NTTD & Corona

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  • Precisely - these delays are just cowardly on the part of the film studios.
  • Posts: 832
    Everything before October is going to be delayed or vod. It’s not cowardly, it’s necessary.
  • It's cowardly because they're leaving cinemas out to dry.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 8,134
    All of this "cowardly" talk is a very broad stroke dismissal of a very complicated situation, lads.
  • Posts: 1,314
    It's cowardly because they're leaving cinemas out to dry.

    I think it's more that most people are rightly more concerned about their elderly and vulnerable relatives dying than watching a film.
  • JamesBondKenyaJamesBondKenya Danny Boyle laughs to himself
    Posts: 2,730
    It’s naive of the producers to assume that the Covid stuff will be better in April and that cinemas will be open in April.
  • All of this "cowardly" talk is a very broad stroke dismissal of a very complicated situation, lads.
    Cowardly because they're potentially abandoning cinemas by depriving them of business (whether's that by further delays or dumping films onto VOD).
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 8,134
    It’s naive of the producers to assume that the Covid stuff will be better in April and that cinemas will be open in April.

    I don't think they're really assuming anything at this point. I think they're hoping, more so.
    All of this "cowardly" talk is a very broad stroke dismissal of a very complicated situation, lads.
    Cowardly because they're potentially abandoning cinemas by depriving them of business (whether's that by further delays or dumping films onto VOD).

    Yeah, I didn't misunderstand your previous comments. It's still a broad stroke dismissal of a very complicated situation.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    edited October 2020 Posts: 8,093
    All of this "cowardly" talk is a very broad stroke dismissal of a very complicated situation, lads.

    It's fanboy entitlement.
    Death of cinema.
    You're a cheerful person, aren't you.
    Another harsh truth is that cinemas need audiences, and they did not turn up enough for TENET, NEW MUTANTS, UNHINGED, or whatever. This was why studios have recently pushed back all their big films just a few days after TENET opened abysmally.

    Until people feel safe going to the movies, theater chains are not going to be the place they want to go to no matter what films are out.

    @DaltonCraig007 was spot on about this.
    The thing is, this virus could be with be with us for potentially years, so people have got to some degree to learn to live with it (whilst also being cautious). If the cinemas suffer or go under, it's partially down to the public's fear or apprehension about going to the cinema. It's a chicken and egg situation.
    Don't feed DaltonCraig007's ego even more, please. He was a very unpleasant person to me - I'm glad to not be reading his superior, self-righteous, bullying posts on this situation.

    He was giving us the straight cold hard facts and you got too touchy over them, disregarding them as "being negative" and giving him crap for it.

    What did you expect? STUDIOS ARE A BUSINESS. Harp all you like about the need for entertainment, arts, and escapism, it doesn't change the fact that if the numbers don't line up there's no business. The studios likely found out that whatever numbers NTTD would have drawn up in November wasn't enough.

    Theaters are better off staying in hibernation at this point and getting bail out money from governments, rather than running theaters for only five people to show up in total to every screening.

    Just accept the fact that movies are not going to come out until much later.
  • edited October 2020 Posts: 6,687
    Cinemas are one of many structures that are at risk right now. Talking about artistic venues and schedules, can you imagine how a dance company will cope, or a choir of large dimension, or an orchestra? Theatre, as our own Judi Dench has said, is facing a very opaque future. All of the performatic arts are. Everything that depends on a gathering of people is at risk of not existing anymore. And not because they'll have to wait it out. But because waiting it out means ceasing to exist.

    Right now, they're all trying their very best to keep their relevance and they're being resistant to a change that would potentially obliterate them and their means of living.

    I think most people aren't aware that this world pandemic is a game changer on all fronts, and right now it threatens not only our lives, literally, but also the way we conduct our lives, and as such, our priorities, our values, and the things at the very core of what defines us as a species, such as our physicality and the way we interact with each other and the world.

    This is no small matter, and no one is the wisest. One thing is for certain, we're all doing our best to survive and to make things that matter survive as well.

    We'll see if cinemas can survive this. I, for one, hope so, but this will no doubtably dilapidate the overall amount of infrastructures dedicated to it. Many cinemas will not survive. Hell, many people aren't surviving. Get real folks, pandemics are now a possibility, even when Covid gets contained. Our ways of living won't return to "normal", they'll be readjusted, adapted. The only certain thing now is uncertainty. And we must, and I can't stress this enough, we must support our fandoms, our favourite arts and artists, our fellow people who have their livelihood at risk right now. We shouldn't, we can't, in panic and ignorance, kick them when they're down or potentially at risk.

    They've been giving us joys for years and years, and now that they are at risk, we berate them like spoiled children. Let's not, please. Let's give them our support. They deserve our very best, as they always try to give us theirs.

    Univex out

  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,093
    Cheers @Univex
  • edited October 2020 Posts: 6,687
    Cheers @Univex

    No prob, @MakeshiftPython. I wholeheartedly agree with this you've just said: "Just accept the fact that movies are not going to come out until much later".

    And not only that, but we don't know how or where. But we should be behind their decisions, supporting them. Even if their reasoning is based on numbers, or people safety, or whatever, at the end of the day, they're only trying to survive as a business and way of living. And how could we not support that? Right?

    Oh, and btw, by support I also mean we should direct our governments attention to this. Arts are not to be made redundant by the economy based mind set that rules our systems and society.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,093
    Indeed.

    I just hope this method works out for them: https://deadline.com/2020/09/movie-theater-rescue-filmmakers-nato-mpa-dga-letter-to-congress-theaters-1234589055/

    If not enough movie goers can help save cinema, then perhaps this is the way.
  • edited October 2020 Posts: 6,687
    Indeed.

    I just hope this method works out for them: https://deadline.com/2020/09/movie-theater-rescue-filmmakers-nato-mpa-dga-letter-to-congress-theaters-1234589055/

    If not enough movie goers can help save cinema, then perhaps this is the way.

    We writers have been doing the same, to a certain degree. Well, I'm haven't been directly affected by all of this because I have multiple careers, but I'm along for the fight. As the publishing industry was put to an halt, many books were canceled. And many of my fellow writers depend on those to survive. So, again, we must urge our government to help. Same goes for the orchestras and choirs, dance companies, and many, many other artistic institutions.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    edited October 2020 Posts: 8,134
    Univex wrote: »
    Cinemas are one of many structures that are at risk right now. Talking about artistic venues and schedules, can you imagine how a dance company will cope, or a choir of large dimension, or an orchestra? Theatre, as our own Judi Dench has said, is facing a very opaque future. All of the performatic arts are. Everything that depends on a gathering of people is at risk of not existing anymore. And not because they'll have to wait it out. But because waiting it out means ceasing to exist.

    Right now, they're all trying their very best to keep their relevance and they're being resistant to a change that would potentially obliterate them and their means of living.

    I think most people aren't aware that this world pandemic is a game changer on all fronts, and right now it threatens not only our lives, literally, but also the way we conduct our lives, and as such, our priorities, our values, and the things at the very core of what defines us as a species, such as our physicality and the way we interact with each other and the world.

    This is no small matter, and no one is the wisest. One thing is for certain, we're all doing our best to survive and to make things that matter survive as well.

    We'll see if cinemas can survive this. I, for one, hope so, but this will no doubtably dilapidate the overall amount of infrastructures dedicated to it. Many cinemas will not survive. Hell, many people aren't surviving. Get real folks, pandemics are now a possibility, even when Covid gets contained. Our ways of living won't return to "normal", they'll be readjusted, adapted. The only certain thing now is uncertainty. And we must, and I can't stress this enough, we must support our fandoms, our favourite arts and artists, our fellow people who have their livelihood at risk right now. We shouldn't, we can't, in panic and ignorance, kick them when they're down or potentially at risk.

    They've been giving us joys for years and years, and now that they are at risk, we berate them like spoiled children. Let's not, please. Let's give them our support. They deserve our very best, as they always try to give us theirs.

    Univex out

    "Our man, here...."

    tenor.gif?itemid=4765508

    Nice work, @Univex
  • Posts: 6,687
    Go raibh maith agat, @CraigMooreOHMSS, my dear friend ;)
  • Posts: 1,394
    All of this "cowardly" talk is a very broad stroke dismissal of a very complicated situation, lads.
    Cowardly because they're potentially abandoning cinemas by depriving them of business (whether's that by further delays or dumping films onto VOD).

    Agreed.And remember,theaters dont get a cut of VOD sales like they do box office.This is exactly why the major cinema chains in the U.S were outraged when Universal put Trolls:World tour on VOD and when it made them a ton of money,said that this was the way forward.

    Now is as safe as its going to get to go to the cinema for quite a while.I work in a factory of over 500 people but our workplaces underwent a major overhaul to ensure social distancing and masks are worn wear this is not possible.Cinemas have done the same thing and the studios are literally cutting off their business by not releasing their big franchise films.
  • I understand the delay, though April may (again) be too optimistic. I sadly believe there will be at least one more delay. In the meantime, Eon or MGM (whoever) could extend a treat to Bond fans -- even for a price on streaming services -- showing an older Bond in silhouette (so it doesn't matter which "Bond incarnation it could be) sharing with someone (an old Felix, a colleague from MI-6, whoever) his thoughts on his career and past adventures. We could be treated to clips from all of the old movies (assignments, allies, enemies) maybe even re-edited a bit. This is something easily done in COVID-world and could be something really nice for fans.
  • Agreed.And remember,theaters dont get a cut of VOD sales like they do box office.This is exactly why the major cinema chains in the U.S were outraged when Universal put Trolls:World tour on VOD and when it made them a ton of money,said that this was the way forward.

    Now is as safe as its going to get to go to the cinema for quite a while.I work in a factory of over 500 people but our workplaces underwent a major overhaul to ensure social distancing and masks are worn wear this is not possible.Cinemas have done the same thing and the studios are literally cutting off their business by not releasing their big franchise films.
    I agree too, thank you AstonLotus. The reaction when Mulan was moved to Disney + is also relevant to this.
    I felt safe and comfortable when I went to Tenet. I'm looking forward to seeing The New Mutants this week too.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 8,134
    Again, chaps, how YOU feel has absolutely zero bearing on the reality of the situation. It's great that you felt safe and enjoyed it and I'm glad you got to do something you love (I envy you!), but it really doesn't matter at the moment.
  • Theaters are better off staying in hibernation at this point and getting bail out money from governments, rather than running theaters for only five people to show up in total to every screening.
    Very unlikely to come from the British government. Over here, they took months and months before they even gave any money to help out our theatre (plays and musicals) industry (with lots of very limiting regulations about rehearsals and performances included), let alone anything for cinemas.
  • jake24jake24 Sitting at your desk, kissing your lover, eating supper with your familyModerator
    edited October 2020 Posts: 10,588
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,093
    jake24 wrote: »

    Certainly explains a lot.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 8,134
    Okay, so just hypothetically.....

    Say No Time To Die was released in November, and we ended up with another Tenet scenario where under the circumstances the film did admirably but not well enough to recover its alleged costs or make it a worthwhile venture. That is the most likely scenario, one that satisfies an element of the public who just want the film but it actually doesn't really save anyone or anything. It gives it a good go, for sure, but cinemas are still in trouble.

    What then? Do we just keep pushing that narrative with each new film that was supposed to come along?
  • Posts: 1,394
    Okay, so just hypothetically.....

    Say No Time To Die was released in November, and we ended up with another Tenet scenario where under the circumstances the film did admirably but not well enough to recover its alleged costs or make it a worthwhile venture. That is the most likely scenario, one that satisfies an element of the public who just want the film but it actually doesn't really save anyone or anything. It gives it a good go, for sure, but cinemas are still in trouble.

    What then? Do we just keep pushing that narrative with each new film that was supposed to come along?

    I dont think anyone here thinks that any one film ( no matter how good or how popular ) can save cinema but its all about momentum.Tenet kicked it off and it should have been followed by Bond,Black Widow,Wonder Woman (etc).It would have got people going to cinemas again and while the studios would lose some money in the short term,they would in the long term save their own business.

    Widow moving to next year was a crippling blow and then the announcement of Bond moving is now seen as the final nail in the coffin.The irony is the studios who did this will not make as much money as they think they will next year cos a LOT of cinemas will be closing their doors permanently.

  • Posts: 3,164
    Okay, so just hypothetically.....

    Say No Time To Die was released in November, and we ended up with another Tenet scenario where under the circumstances the film did admirably but not well enough to recover its alleged costs or make it a worthwhile venture. That is the most likely scenario, one that satisfies an element of the public who just want the film but it actually doesn't really save anyone or anything. It gives it a good go, for sure, but cinemas are still in trouble.

    What then? Do we just keep pushing that narrative with each new film that was supposed to come along?

    That’s certainly what they’re hoping. Studios take the hit for the sake of feeding the cinema infrastructure and keep it ticking just for X amount of time.

  • I dont think anyone here thinks that any one film ( no matter how good or how popular ) can save cinema but its all about momentum.Tenet kicked it off and it should have been followed by Bond,Black Widow,Wonder Woman (etc).It would have got people going to cinemas again and while the studios would lose some money in the short term,they would in the long term save their own business.

    Widow moving to next year was a crippling blow and then the announcement of Bond moving is now seen as the final nail in the coffin.The irony is the studios who did this will not make as much money as they think they will next year cos a LOT of cinemas will be closing their doors permanently.
    I completely agree with you, AstonLotus. You've got a lot of common sense about the possible future of cinemas if things aren't corrected or sorted out soon compared to some others on this forum. All these studios are abandoning ship to 2021 and pretending that'll magically be better than this.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 8,134
    antovolk wrote: »
    Okay, so just hypothetically.....

    Say No Time To Die was released in November, and we ended up with another Tenet scenario where under the circumstances the film did admirably but not well enough to recover its alleged costs or make it a worthwhile venture. That is the most likely scenario, one that satisfies an element of the public who just want the film but it actually doesn't really save anyone or anything. It gives it a good go, for sure, but cinemas are still in trouble.

    What then? Do we just keep pushing that narrative with each new film that was supposed to come along?

    That’s certainly what they’re hoping. Studios take the hit for the sake of feeding the cinema infrastructure and keep it ticking just for X amount of time.


    Obviously the decision has been made now, but in your opinion @antovolk, was that ever viable?
  • DoctorKaufmannDoctorKaufmann Can shoot you from Stuttgart and still make it look like suicide.
    edited October 2020 Posts: 1,261
    It's cowardly because they're leaving cinemas out to dry.

    It's not cowardly. It's the pandemic. It would be irreponsible, plus people would be afriad of going to the movies. The only way to improve things would be to get a vaccine to control Covid19.
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