NO TIME TO DIE (2021) - Discuss Hans Zimmer's Score

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  • Jordo007Jordo007 Merseyside
    Posts: 2,510
    I hold what appears (unless I've missed something) to be a unique take, for as excellent as "Matera," "Final Ascent," and "Home" are, I think my favourite cue from the soundtrack is "Someone Was Here." That moment about 30 seconds in where the string melody begins has lived rent free in my head since my first viewing. Additionally, while it's not explicitly the purpose of the thread, the way it is used in the film is sublime, as Bond sails back to his bungalow after fishing. Those IMAX shots were truly something else.

    I completely understand this because I feel the exact same but with the track "Not What I Expected "
    The soundtrack is pretty good, I hope they release an expanded edition
  • astansillastansill London
    edited October 2021 Posts: 32
    I’d love to know how much of the soundtrack was Zimmer and how much was Mazzaro.
    On Steve Mazzaro’s website, he has a page which shows off some tracks from the soundtrack and the artist is ‘Steve Mazzaro’.
    Surely he couldn’t say it was purely him if it wasn’t?

    https://www.stevemazzaro.com/listen
  • MeanwhileMeanwhile Brooklyn
    Posts: 32
    I suspect Mazzaro composed all of those tracks, perhaps more. Let’s not forget how much of The Dark Knight Trilogy was Lorne Balfe.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,023
    My understanding is that Zimmer created the themes and Mazzaro adapted them for the score.

    There was a similar arrangement for SUPERMAN IV where John Williams couldn’t conduct the scoring himself because of tight scheduling, so he wrote four new themes and hired his regular orchestrator Alexander Courage to do scoring duties. So the film credits them like “Music by John Williams, Adapted and Conducted by Alexander Courage”.
  • mattjoesmattjoes Kicking: Impossible
    Posts: 6,719
    I hold what appears (unless I've missed something) to be a unique take, for as excellent as "Matera," "Final Ascent," and "Home" are, I think my favourite cue from the soundtrack is "Someone Was Here." That moment about 30 seconds in where the string melody begins has lived rent free in my head since my first viewing. Additionally, while it's not explicitly the purpose of the thread, the way it is used in the film is sublime, as Bond sails back to his bungalow after fishing. Those IMAX shots were truly something else.

    I can't explain it at the moment, but I feel the part you mention has a David Arnold vibe. This track is also one of my favorites, but it's the last 40 seconds that I really love. Great, energetic version of the Bond theme, which goes very well with the images of Bond driving, and being followed of course.
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 7,526
    Oh, RIGHT. The song title is referencing Bond finding the cigar butts in his place in Jamaica. I've been wondering for awhile now, when in the film this song takes place and what the title was referring to.
  • edited October 2021 Posts: 1,965
    I was not a fan of his score. He relied on too many parts of past scores and I felt didn't really created anything worthy of his own. Some of the action scenes he some good scores but I excepted way more from Zimmer.
  • Posts: 462
    Coming from my second viewing, one song that really stood out is the track that plays during Blofeld’s re-introduction - an absolute killer track. Very foreboding and menacing.
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 7,526
    CrzChris4 wrote: »
    Coming from my second viewing, one song that really stood out is the track that plays during Blofeld’s re-introduction - an absolute killer track. Very foreboding and menacing.

    Agreed. "Lovely to see you again" on the soundtrack; the first half is menacing for sure. Perfect for Blofeld.
  • Posts: 727
    He was too creatively drained from Dune.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,023
    CrzChris4 wrote: »
    Coming from my second viewing, one song that really stood out is the track that plays during Blofeld’s re-introduction - an absolute killer track. Very foreboding and menacing.

    The combination of that along with the machinery bringing him into the interrogation room was great. It actually helped Blofeld feel menacing as he slowly approached.
  • CrzChris4 wrote: »
    Coming from my second viewing, one song that really stood out is the track that plays during Blofeld’s re-introduction - an absolute killer track. Very foreboding and menacing.

    The combination of that along with the machinery bringing him into the interrogation room was great. It actually helped Blofeld feel menacing as he slowly approached.
    But it also doesn’t make sense to have him in that cage like he’s Hannibal Lector or something. Outside of running a criminal organization he was never shown to be any kind of threat physically. Just a spoiled brat with daddy issues. I suppose it’s because he was so underwhelming in SP that they decided to make him really menacing and scary in this one. Except there’s nothing to back that up. No reason for him to be caged like this. Like he’s a threat to the staff or something. Maybe it was to ensure that he doesn’t get broken out by his cohorts but the way it’s presented it’s like he’s this dangerous and psychopathic criminal. Except there’s nothing to base that on. Is it because he’s mumbling to himself in his cell? So it’s like... uh oh... he’s a psycho. Put him in a cage!
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,023
    That doesn’t really matter, I just loved the atmosphere of his appearance.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,534
    CrzChris4 wrote: »
    Coming from my second viewing, one song that really stood out is the track that plays during Blofeld’s re-introduction - an absolute killer track. Very foreboding and menacing.

    The combination of that along with the machinery bringing him into the interrogation room was great. It actually helped Blofeld feel menacing as he slowly approached.
    But it also doesn’t make sense to have him in that cage like he’s Hannibal Lector or something. Outside of running a criminal organization he was never shown to be any kind of threat physically. Just a spoiled brat with daddy issues. I suppose it’s because he was so underwhelming in SP that they decided to make him really menacing and scary in this one. Except there’s nothing to back that up. No reason for him to be caged like this. Like he’s a threat to the staff or something. Maybe it was to ensure that he doesn’t get broken out by his cohorts but the way it’s presented it’s like he’s this dangerous and psychopathic criminal. Except there’s nothing to base that on. Is it because he’s mumbling to himself in his cell? So it’s like... uh oh... he’s a psycho. Put him in a cage!

    I don't think the '007 narrative' requires a real-world logic all the time and in every (visual) detail. When we look at Ken Adam's amazing sets, we see uniqueness and creative genius, but also tons of impracticalities and engineering screw-ups. But that's fine, because when watching a Bond film, atmosphere is more important than whether or not such a design could actually prove useful in real life.

    Same with Blofeld's cell. It adds to the flavours of the scene, but doesn't make a lot of sense in real life, I suppose.
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    Posts: 3,985
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    CrzChris4 wrote: »
    Coming from my second viewing, one song that really stood out is the track that plays during Blofeld’s re-introduction - an absolute killer track. Very foreboding and menacing.

    The combination of that along with the machinery bringing him into the interrogation room was great. It actually helped Blofeld feel menacing as he slowly approached.
    But it also doesn’t make sense to have him in that cage like he’s Hannibal Lector or something. Outside of running a criminal organization he was never shown to be any kind of threat physically. Just a spoiled brat with daddy issues. I suppose it’s because he was so underwhelming in SP that they decided to make him really menacing and scary in this one. Except there’s nothing to back that up. No reason for him to be caged like this. Like he’s a threat to the staff or something. Maybe it was to ensure that he doesn’t get broken out by his cohorts but the way it’s presented it’s like he’s this dangerous and psychopathic criminal. Except there’s nothing to base that on. Is it because he’s mumbling to himself in his cell? So it’s like... uh oh... he’s a psycho. Put him in a cage!

    I don't think the '007 narrative' requires a real-world logic all the time and in every (visual) detail. When we look at Ken Adam's amazing sets, we see uniqueness and creative genius, but also tons of impracticalities and engineering screw-ups. But that's fine, because when watching a Bond film, atmosphere is more important than whether or not such a design could actually prove useful in real life.

    Same with Blofeld's cell. It adds to the flavours of the scene, but doesn't make a lot of sense in real life, I suppose.

    The sequence is very derivative of Silence Of The Lambs, as was Silva's silly perspex cell in SF.
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 7,526
    What was silly about the cell?
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    Posts: 3,985
    What was silly about the cell?

    I don't know, a perspex cell with 360 degree views in the middle of a room the size of an aircraft hanger...🤔
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 7,526
    Hah fair enough when you put it that way. Maybe MI6 consistently has several people that want to look at a prisoner at the same time? ;)
  • mattjoesmattjoes Kicking: Impossible
    Posts: 6,719
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    CrzChris4 wrote: »
    Coming from my second viewing, one song that really stood out is the track that plays during Blofeld’s re-introduction - an absolute killer track. Very foreboding and menacing.

    The combination of that along with the machinery bringing him into the interrogation room was great. It actually helped Blofeld feel menacing as he slowly approached.
    But it also doesn’t make sense to have him in that cage like he’s Hannibal Lector or something. Outside of running a criminal organization he was never shown to be any kind of threat physically. Just a spoiled brat with daddy issues. I suppose it’s because he was so underwhelming in SP that they decided to make him really menacing and scary in this one. Except there’s nothing to back that up. No reason for him to be caged like this. Like he’s a threat to the staff or something. Maybe it was to ensure that he doesn’t get broken out by his cohorts but the way it’s presented it’s like he’s this dangerous and psychopathic criminal. Except there’s nothing to base that on. Is it because he’s mumbling to himself in his cell? So it’s like... uh oh... he’s a psycho. Put him in a cage!

    I don't think the '007 narrative' requires a real-world logic all the time and in every (visual) detail. When we look at Ken Adam's amazing sets, we see uniqueness and creative genius, but also tons of impracticalities and engineering screw-ups. But that's fine, because when watching a Bond film, atmosphere is more important than whether or not such a design could actually prove useful in real life.

    Same with Blofeld's cell. It adds to the flavours of the scene, but doesn't make a lot of sense in real life, I suppose.
    I fully agree. This is a hallmark of the Bond films; it's part of creating a heightened reality.

    CrzChris4 wrote: »
    Coming from my second viewing, one song that really stood out is the track that plays during Blofeld’s re-introduction - an absolute killer track. Very foreboding and menacing.

    The combination of that along with the machinery bringing him into the interrogation room was great. It actually helped Blofeld feel menacing as he slowly approached.
    I agree, it was a terrific moment.
  • MeanwhileMeanwhile Brooklyn
    Posts: 32
    I will say, in the unreleased cue where Blofeld’s cell is rolling out, there’s a choir that comes in with the beat that reminds me of “The Shining” which I loooovvvee. Given how Cary reveres Kubrick much like Mendes does, it’s an easy reference to spot and very effective in the film.
  • Fire_and_Ice_ReturnsFire_and_Ice_Returns I am trying to get away from this mountan!
    edited October 2021 Posts: 23,284
    Evening off, having a few drinks and put the NTTD score on... again lol

    The last score I listened to as much as this on initial release was QoS.
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded the Ballrooms of Mars
    Posts: 12,459
  • Posts: 1,314
    Was a little ambivalent at first but I’ve given the score a good listen and I think by and large it’s great. Quite creatively weaves the vamp and parts of the theme throughout.
  • mattjoesmattjoes Kicking: Impossible
    Posts: 6,719
    For me, the best one since QoS. At least.
  • peterpeter Toronto
    edited October 2021 Posts: 8,487
    A beautiful and exciting soundtrack that matches the sumptuous imagery on screen... I'm absolutely no expert on music.... so whatever I say is from a place of innocence... I feel Zimmer and company were very careful to give us tracks that were a respectful mix of the Bond "sound" over the previous four films (as well as callbacks to Barry (both subtle and not so subtle, which I LOVED)), as well as giving us some of his own unique sounds (I loved that thumping Bond theme he used in Matera, Cuba and in Safin's lair).

    I loved the balance that Zimmer struck since I am a fan of the soundtracks from the first three Craig- Bond films and he magically wove all of this in, and then some. Just magical.

  • goldenswissroyalegoldenswissroyale Switzerland
    edited October 2021 Posts: 4,392
    I've listened to it a lot the recent weeks. Listening the soundtrack gives me the possibility to jump back in the cinema and I try to see the fitting images to the sound. It is a good soundtrack but I'm not sure how much it is due to the fact that it is a new Bond movie which is sticking in my brain for a while. There wasn't a moment where I didn't like the soundtrack (maybe apart from the Armstromg track in the end titles...) but at the same time it doesn't have an unique style like Barry was able to do: his soundtracks created an atmosphere which was perfect for the specific movies. Zimmer is a pro but it doesn't sound bondian sometimes. Nevertheless, I'm very happy that Zimmer created the emotional track for the ending.
  • AceHoleAceHole Belgium, via Britain
    Posts: 1,727
    mattjoes wrote: »
    For me, the best one since QoS. At least.

    Agreed.
    Although there is not much in the way of ‘new’ thematic material I feel this is the first soundtrack since QoS that ADDS to the visual experience, instead of the music just sort of being there in the background, along for the ride, so to speak…
  • Posts: 820
    peter wrote: »
    A beautiful and exciting soundtrack that matches the sumptuous imagery on screen... I'm absolutely no expert on music.... so whatever I say is from a place of innocence... I feel Zimmer and company were very careful to give us tracks that were a respectful mix of the Bond "sound" over the previous four films (as well as callbacks to Barry (both subtle and not so subtle, which I LOVED)), as well as giving us some of his own unique sounds (I loved that thumping Bond theme he used in Matera, Cuba and in Safin's lair).

    I loved the balance that Zimmer struck since I am a fan of the soundtracks from the first three Craig- Bond films and he magically wove all of this in, and then some. Just magical.

    Bang on. 100% agree, @peter!
  • Aziz_FekkeshAziz_Fekkesh Royale-les-Eaux
    Posts: 403
    Fine score, even very good, though Zimmer has a tendency to recycle his own material ala James Horner and many cues had that unmistakable "Hans Zimmer sound" that I've come to associate with TDK trilogy, The Thin Red Line, etc.
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    Posts: 3,985
    Fine score, even very good, though Zimmer has a tendency to recycle his own material ala James Horner and many cues had that unmistakable "Hans Zimmer sound" that I've come to associate with TDK trilogy, The Thin Red Line, etc.

    I was also thinking about James Horner the other day with regards to the NTTD score. Like a lot of Horner's work (and I do love his music scores) Zimmer's score does have that 'recycled' sound.
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