Quentin Tarantino: A Reflection On His Movies and His Opinions

MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
Quentin Tarantino: A force of cinematic uniqueness. Let's talk about his viewpoints, his movies, his unmade projects and his controversial opinions on other movies. My favorites are Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, Django Unchained and Once Upon A Time In Hollywood. My least favorite is Inglourious Basterds, as it seems that he was too high on his ego. True Romance is a part of his shared universe.

I highly recommend his books: Once Upon A Time In Hollywood (the novelization) and Cinema Speculation. I hope he writes his unmade Double V Vega prequel to RD and PF, since he can't make it into a movie. A regular book or graphic novel would be fine.

If IFP wants to hire him as a Bond author, I would greatly approve of that. I hope he talks more about his take on Casino Royale, in a memoir one day. If he wants to become a full time novelist after retiring movies, I would greatly approve. He's a better writer than a director.
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Comments

  • Posts: 3,387
    Can't say I particularly like any of his movies past Inglroious Basterds myself, but I'm also a big fan of Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction and even Death Proof.

    While I'm glad we never got his version of Casino Royale, or indeed any other Bond film by him, he's definitely a distinctive voice in cinema.
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 4,306
    007HallY wrote: »
    Can't say I particularly like any of his movies past Inglroious Basterds myself, but I'm also a big fan of Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction and even Death Proof.

    While I'm glad we never got his version of Casino Royale, or indeed any other Bond film by him, he's definitely a distinctive voice in cinema.

    He is. However, I think his writing is his best talent. Like I said, I would trust him to write a Bond Continuation Novel. For now, bring on The Films of Rick Dalton (his supposed next book)!
  • Posts: 5,905
    Watching Kill Bill Vol. 2, I've always thought that Quentin Tarentino would have been ideal for writing and directing a Bond movie, especially for the scene where Daryl Hannah talks about the black mamba. That's something Fleming (who loved this kind of digressions, witness the Player's sailor scene in the novel Thunderball) would have written.

    In other news, London will see the premiere of a "Quentin Tarentino immersive musical" this summer :

    https://www.radiotimes.com/going-out/tickets/tarantino-live-tickets/

    The title will say something to those who watched Pulp Fiction : Fox Force Five & The Tyranny of Evil Men. Could be interesting.
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 4,306
    Gerard wrote: »
    Watching Kill Bill Vol. 2, I've always thought that Quentin Tarentino would have been ideal for writing and directing a Bond movie, especially for the scene where Daryl Hannah talks about the black mamba. That's something Fleming (who loved this kind of digressions, witness the Player's sailor scene in the novel Thunderball) would have written.

    In other news, London will see the premiere of a "Quentin Tarentino immersive musical" this summer :

    https://www.radiotimes.com/going-out/tickets/tarantino-live-tickets/

    The title will say something to those who watched Pulp Fiction : Fox Force Five & The Tyranny of Evil Men. Could be interesting.

    Another book, possibly?
  • Posts: 1,711
    For me a great film is one I want to rewatch from time to time. I've never felt that way about QT's films. His films are more of a curiosity than a must see. I see them and move on. I recognize he has a huge following, I just don't count myself among them. We like what we like irrespective of praise or disdain.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    Posts: 8,826
    I can see what @CrabKey's criteria are. I have somewhat mixed feelings about QT's films, but yet I've rewatched a few of them more than I rewatched others and maybe even some Bond movies (though I doubt that part). I don't think any QT movie has actually disappointed me in terms of entertainment, but that doesn't mean one has to go along with each of his directorial (or scriptwriting) decisions. I can see why people wopuld be less than thrilled by his films.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    edited April 2023 Posts: 23,841
    I'm a HUGE fan of QT's work. What can I say? I was in my early teens when he made RD and PF. He became the voice of a generation -- my generation, kids of the '90s. I was also that kid who, early on, started to explore older movies. When QT made JB, I had just turned 16, and unlike several of my classmates, I "got" the movie, although it wasn't my favourite of his at the time. Now, it's one of his very best IMO. Around the time when I entered maturity, so did QT; i.e. after the 'fun' of KB and DP, we got IB, DU and TH8 -- all three of these, films that I massively enjoyed, and still do to this day. OUATIH is what it is, a love letter to a very specific era in a very specific town with nods to a very specific event. I liked it, but I have yet to rewatch it. But all QT's movies range from really good to awesome in my book. He hasn't given me anything not to enjoy yet.

    I also like some of his other work like including True Romance, but I was never particularly fond of Natural Born Killers (controversial opinion, perhaps?)
  • SecretAgentMan⁰⁰⁷SecretAgentMan⁰⁰⁷ Lekki, Lagos, Nigeria
    edited April 2023 Posts: 1,643
    I enjoy his dialogue, suspense, and his build-up to action and big reveals. But I'm not a fan of his, because I can't help but think he secretly enjoys violence. Violent directors like Sam Peckinpah, Ridley Scott, John Woo, Tony Scott, Michael Bay, etc. do their violence for the visual spectacle they love. That's why most of their violence happens quickly and stylishly and have rewatch value. But with Tarantino, he seems to want to take the violence slowly. Like having a guy tied to a chair and torturing him. So I just can't help but think he wishes he can be that violent in real life. Maybe it's a fetish of his...I don't know. I watch his films...no doubt. But I hardly rewatch them....maybe Inglorious Basterds is the one I've re-watched the most....because of Brad Pitt and because it's really entertaining. If Tarantino directed CR, the ball-busting scene would have been unwatchable. Thank goodness he has never directed a Bond film and would likely never direct a Bond film.
  • peterpeter Toronto
    Posts: 9,052
    I think the opening of INGLORIOUS BASTERDS (sp. inc) was the best thing put to film in the last fifty years… (dating back to GF I&II). I can watch this little “short film” over and over. Suspense in action, it’s like an elastic band being pulled from either end…. Just ready to snap, until—

    Scene over.

    A masterpiece!
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,841
    peter wrote: »
    I think the opening of INGLORIOUS BASTERDS (sp. inc) was the best thing put to film in the last fifty years… (dating back to GF I&II). I can watch this little “short film” over and over. Suspense in action, it’s like an elastic band being pulled from either end…. Just ready to snap, until—

    Scene over.

    A masterpiece!

    I cannot disagree with that. Landa is such a delicious role for Walt but the entire architecture of this scene is nothing short of perfect. Tension is built in ways few films still can these days.
  • peterpeter Toronto
    Posts: 9,052
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    peter wrote: »
    I think the opening of INGLORIOUS BASTERDS (sp. inc) was the best thing put to film in the last fifty years… (dating back to GF I&II). I can watch this little “short film” over and over. Suspense in action, it’s like an elastic band being pulled from either end…. Just ready to snap, until—

    Scene over.

    A masterpiece!

    I cannot disagree with that. Landa is such a delicious role for Walt but the entire architecture of this scene is nothing short of perfect. Tension is built in ways few films still can these days.

    👍🏻 👍🏻 👍🏻
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,102
    I dunno if Tarantino would have been great for Bond or CASINO ROYALE. However, I would love to see a new Bond movie that had the kind of tension that INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS had in several scenes, like in the milk farm and the tavern. That’s the kind of thing I wish modern Bond movies did more of.
  • Posts: 7,506
    CrabKey wrote: »
    For me a great film is one I want to rewatch from time to time. I've never felt that way about QT's films. His films are more of a curiosity than a must see. I see them and move on. I recognize he has a huge following, I just don't count myself among them. We like what we like irrespective of praise or disdain.

    Interesting. For me it's the complete opposite. There are many directors I value just as much, but very few of them are as rewatchable as Tarantino's.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,102
    Forgot to mention. I actually just caught a 35mm screening of ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD at Tarantino’s theater in Hollywood. Was really fun to see in a packed theaters.
  • peterpeter Toronto
    Posts: 9,052
    Forgot to mention. I actually just caught a 35mm screening of ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD at Tarantino’s theater in Hollywood. Was really fun to see in a packed theaters.

    I think this is his greatest film; the bromance showed an elite storyteller, in the prime of his powers, who really made a passionate, sweet and believable story about friendship.

  • Posts: 7,506
    peter wrote: »
    Forgot to mention. I actually just caught a 35mm screening of ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD at Tarantino’s theater in Hollywood. Was really fun to see in a packed theaters.

    I think this is his greatest film; the bromance showed an elite storyteller, in the prime of his powers, who really made a passionate, sweet and believable story about friendship.

    Yeah, I dare say it's underappreciated. Maybe even a little misunderstood. It's labeled as a celebration of 60s Hollywood and Sharon Tate (which it also is), but at it's heart it is as you say a story about friendship, and a touching one at that.
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    edited April 2023 Posts: 4,306
    peter wrote: »
    Forgot to mention. I actually just caught a 35mm screening of ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD at Tarantino’s theater in Hollywood. Was really fun to see in a packed theaters.

    I think this is his greatest film; the bromance showed an elite storyteller, in the prime of his powers, who really made a passionate, sweet and believable story about friendship.

    This is true. I highly recommend his novelization for it. It’s different from the movie, in a good way. Another reason that I think he should really give Double V Vega a book.

    Inglorious Basterds is his most overrated. After that great tense opening scene, never lives up to that greatness again. Only when Hans Landa is on screen does it come close. I’ve said it before, it’s similar to another 2009 film: Avatar. Both writer/directors getting lost in their egos. At least QT wrote something original. While I like IB, it’s honestly my least favorite QT movie.

    Jackie Brown is underrated, it makes you think about who’s playing who. Some of the best acting from his movies.

    Some actors that I would like to see QT work with are: Jeff Bridges, Pierce Brosnan, Michelle Pfeiffer, Ralph Fiennes, Adam Sandler, Javier Bardem, Michael Shannon, Judy Greer, Jessica Chastain, Ryan Reynolds, Anne Hathaway, Gal Gadot, Ana de Armas, and Saoirse Ronan just to name a few. If he can fit them into The Movie Critic, or if he doesn’t retire afterwords these are some interesting people for him. NOT Scarlett Johansson or Jennifer Lawrence! Too overexposed, and one-note.
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    Posts: 3,985
    When I saw Reservoir Dogs at the London film festival in 93' I knew this guy was something special. It was the best film I'd seen in years. I got his autograph as he hung around in Leicester Square after the screening. All I could manage when I spoke to him was a rather lame, "The film was excellent!!!"

    One of the few directors that have me excited with anticipation when they have a new film project...
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 4,306
    When I saw Reservoir Dogs at the London film festival in 93' I knew this guy was something special. It was the best film I'd seen in years. I got his autograph as he hung around in Leicester Square after the screening. All I could manage when I spoke to him was a rather lame, "The film was excellent!!!"

    One of the few directors that have me excited with anticipation when they have a new film project...

    Same here, any project that he's directing and particularly writing, has my interest. His work is the equivalent of a new Batman, Superman, Bond or Holmes story being told.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,102
    First time I saw Tarantino films they were blind DVD purchases. My Blockbuster did not have Reservoir Dogs or Pulp Fiction available for rental. However, they were selling new copies of the DVDs so I bit the bullet and bought both. They were my first blind purchases ever made for films. I wasn’t disappointed.
  • Posts: 7,506
    Those two first films are still his best. I wish he would make more in the same style.
  • edited April 2023 Posts: 17,492
    For someone who's not a fan of Christopher Nolan and James Cameron, Quentin Tarantino is probably the only director -for me – where the director is the main reason to watch a film, rather than the cast – or the plot for that matter. Although I've never been much of a fan of Kill Bill: Vol. 1/2, I love the rest of his filmography.

    Like @peter mentions above, the opening of Inglourious Basterds is, to me as well, something of the best stuff put to film in a long time. That film was somewhat ruined on my first viewing when two couples sitting in the back row at the theatre started complaining about the lack of action and "all that damn talking" midway through the film – shortly before they exited the screening…

    And on the subject of talking: dialogue is probably one of the things I love the most about Tarantino films. I could happily watch a Tarantino film that is just two characters talking about "stuff", in a diner, a car or whatever.
  • R1s1ngs0nR1s1ngs0n France
    Posts: 2,039
    QT being one of my favorite directors, here is my ranking of his films:
    Jackie Brown - for me, it's his undisputed masterpiece. It's perfect in every way.
    Pulp Fiction
    Inglourious Basterds
    Reservoir Dogs
    The Hateful Eight
    Once Upon A Time... In Hollywood
    Kill Bill: Volume 1
    Kill Bill: Volume 2
    Django Unchained
    Deathproof
  • mattjoesmattjoes DAY OF THE BROSNAN
    Posts: 6,933
    Quentin Tamahori is one of the best filmmakers, and simultaneously one of the worst. First he makes Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction and Jackie Brown, three terrific films, and then he makes something like DAD. What's up with that?
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,102
    What film of his is like DAD?
  • mattjoesmattjoes DAY OF THE BROSNAN
    edited May 2023 Posts: 6,933
    What film of his is like DAD?

    It was a joke, conflating Tarantino with Tamahori because of the similarity in their last names.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    Posts: 8,826
    And here I was thinking that Tamahori was a digital pet.
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