Last Movie you Watched?

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  • Posts: 14,011
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    Logan 4K one of the best films in the genre. Indy 5 is in good hands with Mangold.

    I have the same feeling. What he did with the Old Man Logan concept was amazing. Perhaps he can do something similar in terms of originality and emotional impact with Old Man Indy.

    I was thinking that Old Man Indy whilst watching the film, the tone of Logan would be perfect.
  • talos7talos7 New Orleans
    Posts: 5,719
    Hugh-Jackman-as-Wolverine-in-Logan-copy.jpg
    Logan 4K one of the best films in the genre. Indy 5 is in good hands with Mangold.

    I have the same feeling. What he did with the Old Man Logan concept was amazing. Perhaps he can do something similar in terms of originality and emotional impact with Old Man Indy.
    And based on Ford vs Ferrari he can really capture different eras; it, and Logan are great looking films.

  • Posts: 210
    Logan is a very fine film indeed and I quite like the idea of an old man Indy vibe, but Logan was an emotionally dark film and I'm not sure I want that in an Indiana Jones film. Indy should be light and entertaining fun. If Mangold can crack that then that'll be fine
  • edited April 4 Posts: 4,589
    Wonder Woman 1984. It's a bit of a mess, really. Still, some good point, some good scenes, but it doesn't hold a candle to the first one. And
    Lynda Carter
    proves in one scene
    that she'll always be the greatest Wonder Woman of all
    .
  • Posts: 8,406
    Two more for the lost

    My big fat Greek wedding: I enjoy the film it’s a rom com with a weak plot but it works

    Batman:hush this review will be long as I will be commenting while watching

    5 minutes in I am actually turned off already the opening of the comic book was iconic with Croc instead the opening shot here is Bruce at a party with Selina and Thomas plus nightwing is vaguely doing cool things

    The change from Killer Croc to Bane makes me realize people don’t understand the character of bane like at all

    This Bane Brought to you by Joel Schumacher and Alkiva Goodman

    Also the kid is annoying

    And what is Lady shiva doing here ?

    Music is ok

    Poison ivy kissing catwoman is still hot

    Bane detour is pointless

    I dislike luthers voice

    Why did this have to be in the dcamu
    Ah the Batman Superman fight

    I hate Damian I mean I really really hate Damian who knew I would be missing Tim Drake

    Wow and I thought the young justice joker was bad this this wow

    I am sad we don’t see hush saying “he is innocent get the joke”


    A montage of Batman and catwoman fighting crime sigh

    The couple dialogue is bland to say the least
    thomas Elliot is not hush in this I am so freaking done

    Overall it’s well let’s just say I think killing joke is probably a better adaptation then this



    Films I have seen in 2001
    1. Casino Royale
    2. Quantum of solace
    3. My big fat Greek wedding
    4. Batman: dying is easy
    5. Across the universe
    6. Batman hush
    7. Batman ninja
    8. Casino Royale 1954

  • mattjoesmattjoes matthaujoes
    Posts: 4,088
    I went on a tour of mostly little-known films from the seventies and eighties. It was a fairly rewarding experience. I wasn't going to write too much about each film, but what the hell, they justify it and it's fun. In viewing order:

    FOXTROT (1976)

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    Peter O'Toole plays Liviu, an European aristocrat in the late 1930s, who goes to live in a deserted island with wife Julia (Charlotte Rampling) and friend and assistant Larsen (Max Von Sydow), to escape from the horrors of the war. The early scenes of the film already paint a morose picture of these people's lifestyle, as when we see them dancing, drinking or swimming in the island's waters, we get closeups of their stone-faced servants (especially Eusebio, played by Jorge Luke in a magnificent performance) that transform these moments of supposed happiness into something quite joyless. After they are forced to burn a crucial second boat they were expecting because of disease-carrying rats, they find themselves trapped on the island. Things get interesting as societal norms begin to break down between masters and servants, and resentment begins to rear its ugly face. It's a classic story: you can't run away from human decadence, because it's within you. I found a couple of aspects of the story a bit confusing, but I hope to better understand them in a second viewing. Still, I liked this one. It goes about its ugly business with a straight face; it never gets bogged down in melodrama. Claudio Brook (Montelongo from Licence to Kill) has a substantial supporting role. He also starred in director Arturo Ripstein's The Castle of Purity.

    THE BLOCKHOUSE (1973)

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    Quietly harrowing film, based on a novel about seven WW2 POWs who escape from an Allied bombing over German-occupied territory, by hiding in an underground bunker, whose entrance is later blocked by a bomb. At first they're ecstatic about being alive and safe, and the bunker is stocked with candles, wine and cheese, so all they have to do is wait for a rescue party, since digging their way out through reinforced concrete is out of the question. We see them finding ways to pass time, either getting drunk, playing chess or riding a bike in a makeshift racetrack. They barely appear to discuss their lives outside of the present situation, which gives the film an immediate, abstract quality, making it less about these trapped POWs and more about merely witnessing how human beings respond to imprisonment. Eventually it becomes apparent nobody is going to rescue them, and the candles start to run out (there is no electrical power either). When is life no longer worth living? A downbeat but interesting picture. It features an ensemble cast that includes Peter Sellers and Charles Aznavour. As I said, the film is based on a novel, but the novel is inspired by a supposed real event, that was reported in 1951 by Time Magazine, among other sources. In real life, the trapped people were in fact German soldiers, and two of them were eventually rescued. I say 'supposed' real event because a West German film from 1958 named Nasser Asphalt (Wet Asphalt) deals with a reporter that makes up a story just like this one, which implicitly seems to call into question the veracity of the event. Nonetheless, it's a fascinating premise for a story.

    DEADLOCK (1970)

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    The Kid, a criminal with a bullet hole in his arm, a briefcase full of money and an automatic weapon, arrives in a near-deserted mining town in the middle of nowhere to split the money with Sunshine, his sadistic partner in crime (played with quite the sense of threat by none other than Anthony Dawson!). Town resident Charles Dump is caught in the middle as he tries to take the money for himself. The setting is a big reason of why Deadlock works, as the town, with its crumbling, grimy buildings, has an ethereal, ghostly quality. We are never told where exactly is this place, and it's for the better. The film is fairly sparse in its storytelling, but it holds one's attention as the characters often seem to engage in cruelty out of sheer sadism or boredom, which stands in contrast to other films in which their actions would be more logic-driven. I found Dump to be an especially interesting character, as he tries time and time again to commit murder to get the money, but time and time again his more humane, or rather his weaker side, works against him. He's an indecisive, ambivalent and cowardly character, and I liked seeing the contrast between him and the other two leads. The film is often referred to as an Spaghetti Western, and to some extent it has a Western feel, but of course transported into the present day (there's a giant cowboy sign on the town, and it has a broken arm). But it's more psychological in nature than a Western would usually be. The music is by the band CAN, and its dissonant, degenerate sound suits the stark visuals on display.

    ABSOLUTION (1978)

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    I saw part of this psychological thriller on TV some twenty years ago. The Catholic boarding school surrounded by those dense woods makes for a foreboding location. Father Goddard, a stern teacher played by Richard Burton, is subjected to increasingly sinister, and eventually murderous pranks by a rebellious student. Burton really sells his character's existential anxiety at the situation; in fact, even before the pranks begin, he already appears to be somewhat repressed, a prisoner of his religious lifestyle, which has turned him into a somewhat cold-hearted man. This film required an actor of high caliber to make its twists and surprises have an impact on the audience, and Burton is up to the task-- the ending is fairly hard-hitting thanks to him. The actors playing the students are also quite good. Stanley Myers' memorable opening banjo piece gives Absolution a suitable feeling of folksy horror. I enjoyed this one.

    HOFFMAN (1970)

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    Peter Sellers plays the title role in a really good and provocative drama that they just wouldn't make today. Hoffman finds evidence incriminating Tom, an employee of his, of conspiring to rob him, and threatens to call the police, unless Ms. Smith, Tom's fellow employee and girlfriend, spends a few days at Hoffman's place, as he vies for her romantic affections, despite claiming otherwise. Initially appearing quite dominating and threatening, Hoffman's thoughts on women eventually betray a weak, pathetic and disillusioned character, with a childish, unrealistic view of relationships, and it's interesting to see the film go to different emotional places as Ms. Smith alternates between repulsion and affection toward this man. The poster makes this film seem like a comedy, but it's not. It's a mostly serious film about a flawed and desperate man and a woman who might or might not look past that. Sinéad Cusack, an actress I wasn't familiar with except for her relationship to Cyril Cusack and Jeremy Irons, is highly compelling as Sellers' co-star. Sellers himself is always a delight to watch. I found the music score by Ron Grainer very beautiful, and despite it being a little too animated, I wasn't bothered by it.

    THE GREAT MCGONAGALL (1974)

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    Probably one of the quirkiest films I've ever seen. It's a biography of sorts of William McGonagall, a 19th century poet famous for being, well, bad. Spike Milligan plays him, with Peter Sellers co-starring as Queen Victoria. The cast also features John Bluthal and Victor Spinetti, both of whom Pink Panther fans might remember from The Return of the Pink Panther. The whole film was shot in Wilton's Music Hall in London. Without any particularly strong attempt to hide the artifice, the place doubles for pubs, mountains, theaters and houses-- it's fascinating stuff. The film references several events in McGonagall's life, such as his trip to Balmoral Castle to see Queen Victoria, which was a failure as he was rejected at the gates. The Great McGonagall is full of insane humor: dwarf postmen, pies and boxing gloves hitting people in the face, characters getting into bed with other characters mid-conversation for no apparent reason. I really missed having English subtitles and it wasn't very funny (except for this bit, which I love), but I've never seen anything else like it, and I appreciated watching it on that basis. Also, the ending is very touching in an unexpected way. I leave you with a substantial article on Kettering magazine regarding the film, with interviews with the director and several members of the cast: http://www.bodnotbod.org.uk/kettering/Kettering1.pdf

    THE OPTIMISTS OF NINE ELMS (1973)

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    Peter Sellers plays a poor London street musician who meets two children that live nearby, and becomes a kind of surrogate father for them, as their real parents are too busy at work trying to get the family's financial situation to improve. The first hour is a bit uneventful, but the film gets more interesting as it goes along, building up to a nice conclusion about how we can sometimes fail to nurture the relationships with our loved ones. There are dogs in the film: they are not only cute, but also function as a symbol of sorts for the characters' longings. Sellers is terrific as usual, fake nose and everything, though I wish the film had told us something about his music hall past. The child actors and their parents are well cast (David Daker as the father especially gets to shine at the end). Great location shooting in London that goes beyond the typical landmarks and has a down-to-earth, documentary feel. The modern buildings the children visit about halfway through the film stand in stark visual contrast to the other old-fashioned locations, which reinforces one of the film's subject matters, that of times gone by. The music score is by George Martin and is fairly charming.

    THE MEDUSA TOUCH (1978)

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    This film begins as a police procedural and slowly transforms into a supernatural thriller. It does a terrific job at it, I must say. Richard Burton plays John Morlar, a barrister-turned-novelist, who through the years, seems to have caused several accidents and catastrophes --which resulted in the death of a number of people-- solely through the power of his mind. By means of flashbacks, we explore his life and the events that shaped his pessimistic, misanthropic worldview, and we get to witness several displays of his unusual powers. Burton also gets to deliver some exquisite speeches with that dark, powerful voice of his. It's fascinating to discover the contradiction that exists in Morlar's mind, seeing he thinks of himself and his "gift" as embodying the worst qualities of the human race, while simultaneously being repelled by them when witnessing them in other people, using his powers to strike against them. While Morlar is the character around which the entire story revolves, he spends much of the present time of the film in a coma, which leaves second-billed Lino Ventura as the actual lead of the film, the character propelling the story. Ventura is terrific as Inspector Brunel, bringing an intelligent, no-nonsense quality to the role. He's surrounded by a top-notch cast which includes brief but splendid appearances by actors like Derek Jacobi and Jeremy Brett. Going back to Ventura, it is during the truly unnerving last moments of the film that the impact of his performance is most strongly felt, but I can only discuss that within a spoiler tag, so here it goes.
    In the last scene, Brunel tries to disconnect Morlar from the hospital's life support system to stop him. We realize Morlar no longer needs it to stay alive, and he hints at his next catastrophe, and possibly the end of the world down the line. At this point, we have been following Brunel throughout the entire film, and he has proven to be smart, resourceful and open-minded. So, seeing this specific character's fearful expression, when looking at Morlar's brainwave monitor, really drives home the point that we are at the mercy of a force much more powerful than ourselves. Cue Michael J. Lewis' urgent, tense music and the end credits, and the nightmare is only getting started.

    NOSFERATU A VENEZIA (VAMPIRE IN VENICE) (1988)

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    The atmosphere of this film is truly off the charts. At star Klaus Kinski's insistence, shots were captured of him walking through a fog-covered Venice at dawn, and their mysterious, dreamlike quality is highly engrossing. Early in the film, flashbacks of the 1786 Carnival of Venice show us a city ravaged by the plague, while a costumed inhabitant still dances through the misty streets in the aftermath of a celebration that came to an abrupt end. A costume party later on has much of the same oneiric feel. All these images are greatly complimented by a beautiful synthesized score by Luigi Ceccarelli (based on Vangelis' album Mask). Unfortunately, for all these good qualities, the plot of Nosferatu a Venezia is a mess and its characters are underdeveloped and underused, probably because filming came to a close with much of the script yet to be shot, no doubt in part because of Kinski's usual shenanigans. Also, the climactic scenes of the film are devoid of much-needed dramatic intensity. At least Christopher Plummer gives the film his all in the role of Professor Van Helsing Paris Catalano, who is after Kinski's Nosferatu, and Kinski himself brings a certain power and a sense of tragedy to his role with mostly physical acting. The atmosphere of this movie makes it pleasant enough to watch, but witnessing the unexplored potential and obvious areas of improvement is frustrating.

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    KINSKI PAGANINI (1989)

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    For the most part, it's Kinski/Paganini playing the fiddle or walking down the street in slow motion, while women have sexual fantasies about him, or have sex with him, or are abandoned by him. The rest of the time, we see him riding around in horse-drawn carriages, or physically expressing affection toward his son (played by his son) in weird, uncomfortable ways. The film is basically one long montage, with barely any dialogue. Nonetheless, it manages to present an interesting idea, about Kinski/Paganini's immoral tendencies being impossible to separate from his virtuoso violin playing, a thought which is even more provocative when viewed through a religious prism, as the film does. Beyond that, the picture doesn't offer much food for thought, since it's more about erecting a visceral monument of adoration to Kinski and his alter-ego, Paganini. With his jet-black hair and ugly, aged face, Kinski looks like some kind of neanderthal, and I wouldn't be surprised if he was going for that effect, since at the beginning he is said to be hideous and pathetic-looking, yet the women can't help but go absolutely crazy about him when he plays that violin. A monotonously paced and slow-moving film, but there some degree of fascination in its montage style --its kaleidoscope of sights and sounds-- and its eschewing of dialogue. Also, the boldness and egomania of Kinski are something to behold. Analyzed from a certain point of view, the film is laughable, but Kinski takes it so seriously that one does too, to a certain extent (I can't think of another film whose title includes the director/actor's name-- I love it!). One final note, before I forget: the film was directed by Klaus Kinski.

    I then decided to go in a more mainstream direction, with

    NOVOCAINE (2001)

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    Steve Martin stars as dentist Frank Sangster, a client of whom seduces him before stealing drugs from his clinic. He's eventually framed for murdering the client's brother, and must try to clear his name. It's a crime story with a cynical and disillusioned (though admittedly, not overly grim) worldview. On that basis, Novocaine appears to aim for film noir, and in noir tradition, Sangster makes his share of bad choices, such as falling for the femme fatale. But Novocaine is not without a sense of humor. For the most part, Martin plays it straight, and very well too, but amusing supporting characters come and go throughout the film and give it some levity. I really liked the plot and the performances (I'd like to single out underrated actor Elias Koteas as Martin's brother). I think the film is slightly jarring in how it transitions back and forth between relatively more serious and relatively more funny moments, but since the tonal difference isn't that strong, it's only a minor issue. The ending is something else! I'll definitely watch this one again; it's great fun.
  • Posts: 4,589
    Of all the movies you cite, the only one I've seen is The Medusa Touch, and I agree with you, it's a great movie.

    Now, on to me : Today, I revisited The Abominable Dr. Phibes, with Vincent Price. A great horror classic of the 70s, but still influential today. And featuring two Bond lovelies, to boot : Virginia North (Olympe, Draco's mistress in OHMSS) as the mute but eerie and fashionable Vulnavia, and Caroline Munro (Naomi in TSWLM) in a very flat part (a first for her, for sure). Too bad I have to wait until june to get a french Blu-Ray release of the follow-up, but it will be worth the wait, I think.
  • Posts: 14,011
    Good selection there @mattjoes I vividly remember the first time I watched THE OPTIMISTS OF NINE ELMS (1973) it was in my first year of secondary school in English class.

    I started watching The Medusa Touch on TV a few years ago though stopped watching as it grabbed my attention so ordered the Blu-ray, yet to watch it all the way through.
  • Posts: 1,280
    Just watched John Wick, the first time I'd seen any movie from that series. That was intense, and I asked myself if I really needed to see that. Still trying to come down from the intensity. I don't think I've seen a movie where there were that many kills. That said, Keanu was good, same with Ian McShane and Willem Dafoe.
  • Posts: 3,135
    Thrasos wrote: »
    Just watched John Wick, the first time I'd seen any movie from that series. That was intense, and I asked myself if I really needed to see that. Still trying to come down from the intensity. I don't think I've seen a movie where there were that many kills. That said, Keanu was good, same with Ian McShane and Willem Dafoe.

    Wait til you get to the sequels!!
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 6,187
    Mathis1 wrote: »
    Thrasos wrote: »
    Just watched John Wick, the first time I'd seen any movie from that series. That was intense, and I asked myself if I really needed to see that. Still trying to come down from the intensity. I don't think I've seen a movie where there were that many kills. That said, Keanu was good, same with Ian McShane and Willem Dafoe.

    Wait til you get to the sequels!!

    I was just thinking the same thing!
  • Posts: 3,135
    Go Kart Go (1963)
    From the Childrens Film Foundation (who remembers them?)
    This was great fun , boys own story, this tells the simple tale of local kids (lead by a very young Dennis Waterman!) taking on the bullys ( lead by Frazier Hynes!) in a Go Kart derby!
    Haven't enjoyed a movie so much in a long while. Ideal Bank Holiday entertainment!
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 34,015
    Thrasos wrote: »
    Just watched John Wick, the first time I'd seen any movie from that series. That was intense, and I asked myself if I really needed to see that. Still trying to come down from the intensity. I don't think I've seen a movie where there were that many kills. That said, Keanu was good, same with Ian McShane and Willem Dafoe.

    Yes, you're in for a real treat with the sequels, and the inevitable fourth installment that's gearing up to shoot in June (Reeves was just spotted in Berlin, one of the major locations for filming).
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Hamburg, near the Atlantic Hotel
    edited April 8 Posts: 5,945
    Tonight: My all-time favourite Alfred Hitchcock movie, and one of the best ever, again:
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  • mattjoesmattjoes matthaujoes
    Posts: 4,088
    Good selection there @mattjoes I vividly remember the first time I watched THE OPTIMISTS OF NINE ELMS (1973) it was in my first year of secondary school in English class.
    That's cool, @Fire_and_Ice_Returns! It's a good film.

    I started watching The Medusa Touch on TV a few years ago though stopped watching as it grabbed my attention so ordered the Blu-ray, yet to watch it all the way through.
    It's a great one, as @Gerard says. I trust you'll enjoy it!
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 1,032
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    Tonight: My all-time favourite Alfred Hitchcock movie, and one of the best ever, again:
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    A great pick @j_w_pepper (you have a great taste in films 😊). “Psycho” and “The Birds” would be my other picks, but there are a lot of great Hitchcock films.

    Eva Marie Saint’s Eve Kendall is (IMO) a proto version of the Bond fem-fatale IMO.
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 1,032
    Shin Godzilla (2016 / dir. Hideaki Anno and Shinji Higuchi).

    With all of the hype surrounding Legendary Pictures’ “Godzilla vs. Kong” (2021), I thought that I would revisit some of my favorite Godzilla films from the past. To date, “Shin Godzilla” (2016) is the most recent “live-action” Godzilla movie produced by Toho (three amine movies were released in 2018-2019). It is also one of the best.

    While there have been numerous ‘soft-reboots’ of the Godzilla franchise over the years (film to film continuity being something that Toho almost plots against 😊), “Shin Godzilla” brought with it a completely new origin story, and in many ways, does for the Toho Godzilla franchise what Casino Royale did for the James Bond films back in 2006.

    Yet in other – and very important - ways, it stays true to the spirit of the original “Gojira” (1954), in that Godzilla’s presence here is used as an allegory and not merely a giant movie monster. Instead of the nuclear bomb, this time a Godzilla film is used to hold up a mirror to the Japanese government’s response (or lack thereof) during the twin 2011 Tōhoku earthquake / tsunami and Fukushima nuclear plant disasters. And while other Godzilla films have a “what is Godzilla was real?” plot line (especially 1984’s “Return of Godzilla"), this is – by far – the most effective treatment of the idea IMO.

    Importantly, the film doesn’t portray the government leaders and officials as incompetent, but instead looks at them as being well-intentioned but strait-jacketed by rules and bureaucracy. A dialogue heavy film, it is humous to see flocks of officials move from one conference room to another to discuss “what to do” as Godzilla finally makes landfall. Note, however, that some of this – in the film’s POV – is a result of Japan’s subservient relationship with the United States.

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    In the view of the film, the U.S. imposed constitutional structure doesn’t always allow for independent thought or action by Japan’s leaders. Ultimately, by the film’s conclusion, it is the drive of government “outsiders” and enlightened officials who are willing to think outside the box, that save the day and defeat Godzilla. Or rather, pause the clock before the U.S. can take unilateral action.

    Release in Japan during the summer of 2016, it received a very limited 10 day run in the United States (w/English subtitles only) in October of that year - which meant that few casual fans actually had a chance to see it. Fortunately, it has been released on DVD and is currently available on at-least one streaming platform. And based on some of the Godzilla retrospectives currently be posted to the internet, is now widely considered to be among the best of the series.

    And whatever one thinks of the film’s POV, it did resonant with the Japanese public, as it went on to be the largest grossing live action film in Japan during 2016 (foreign or domestic). Before winning their version of the “Academy Award for Best Picture.”

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    In short, there is a lot to recommend to “Shin Godzilla”, but if you are looking for Godzilla vs. (insert name here) type battles look elsewhere. Also, this is a movie with a decided political point of view as one reviewer called it “Godzilla meets the West Wing.” It does, however, contain one of the most destructive – yet poetic - scenes in any Godzilla film to date, and it has an ending that will leave you wondering what will happen next (*), as Godzilla – frozen in place in downtown Tokyo - appears to be evolving to overcome this challenge.



    A shot of Godzilla’s tail before the closing credits…….
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    For more, see: “SHIN GODZILLA: SPECTERS OF FUKUSHIMA, HIROSHIMA, AND ARTICLE 9”
    https://newbloommag.net/2016/09/21/shin-godzilla-review/

    ** It appears that this will not be part of the story line to any future Toho Godzilla series. In short, don’t expect Shin Godzilla II. Rather, it is believed that Toho will actually follow the “monster-verse” type formula


  • RichardTheBruceRichardTheBruce I'm motivated by my Duty.
    Posts: 8,323
    Enjoyed your comments, @Dwayne.

    My family and I saw Shin Godzilla here in Northern Virginia, outside DC, during its release in theaters 2016. We enjoyed it, my son and daughter reacted to some of the social commentary you noted. Specifically for them, the ineffective reactions of the bureaucrats to the developing crisis. This struck a nerve in large part since we were living outside Tokyo during the 3/11 earthquake/tsunami in 2011. And the film uses plus goes beyond the original Gojira ties to nuclear fears with a contemporary feel for disaster.

    We departed Japan a little over a year later, so it's a significant event for us.

    A good film as you said.
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  • Posts: 1,280
    All three Austin Powers movies, on TV. It was fun to see them again for their humor, and also as nods to the Bond films.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,195
    Personally, I don t get the Austin Powers humour. I have more fun going to the dentist.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    edited April 9 Posts: 19,028
    Personally, I don t get the Austin Powers humour. I have more fun going to the dentist.

    That's the nitrous oxide at the dentist's talking, @Thunderfinger! :)
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,195
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    Personally, I don t get the Austin Powers humour. I have more fun going to the dentist.

    That's the nitrous oxide at the dentist's talking, @Thunderfinger! :)

    They stopped using that here many years ago, and the tanks were dumped at the garbage heap. I knew some people who went there looking for them.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,195
    THE MIDNIGHT SKY (George Clooney, 2020)
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    Not great, but interesting enough, and with a cool twist at the end.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,195
    HOW THE WEST WAS WON(Henry Hathaway/John Ford/John Marshall, 1962)

    Never saw this before, but followed the 1970s tv series that was loosely based on it. It was a Saturday evening highlight. This motion picture was again based on an article series, and it was no highlight. Pretty weak script, awful dialogue, uninteresting story. Silly and romanticized fluff, accentuated by the ditto score by Alfred Newman, father of Thomas.

    On a technical and cinematic level, it is an acchievement. You can see this cost money, and there is one great scene in it, involving some extremely dangerous stunt work.

  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,195
    THE FINAL COUNTDOWN(1980)
    Haven t seen this since the 80s, so didn t remember much other than the premise for the plot. Interesting enough, not great. Soon-Teck Oh has a part, and Maurice Binder is special effects supervisor.
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy N.Ireland
    Posts: 12,063
    I'd only read about THE FINAL COUNTDOWN(1980) in various movie books, and
    when I finally got to see it a few years ago. I too thought it was just OK. More like
    an over long " Twilight Zone" or " Outer Limits " episode.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,195
    I'd only read about THE FINAL COUNTDOWN(1980) in various movie books, and
    when I finally got to see it a few years ago. I too thought it was just OK. More like
    an over long " Twilight Zone" or " Outer Limits " episode.

    Yes, exactly. Something like that. In Norway it was renamed as USS NIMITZ-LOST IN THE PACIFIC. I have never understood why some English titles got changed into another English title back then, except in terms of duplicate titles or legal rights. It was fun seeing it again after all these years, but twice in a lifetime is enough.
  • Posts: 488
    Final Countdown, now that’s a film I haven’t thought about for decades. I saw it in the cinema with my dad when it was released. Excellent premise, but they should have done more with it. Seemed a bit of a waste of a good idea, really.
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy N.Ireland
    Posts: 12,063
    Telefon (1977) with Charles Bronson, Donald Pleasance and Lee Remick is a
    Cold war thriller. Someone is activating Russian " Sleeper" agents, who have
    been hypnotised to attack selected Military targets.
    I remember seeing this as a Kid, and still think it's a fun movie. The idea of
    Hypnotised sleeper agents was also used in a New Avengers two part story
    " K is for Kill" and obviously " The naked Gun " .

  • 007InAction007InAction Australia
    Posts: 1,071
    The Mechanic (1972)
    One of charles's best.
    the-mechanic-scorpion-releasing.jpg
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