'This is MY Bond film' : which film means the most to YOU and why .

barryt007barryt007 Kicking Kara 'brain dead' Milovy off the top of a Ferris Wheel in Vienna
in Bond Movies Posts: 10,615
For me,it will always be OP..i saw it in 1983 in Bournemouth.

I had seen Bond before but this was the cinema and wow,it blew me away...its #6 in my rankings ,but will always be the Bond film close to my heart.

How about you lot ?
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Comments

  • edited March 11 Posts: 10,473
    Mine's GE. Saw it on VHS back in early 1996 and watched it on a virtually daily basis for 20 years.

    I can do a one-man re-enactment of the film in my sleep.

    It may not have aged particularly well in places but its still one I enjoy.
  • barryt007barryt007 Kicking Kara 'brain dead' Milovy off the top of a Ferris Wheel in Vienna
    Posts: 10,615
    Thats a pretty good film to introduce you to Bond..i saw it at the cinema and wow !!
  • edited March 11 Posts: 10,473
    I hate seeing people saying its a dire film but it's something I have to tolerate.

    I'd love to have know certain people on here when I was younger. I'd torture them with repeating dialogue and watching the film in their presence.

    Oh yeah...and the N64 game too.

    Put it this way, watching a few minutes of GF* a couple of years before failed to make me a fan.

    *a film I now think is great but it wasn't the one that started my interest in Bond.
  • barryt007barryt007 Kicking Kara 'brain dead' Milovy off the top of a Ferris Wheel in Vienna
    Posts: 10,615
    BAIN123 wrote: »
    I hate seeing people saying its a dire film but it's something I have to tolerate.

    I'd love to have know certain people on here when I was younger. I'd torture them with repeating dialogue and watching the film in their presence.

    Oh yeah...and the N64 game too.

    Put it this way, watching a few minutes of GF* a couple of years before failed to make me a fan.

    *a film I now think is great but it didn't start my interest in Bond.

    It still doesnt make me a fan now ,apart from the golf scene .
  • Posts: 10,473
    I know you aren't a fan of GF Barry.
  • BirdlesonBirdleson San Jose, CA
    Posts: 18,596
    GF, my first movie memory. Those images never left my mind. Drive-in, around '65. I was 3.
  • Posts: 10,473
    My first Bond memory?? Tough one.

    I do vaguely remember seeing Sean squash the tarantula and jumping off a castle wall on a horse.
  • Mendes4LyfeMendes4Lyfe GOTHAM IS YOURS!
    Posts: 4,986
    Dr No.
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 1,097
    GoldenEye for me as well; similar story to @BAIN123, my dad and I rented it from Blockbuster on VHS when I was really young, and we never returned it ;)
    Although I haven't watched it since then as much as BAIN evidently has, I've still seen it countless times.
  • edited March 11 Posts: 10,473
    for a long time I thought it was a perfect Bond film. It's only as I've got older and time has gone by that the cracks have shown more.

    I suppose if its a favourite then there's no where for it to go but down.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 26,690
    It's a toss up of a few for me.

    GF was the first time I think I watched a Bond film and really watched it to consume it, but that's not a special memory to me in comparison to others. I have vivid flashes of racing into stores looking for any Bond movies they had after I saw GF and realized this character was one I needed in my life, and after seeing the '64 feature I had a personal mission to get all of Connery's and watch them before anything else, posthaste. I found some nice special editions that came with booklets for DN and TB at my closest Wal-Mart, and I can still clearly picture those cool little books in my head page for page.

    After I got the DVDs for Connery's films I was so excited to rip them open immediately afterward that I remained in the car while my parents went shopping elsewhere. It was a special time when I was taking my first steps into the cinematic legacy of Bond, leafing through the minute factoids and behind-the-scenes articles on DN and TB at a time when those details were not so heartily committed to my memory, as if in an encyclopedia. Those moments of discovery, and the journey to watch Sean's movies for the first time are far and away why I'm here and why I remain such a passionate ambassador of Bond. I'd love to go back to that time for just one moment and wipe my memory away to experience all of them again, as if for the first time. I'm always jealous of people who haven't yet seen the 60s films for that reason, because my shock at them being ignorant of Connery's adventures is overwhelmed by the envy I feel for someone who is just about to begin an unforgettable cinematic journey.

    CR is also another film that has an obvious measure of importance to me right up there with how I feel about DN, FRWL, GF and TB. It was those movies specifically that changed my life, corny as it is to say, because the first summer I became committed to knowing everything I could about Bond I watched them all ad nauseam, picking up everything they had to show and teach me on constant repeat. I watched CR on DVD and on TV a ton, in latter cases when a channel was doing a marathon of the Bond films and that film was on six nights in a row at a specific time, and I caught each broadcast. I was drowning in Bond, and loving every minute of it.

    There's also Bond films that may not be my absolute favorites, or that I attach strong memories to, but that I tip my hat at with amazing reverence nonetheless. When I first watched the Moore films I had a hard time taking the changes in tone seriously, yet I was instantly overwhelmed by the character of Gogol and how EON took a brave approach mid-Cold War to actually show major world powers working together. This bravery continued even in the Dalton era with Pushkin, and again they won my respect. One of the things that really makes me push for Bond as art, and for these films to be considered as truly valuable and important beyond the mere entertainment they can give us, is because of things like that. In a cinematic age not far removed from the war propaganda of the 40s and 50s where it was easy to be fed anti-communist anything, the Bond films never once made the Soviets the enemies, and at every chance they got, the writers crafted well-framed and executed moments of detente between Bond, the Americans and the Russians, showing that even in a time of unrest compromise and unity under the right circumstances was viable when the world needed it most.

    And that's part of why these films are so special to me, as a collection. Yes, there's beautiful women, cool cars and nicely tailored suits, but the films, even at their most silly, contain important and brave messages for those willing to see past all the flash. These messages can be found in every era of movies for each actor, and that makes me very proud to be a fan, and proud of EON every step of the way for being willing to argue for the kind of unity and understanding as presented in the above films, as well as by crafting other important stories with messages fighting for forgiveness, courage under fire, sacrifice and an altogether form of global patriotism where Bond's fight feels like your own, and all the world's too. He's never been fighting for just himself or Britain, he stands for all of us.

    When I overhear people ragging on Bond or diluting the importance of the films to two hours of switch-the-brain-off entertainment with no substance, I think to myself, "You don't know these films like I do, and I feel sorry for you."

    So in short, all 24 films and all 6 actors are special, as each era contributed to what we needed as a species at the time the films were made, and each paved the way for everything that came after them, as their predecessors did before them.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!
    Posts: 13,812
    GE

    I was the right age when it came out (13) and since it was the first Bond film in 6 years, it was also the first time I got really hyped up for a new film release. I collected every related article in the newspapers and magazines, bought the soundtrack with my hard earned allowance. When GE was released on VHS, I spent nearly two weeks watching and rewatching the film, driving my parents insane. To this day, I consider GE the best of the Brosnan films. This level of worshipping wouldn't be repeated until 2006...
  • edited March 11 Posts: 10,473
    I admit to being more than slightly obsessed with that film as a teenager.
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    GE

    When GE was released on VHS, I spent nearly two weeks watching and rewatching the film, driving my parents insane.

    Only two weeks? ;)

    The film was also educational as it taught me about the Lienz Cossack story and introduced me to Stand by Your Man.
  • Mendes4LyfeMendes4Lyfe GOTHAM IS YOURS!
    edited March 11 Posts: 4,986
    I'm still obsessed with GE. Watch it more than any other for the pure Campbell. It's like overdosing on Campbell. However, Dr No is still my all time high!
  • edited March 11 Posts: 1,864
    Great idea for a topic, @barryt007.

    I suppose I could pick a handful of the Bonds for this one, but I'll narrow it down to two:

    OCTOPUSSY
    That summer of '83 provided an ABC airing of DR. NO, which, although I had previously only a passing interesting in the Bonds, got me hooked and excited to see the latest entry: OP. After witnessing a massive line for the 13th Bond film, my folks decided we'd catch a matinee the next day. The film didn't disappoint, but at the time wasn't exactly my favorite. Fast forward 2 years. My Dad had always been in a band back then and had a gig at some party of one of his co-workers. The host took me out to the nearest video store to rent a Bond film as we would be at that party for hours. GF was my choice, however unavailable so we settled on OP.
    I watched it twice that afternoon while everyone was partying, eating, etc. My first experience with the then novel concept of a VCR, so I rewound several scenes over and over again. OP grew on me.
    A few months later my folks purchased our first VHS player and then next day found a used copy of OP for $20. Needless to say I watched that CBS/Fox Home Video edition multiple times, and pretty much new the film inside and out. On the weekends we would rent the other Bonds, and the first one we rented I felt I owed it to myself to see: GOLDFINGER.
    The ABC Sunday Night At The Movies airings of GF back then always cut the entire PTS, along with other scenes and moments. So getting to see an un-cut edition was a treat back then. I loved every frame, and would often compare it to OP, which to me, seemed heavily influenced by GF. The crushing of the dice echoed Oddjob's golf-ball crush, the bomb at the climax ticking down to the last moments, the PTS being unrelated to the main plot, both had white dinner jackets, and Bond only sporting the black dinner jacket during a dining sequence and so on. I even noted that Bond's shoes in both films featured rather slick soles. How does 007 fight on the roof of a train in those slip ons without falling on his arse? In GF he's running around in the forest in business shoes as well. Well if it's good enough for Bond it was good enough for me, so my folks ended up getting me a pair of boots that also had similar soles. I would run around the neighborhood (then an industrial area filled with warehouses and factories) pretending to be Bond. When wearing my dark polo and back-pack I was Sean in GF. When wearing my bright red shirt I was Roger in OP. Most of our neighbors knew what I was doing and humored me. Fun time to be a kid, especially since new Bond movies were coming out on a regular basis.
    Very special time in my childhood, that year: watching our copy of OP every couple weeks or so, renting the Bonds on the weekends. I do have special memories of some of the others, namely DR NO and DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER
    during that period, but GF and OP sealed the deal for me.
  • BMW_with_missilesBMW_with_missiles Reminder: Unsafe driving will void warranty!
    edited March 12 Posts: 1,674
    TND

    The first Bond film I ever saw was CR, and while I did, and still do enjoy the movie, it left me thinking, "Where are the gadgets and over the top fun I was promised?"

    The second Bond film I saw was TND. About 5 minutes in I was thinking, "Oh Hell yeah!"
  • Last_Rat_StandingLast_Rat_Standing South Florida
    Posts: 1,715
    GoldenEye.

    November of 99. Had been playing the game for about a year before I saw the film.
  • JamesBondKenyaJamesBondKenya God I love Quantum of Solace
    Posts: 1,120
    Great idea for a thread
    My first bond film in theatres was CR when I was 4 but I can't remember that, the first one I removed was being 6 and watching qos and that film will always have a special place in bond for me.
  • bondjamesbondjames Some men are coming to kill us. We're going to kill them first.
    edited March 12 Posts: 17,203
    For me it must be TMWTGG.

    I can't remember when I first watched it, but it was on tv in London when I must have been about 7 or 8. I was hooked on Bond forever after this.

    I loved the brassy score, Lulu's cracker of a song, Moore as Mr. Unflappable cool as a cucumber James Bond, diminutive & mischievous NicNac, $m a shot hitman Scaramanga (I knew Lee was Dracula and was terrified of him), sexy & demure Andrea & ditzy Goodnight.

    I was enamoured with all the stunts and fights, the martial arts training camp, the car chase and slide whistle, JW Pepper & his wife, the bratty Thai kid, the kickboxing & duel at the end. A few years later I visited Thailand with my parents and was so excited to be at the Khlong Lat Mayom Floating Market (where the boat chase was filmed). I just love the authentic exotic atmosphere that this film has & its eccentric & quirky nature.

    My enjoyment has not diminished one bit after all these years, & although I recognize it's not one of the best it will always have a special place in my heart.

    Coincidentally, I happen to be watching it right now as I type this and am having a blast!
  • BirdlesonBirdleson San Jose, CA
    Posts: 18,596
    bondjames wrote: »
    For me it must be TMWTGG.

    I can't remember when I first watched it, but it was on tv in London when I must have been about 7 or 8. I was hooked on Bond forever after this.

    I loved the brassy score, Lulu's cracker of a song, Moore as Mr. Unflappable cool as a cucumber James Bond, diminutive & mischievous NicNac, $m a shot hitman Scaramanga (I knew Lee was Dracula and was terrified of him), sexy & demure Andrea & ditzy Goodnight.

    I was enamoured with all the stunts and fights, the martial arts training camp, the car chase and slide whistle, JW Pepper & his wife, the bratty Thai kid, the kickboxing & duel at the end. A few years later I visited Thailand with my parents and was so excited to be at the Khlong Lat Mayom Floating Market (where the boat chase was filmed). I just love the authentic exotic atmosphere that this film has & its eccentric & quirky nature.

    My enjoyment has not diminished one bit after all these years, & although I recognize it's not one of the best it will always have a special place in my heart.

    Coincidentally, I happen to be watching it right now as I type this and am having a blast!

    Great choice. After I first saw it in the theatre when I was 12, that was my favorite for years. I still love it.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 26,690
    Great idea for a thread
    My first bond film in theatres was CR when I was 4 but I can't remember that, the first one I removed was being 6 and watching qos and that film will always have a special place in bond for me.

    Christ you're making me feel old, and I'm only 23.
  • Major_BoothroydMajor_Boothroyd Republic of Isthmus
    Posts: 1,280
    There are two that leap to mind.

    From Russia With Love and The Living Daylights.

    TLD was my introductory Bond. I was so excited to see it. I was swept up in the 25th Anniversary celebrations of Bond. I had never seen a Bond film and I saw 'Happy Anniversary 007' on TV. It was a revelation. I must have watched that 100 times on VHS before The Living Daylights was released. Dalton was a throwback to the Fleming Bond and around this time I read the Fleming novels - in movie release order. It was obviously pre-Internet days - so I didn't know the order of the books but I did know the order of the movies thanks to Sally Hibbin's awesome 'Official James Bond 007 Movie Book'. So I read Dr No and From Russia With Love and the latter very quickly became my favourite Bond novels so it's no surprise that From Russia With Love is the film that means the most to me. It has everything I love in a bond film and in a bond novel. Both are intriguingly structured, have glamour, Cold War espionage, romance, a charming ally, top class villains and a sinister edge to all the proceedings culminating in the confrontation with Red Grant. Connery is absolutely flawless in this film. I love the soundtrack too and listen to it often (my vinyl copy is among my treasured posessions) I find FRWL endlessly rewatchable and it's the film I feel closest to. TLD and FRWL are the twin Bond films responsible for getting me into the greatest film series of all time.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 26,690
    @Major_Boothroyd, FRWL is one of the films I'd save first if a burning building had the last copies of the films inside, if not the first.

    It makes sense that you love TLD too, as it and FRWL are essentially sister films where the former often recalls the latter.
  • MurdockMurdock Mr. 1000
    Posts: 14,233
    GoldenEye. My earliest and fondest memories stem with my experiences with GoldenEye. I was first exposed to GoldenEye through the N64 game. It was like the second or third game I had. I was 6 years old and my dad had rented the movie. I had no idea it was a movie. I just knew it as a great fun to play game. When I saw the film finally, My life was changed forever.

    Serra's music for the Gunbarrel was the coolest thing I ever heard at that time in my life. I like electronic music so that was right up my alley. I had no preconceived notions of what Bond music should sound like at that time so this new experience was a treat for me. From beginning to end GoldenEye is the ultimate treat for me. Not only is it my favorite Bond movie but it's my late father's favorite Bond movie as well. It brought us very close together. I will cherish the film and those memories always. When I say it's a masterpiece, It's not hyperbole. For me, It's the be all, end all Bond film.
  • mattjoesmattjoes Where the Brosnan does shine
    Posts: 545
    Mine is Octopussy, partly because when I was 12 or so, I was about to finish watching For Your Eyes Only on VHS for the first time, and I was expecting the "James Bond will return" text to mention A View to a Kill, which I'd already seen. Turns out that didn't happen, to my delight and surprise. My dad rented these movies for me, and he mistakenly thought that FYEO was the last one left for me to watch, and had told me so. I thought I'd covered the complete Moore saga, but I was wrong! Can you imagine what I'd be like to discover a lost Bond film? I guess that's kind of what I felt. Well, I didn't have access to much information on film in those days.

    Anyway, my dad then rented Octopussy for me. I watched it, I loved it. Great fun.
  • edited March 12 Posts: 1,646
    DELETE
  • edited March 12 Posts: 1,646
    Has to be OHMSS for me, especially as it was my first cinematic Bond experience. I remember everything about it, right down to the accompanying documentary short "Above it All" that played before the movie. Some might call this documentary a spoiler, considering it showed scenes of the proceeding main feature, but for a young boy unfamiliar with 007 it only whet my appetite for the main dish that was to follow.

    I can't recall whether I had the Dinky tie-in toys before or after seeing the movie, probably before as OHMSS was released just after Christmas. I do remember buying the Anglo bubblegum cards afterwards, which looked like this if you haven't seen them before...

    OHMSS01.jpg

    My father was a Fleet Street journalist at the time and also managed to get hold of the OHMSS press pack, which I still have to this day buried away in my collector boxes in the loft.

    My recollections of the movie was a hugely packed cinema, far bigger than the DAF one, which I was to see a few years later. But, boy oh boy, do I remember that first moment when those white dots on a black background slid across the screen, to then stop halfway to reveal the "Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli present" credit line; followed by Lazenby walking across the screen, turning then falling onto his knees, before shooting the screen blood red. Another thing that stood out to me, apart from the action, was the musical score. Hearing this in full stereo in a cinema for the very first time was the moment I fell in love with John Barry. After seeing this I nagged my dad for the soundtrack, which he eventually bought for me, and I've been a Barry fan ever since, pretty much buying anything and everything of Barry on vinyl.

    Of course, after seeing Lazenby's Bond, I got to see all the previous Connery Bonds in double bill reruns at the cinema over the course of the following year, just before DAF came out. But it was OHMSS that first got me hooked, hence why it's My Bond movie.
  • BennyBenny And I'm wearing a red shirt !
    Posts: 6,673
    Some really great stories in here already. All of them with such genuine sentiment and appreciation. It's clear that these films really do mean that much to you all.
    I've shared this story before, but I'll do it again.
    The Spy Who Loved Me and Octopussy
    The first Bond film I recall seeing in its entirety was The Spy Who Loved Me, in the Christmas of 1982. It was the major event movie of that year, and our family had recently got our first VCR. I taped this film, and watched it over and over again. For a seven year old, it was truly amazing. The ski jump off the cliff, the gadgets, the music, the car that went underwater, the massive villain with metal teeth. A supertanker that swallows submarines...It was exotic, exciting and for someone who knew nothing of the series before this, a perfect way to enter the world of James Bond. At the time the only way to watch Bond films, was when they were on TV. Easter, public holidays and Christmas. Needless to say, my introduction to Bond was rather slow at first. My parents would rent other Bond films for me from our local video store. But even they were scarce. Certainly not all the films were available. I do recall seeing From Russia With Love and You Only Live Twice. They were ok. But I was a kid. Roger Moore was my Bond. Not this Scots fellow, in these old films. Besides, they weren't as action packed as TSWLM was. (Little did I know at the time)
    Then in the summer of 1983, my dad took me to the cinema to see the latest Bond film, Octopussy. This was in a time when, if you weren't a regular movie goer. Then you didn't see trailers for upcoming movies. So I had no idea what to expect.
    The film began and it was like a shot of adrenalin for me. Another spectacular pre titles sequence, with a micro jet. Tense and exciting scenes with OO9 being chased in the forest. The Sotheby's auction. Then the usual exotic locations that had appealed to my in TSWLM. India looked glamourous. The back gammon game stood out. And I even enjoyed the Tuk-Tuk chase. I was still 7 going on 8 at the time. To see this on the big screen was a monumental experience. The action and excitement just grew and grew. Bond is captured, escapes, learns of a plot to set off a bomb. Goes to Germany to save the day, has a terrific action sequence on the train, gets the villains and saves the day. And then I got the finale as well!
    I couldn't believe there was James Bond chasing a plane on a horse, then leaping on the plane and hanging on for dear life. At the time it was an amazing scene. And to be honest, it still is.
    If The Spy Who Loved Me had got me interested in James Bond. Then Octopussy cemented that interest for ever more.
    After that, it was a case of waiting for the VHS copy to come out. Which took anywhere from six months to a year after release. Youngsters now a days have no idea how easy they have it. When my parents could rent me a copy of OP, it was one that I picked on a pretty much weekly basis. I watched it over and over. Never getting bored of the thrills that it gave me. And still does. It was the film that made me a Bond fan, and a fan of film in general. I love this film, and despite slipping slightly down my rankings, it'll always be my number 1. I recently caught up with some friends whom I hadn't had much contact with for about fifteen years. One of the questions they asked me, was 'are you still into James Bond?' It's a question I'm frequently asked by friends and family. And one I'm more than proud to say, Yes. I am.
  • Agent_99Agent_99 Enjoys a spirited ride as much as the next girl
    Posts: 794
    Benny wrote: »
    I recently caught up with some friends whom I hadn't had much contact with for about fifteen years. One of the questions they asked me, was 'are you still into James Bond?' It's a question I'm frequently asked by friends and family. And one I'm more than proud to say, Yes. I am.

    Ha! I get this from people I was at school with. Ditto.
  • Agent_99Agent_99 Enjoys a spirited ride as much as the next girl
    Posts: 794
    Like many of you, GE was the first Bond film I got to see in the cinema; I wrote in the Advent Calendar about what a great time that was for me, and how irrevocably tied to being 18 and going away to university. (And, like @DarthDimi, I had - still have - so many press cuttings).

    I also have a huge soft spot for TSWLM, the Bond film from, ahem, the year I was born. (Planning to screen it for my Significant Birthday in September.)

    However, I can't not give this to The Living Daylights.

    I first saw it on TV in the early '90s, ensconced in the TV room at my boarding-school with a likeminded friend. At this point I'd been hitting the books and movies pretty heavily for a year or so. I'd enjoyed all the films, especially OHMSS, but I knew straight away that this was the tops and that Timothy Dalton was MY BOND. And so it has remained ever since.

    I am opinionated passionate enough on the subject that most of my friends could name it as my favourite (and wind me up about it, because that's what friends are for). If there's merchandise on offer and I have limited funds, it's the TLD watch/mug/toy car I'll buy first. What do I get ridiculously thrilled about seeing at a Bond car exhibition filled with expensive, exciting hardware? The cello case.

    It's the one Bond film of which I will brook no criticism; the one I find myself defending to strangers at parties, and then suddenly realise that everyone else has gone quiet and it's just me shouting and shaking my fist. Again.

    I regret nothing.
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