Stewart; James Baskett's starring performance (not only as Uncle Remus but also, amazingly, as Brer Fox), which turns a potential stereotype into flesh and blood, the only truly human character in the film; and some of Disney's best-ever animation in terms of character acting, which means some of the finest animation from the past century.

    It s a great film. A real disgrace that Baskett was shunned from the premiere in the south.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,553
    THE HINDENBURG (Paul Wise, 1975)

    I like airships, and have always been fascinated by the 1937 disaster. Weird I never knew about this film before. It s a good one, and Gavin O Herlihy plays a central part.
    Hindenburg_(film).png
  • DragonpolDragonpol The Crazy World of David Dragonpol
    edited May 13 Posts: 14,264
    THE HINDENBURG (Paul Wise, 1975)

    I like airships, and have always been fascinated by the 1937 disaster. Weird I never knew about this film before. It s a good one, and Gavin O Herlihy plays a central part.
    Hindenburg_(film).png

    I've heard of that film though not seen it, @Thunderfinger. I think that's the one where the explosion of the airship is shown to be a conspiracy, isn't it? Of course that theory has no relation to the facts.

    I'll tell you an interesting little personal family story about the Hindenburg. In 1937 my late father (who'd have been 13 at the time) was talking with his female next door neighbour at the stile that used to be between the two farms. All of a sudden his female neighbour gasped, "Tommy, what's that?!". It was the Hindenburg airship on its flight to the United States. My father had heard about the fact it was flying from Germany to the United States (probably on the wireless in the house) and he explained what it was and where it was going to her. It must have been a startling sight for people on the ground to witness the airship flying above a rural part of Northern Ireland with the drone of the engines and the vastness of its bulk. A check of its flight path online confirms that it did in fact fly over the far north of Northern Ireland on its way to the United States. My father told me that he remembered hearing the awful news of the disaster on May 6, 1937 on the wireless, probably the day after the disaster. He recalled how the radio journalist (called Herbert Morrison) broke down into tears when when he described the awful events he was witnessing live before him. It must have been very harrowing to listen to, especially considering my father had actually seen the airship flying over his country a while beforehand.

    Here is that harrowing radio report with accompanying footage of the disaster:



    In happier times for the Hindenburg here was The Saint author Leslie Charteris (1907-1993) talking about being a passenger on the zeppelin's maiden voyage. He speaks about his trip from Frankfurt, Germany to New Jersey, United States. The date was May 9, 1936, exactly a year to the day before the disaster occurred at the same location:

  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,553
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    THE HINDENBURG (Paul Wise, 1975)

    I like airships, and have always been fascinated by the 1937 disaster. Weird I never knew about this film before. It s a good one, and Gavin O Herlihy plays a central part.
    Hindenburg_(film).png

    I've heard of that film though not seen it, @Thunderfinger. I think that's the one where the explosion of the airship is shown to be a conspiracy, isn't it? Of course that theory has no relation to the facts.

    I'll tell you an interesting little personal family story about the Hindenburg. In 1937 my late father (who'd have been 13 at the time) was talking with his female next door neighbour at the stile that used to be between the two farms. All of a sudden his female neighbour gasped, "Tommy, what's that?!". It was the Hindenburg airship on its flight to the United States. My father had heard about the fact it was flying from Germany to the United States (probably on the wireless in the house) and he explained what it was and where it was going to her. It must have been a startling sight to people on the ground to witness the airship flying above a rural part of Northern Ireland with the drone of the engines and the vastness of its bulk. A check of its flight path online confirms that it did in fact flying over the far north of Northern Ireland on its way to the United States. My father told me that he remembered hearing the awful news of the disaster on May 6, 1937 on the wireless, probably the day after the disaster. He recalled how the radio journalist (called Herbert Morrison) broke down into tears when when he described the awful events he was witnessing live before him. It must have been very harrowing to listen to, especially considering my father had actually seen the airship flying over his country a while beforehand.

    Here is that harrowing radio report with accompanying footage of the disaster:



    In happier times for the Hindenburg here was The Saint author Leslie Charteris (1907-1993) talking about being a passenger on the zeppelin's maiden voyage. He speaks about his trip from Frankfurt, Germany to New Jersey, United States. The date was May 9, 1936, exactly a year to the day before the disaster occurred at the same location:


    Yes, that is the one, but there have been a couple other films about the same incident, and I don t know much about those. The disaster happened on May 6th, and yes I have heard that radio report before. A shame those airship flights went out of style, but here s hoping they return.
  • DragonpolDragonpol The Crazy World of David Dragonpol
    Posts: 14,264
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    THE HINDENBURG (Paul Wise, 1975)

    I like airships, and have always been fascinated by the 1937 disaster. Weird I never knew about this film before. It s a good one, and Gavin O Herlihy plays a central part.
    Hindenburg_(film).png

    I've heard of that film though not seen it, @Thunderfinger. I think that's the one where the explosion of the airship is shown to be a conspiracy, isn't it? Of course that theory has no relation to the facts.

    I'll tell you an interesting little personal family story about the Hindenburg. In 1937 my late father (who'd have been 13 at the time) was talking with his female next door neighbour at the stile that used to be between the two farms. All of a sudden his female neighbour gasped, "Tommy, what's that?!". It was the Hindenburg airship on its flight to the United States. My father had heard about the fact it was flying from Germany to the United States (probably on the wireless in the house) and he explained what it was and where it was going to her. It must have been a startling sight to people on the ground to witness the airship flying above a rural part of Northern Ireland with the drone of the engines and the vastness of its bulk. A check of its flight path online confirms that it did in fact flying over the far north of Northern Ireland on its way to the United States. My father told me that he remembered hearing the awful news of the disaster on May 6, 1937 on the wireless, probably the day after the disaster. He recalled how the radio journalist (called Herbert Morrison) broke down into tears when when he described the awful events he was witnessing live before him. It must have been very harrowing to listen to, especially considering my father had actually seen the airship flying over his country a while beforehand.

    Here is that harrowing radio report with accompanying footage of the disaster:



    In happier times for the Hindenburg here was The Saint author Leslie Charteris (1907-1993) talking about being a passenger on the zeppelin's maiden voyage. He speaks about his trip from Frankfurt, Germany to New Jersey, United States. The date was May 9, 1936, exactly a year to the day before the disaster occurred at the same location:


    Yes, that is the one, but there have been a couple other films about the same incident, and I don t know much about those. The disaster happened on May 6th, and yes I have heard that radio report before. A shame those airship flights went out of style, but here s hoping they return.

    Ah, I thought so. I'll have to see if I can catch it some time as it sounds interesting. It is a shame that mode of commercial travel came to an end but I suppose the disaster put paid to any hopes of it continuing from a public confidence point of view. I have heard that the original plan was to call the airship the Hitler (at Joseph Goebbels's suggestion) but it was decided to name it after the late German President Paul von Hindenburg instead. Imagine the propaganda and publicity fail for the regime if it had been called the Hitler!
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,553
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    THE HINDENBURG (Paul Wise, 1975)

    I like airships, and have always been fascinated by the 1937 disaster. Weird I never knew about this film before. It s a good one, and Gavin O Herlihy plays a central part.
    Hindenburg_(film).png

    I've heard of that film though not seen it, @Thunderfinger. I think that's the one where the explosion of the airship is shown to be a conspiracy, isn't it? Of course that theory has no relation to the facts.

    I'll tell you an interesting little personal family story about the Hindenburg. In 1937 my late father (who'd have been 13 at the time) was talking with his female next door neighbour at the stile that used to be between the two farms. All of a sudden his female neighbour gasped, "Tommy, what's that?!". It was the Hindenburg airship on its flight to the United States. My father had heard about the fact it was flying from Germany to the United States (probably on the wireless in the house) and he explained what it was and where it was going to her. It must have been a startling sight to people on the ground to witness the airship flying above a rural part of Northern Ireland with the drone of the engines and the vastness of its bulk. A check of its flight path online confirms that it did in fact flying over the far north of Northern Ireland on its way to the United States. My father told me that he remembered hearing the awful news of the disaster on May 6, 1937 on the wireless, probably the day after the disaster. He recalled how the radio journalist (called Herbert Morrison) broke down into tears when when he described the awful events he was witnessing live before him. It must have been very harrowing to listen to, especially considering my father had actually seen the airship flying over his country a while beforehand.

    Here is that harrowing radio report with accompanying footage of the disaster:



    In happier times for the Hindenburg here was The Saint author Leslie Charteris (1907-1993) talking about being a passenger on the zeppelin's maiden voyage. He speaks about his trip from Frankfurt, Germany to New Jersey, United States. The date was May 9, 1936, exactly a year to the day before the disaster occurred at the same location:


    Yes, that is the one, but there have been a couple other films about the same incident, and I don t know much about those. The disaster happened on May 6th, and yes I have heard that radio report before. A shame those airship flights went out of style, but here s hoping they return.

    Ah, I thought so. I'll have to see if I can catch it some time as it sounds interesting. It is a shame that mode of commercial travel came to an end but I suppose the disaster put paid to any hopes of it continuing from a public confidence point of view. I have heard that the original plan was to call the airship the Hitler (at Joseph Goebbels's suggestion) but it was decided to name it after the late German President Paul von Hindenburg instead. Imagine the propaganda and publicity fail for the regime if it had been called the Hitler!

    That s right. It was the Hindenburg disaster that put an end to commercial airship flights, even though it wasn t the first or the worst. This is why the airship scene in INDIANA JONES AND THE LAST CRUSADE is wrong, as that film takes place in 1938.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 19,232
    WHITE DOG (1982)

    d1q5y50y987t.png

    This is a pretty good horror/thriller by Samuel Fuller that deals with the subject of racism in a Cujo kind of way. Paul Winfield and Kristy McNichol play the leads. The screenplay was co-written by Curtis Hanson. Though nearly four decades old, I'd say this film is still very much relevant today.
  • mattjoesmattjoes matthaujoes
    Posts: 4,158
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    I'll tell you an interesting little personal family story about the Hindenburg. In 1937 my late father (who'd have been 13 at the time) was talking with his female next door neighbour at the stile that used to be between the two farms. All of a sudden his female neighbour gasped, "Tommy, what's that?!". It was the Hindenburg airship on its flight to the United States. My father had heard about the fact it was flying from Germany to the United States (probably on the wireless in the house) and he explained what it was and where it was going to her. It must have been a startling sight to people on the ground to witness the airship flying above a rural part of Northern Ireland with the drone of the engines and the vastness of its bulk. A check of its flight path online confirms that it did in fact flying over the far north of Northern Ireland on its way to the United States. My father told me that he remembered hearing the awful news of the disaster on May 6, 1937 on the wireless, probably the day after the disaster. He recalled how the radio journalist (called Herbert Morrison) broke down into tears when when he described the awful events he was witnessing live before him. It must have been very harrowing to listen to, especially considering my father had actually seen the airship flying over his country a while beforehand.

    That's a good (if sad) story, especially the bolded part.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,553
    KNOWING (Alex Proyas, 2009)
    R258532229c77d1b233982fe4272deca3?rik=czSc5zhBCoTNTw&riu=http%3a%2f%2fwww.freemovieposters.net%2fposters%2fknowing_2009_2318_poster.jpg&ehk=id3aPov4jAXZlRnGSRgyIUcX1AhfoOJiphA8p2l8AVM%3d&risl=&pid=ImgRaw
    Pretty exciting thriller with an interesting set-up, and a climax and conclusion I didn t expect.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 34,132
    @Thunderfinger, the climax is worth it alone. It's very ballsy and I definitely didn't see it coming.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,553
    THE BULLFIGHTERS (Mal St. Clair, 1945)
    image-w1280.jpg?size=740x
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy N.Ireland
    Posts: 12,487
    The Silencers on Amazon prime.
    First of the Matt Helm films, I have the box set, so do enjoy them, even if they are very silly and are basically Dean Martin playing at being a slightly alcoholic Secret Agent. A guilty pleasure of mine as I think the main saving grace of these films is the charm and personality of Dino.
  • Posts: 14,335
    KNOWING (Alex Proyas, 2009)
    R258532229c77d1b233982fe4272deca3?rik=czSc5zhBCoTNTw&riu=http%3a%2f%2fwww.freemovieposters.net%2fposters%2fknowing_2009_2318_poster.jpg&ehk=id3aPov4jAXZlRnGSRgyIUcX1AhfoOJiphA8p2l8AVM%3d&risl=&pid=ImgRaw
    Pretty exciting thriller with an interesting set-up, and a climax and conclusion I didn t expect.

    I think this movie is great I have it on Blu-ray, full of great idea's and thought provoking. I am a big fan of Proyas I make a point of seeking out his films. The Crow, Dark City and I Robot all good films.
  • DragonpolDragonpol The Crazy World of David Dragonpol
    Posts: 14,264
    mattjoes wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    I'll tell you an interesting little personal family story about the Hindenburg. In 1937 my late father (who'd have been 13 at the time) was talking with his female next door neighbour at the stile that used to be between the two farms. All of a sudden his female neighbour gasped, "Tommy, what's that?!". It was the Hindenburg airship on its flight to the United States. My father had heard about the fact it was flying from Germany to the United States (probably on the wireless in the house) and he explained what it was and where it was going to her. It must have been a startling sight to people on the ground to witness the airship flying above a rural part of Northern Ireland with the drone of the engines and the vastness of its bulk. A check of its flight path online confirms that it did in fact flying over the far north of Northern Ireland on its way to the United States. My father told me that he remembered hearing the awful news of the disaster on May 6, 1937 on the wireless, probably the day after the disaster. He recalled how the radio journalist (called Herbert Morrison) broke down into tears when when he described the awful events he was witnessing live before him. It must have been very harrowing to listen to, especially considering my father had actually seen the airship flying over his country a while beforehand.

    That's a good (if sad) story, especially the bolded part.

    Yes, I thought it was worth sharing. I've always found it fascinating that my Dad actually saw the airship passing over. It must've been quite a sight, complete with swastikas. Of course the horrors of World War II and the Holocaust were yet to occur but the Nazi regime was already making a name for itself. My grandfather (who I sadly never met as he died long before I was born) was given an English translation of Mein Kampf to read by a friend who said it showed all of the things Hitler planned to do, which it of course did.
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