Which Bond film is the most intellectually and/or emotionally engaging?

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  • Posts: 1,296
    General Gogol reminds me of myself in his peaceful and friendly manor. But I am glad Pushkin got to play his KGB violin for us, good actor and I might eben like him better than Gogol.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    Gogol and Tanner have both featured in seven films now, FYEO is the one film to feature both.
  • DaltonCraig007DaltonCraig007 They say, "Evil prevails when good men fail to act." What they ought to say is, "Evil prevails."
    edited September 2016 Posts: 15,689
    About the discussion a few pages back on what Bond would watch on his big TV, it reminds me of an early episode of 'Person of Interest' when Finch and Reese went to the cinema to watch 'Seven Samurai', with Reese saying he would have preferred 'Once Upon A Time in the West' as 'there would be less subtitles'. I could see Craig Bond in such scene, I'm sure @ClarkDevlin would agree.
  • ClarkDevlinClarkDevlin Martinis, Girls and Guns
    Posts: 15,423
    Indeed, @DaltonCraig007. I'd like to think that John Reese himself shares fair amount of personality traits with Craig's Bond. So yes.
  • Posts: 4,325
    Die Another Day
  • Posts: 11,189
    tanaka123 wrote: »
    Die Another Day

    As in it leaves you emotionally devastated? ;)

  • DaltonCraig007DaltonCraig007 They say, "Evil prevails when good men fail to act." What they ought to say is, "Evil prevails."
    edited September 2016 Posts: 15,689
    Technically the two most emotional films for me are GE and CR, both being the first ever Bond film I saw (GE) and my first Bond on the big screen (CR). It's been 15 years since I discovered GE and 10 years since CR, I still get extremely excited by the GE's gunbarrel and the PTS of CR, despite having seen both films god-knows how many times. I still remember the very first time I saw both, and I will be remembering these 2 experiences 40 years from now.
  • Posts: 4,325
    BAIN123 wrote: »
    tanaka123 wrote: »
    Die Another Day

    As in it leaves you emotionally devastated? ;)

    Yes, I was almost on the brink of demagnetising all my Bond VHS tapes, using my Bond DVDs as coasters, growing my hair and living on an island to a place where no footage of Die Another Day could reach me - fortunately I was cured - Casino Royale was made.
  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 on fb and ajb
    Posts: 9,020
    Technically the two most emotional films for me are GE and CR, both being the first ever Bond film I saw (GE) and my first Bond on the big screen (CR). It's been 15 years since I discovered GE and 10 years since CR, I still get extremely excited by the GE's gunbarrel and the PTS of CR, despite having seen both films god-knows how many times. I still remember the very first time I saw both, and I will be remembering these 2 experiences 40 years from now.

    The first Bond movie on TV is like wanking for the first time, first Bond at the cinema is like having sex the first time.
    Both unforgettable moments in any man's life.
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    edited September 2016 Posts: 3,985
    Technically the two most emotional films for me are GE and CR, both being the first ever Bond film I saw (GE) and my first Bond on the big screen (CR). It's been 15 years since I discovered GE and 10 years since CR, I still get extremely excited by the GE's gunbarrel and the PTS of CR, despite having seen both films god-knows how many times. I still remember the very first time I saw both, and I will be remembering these 2 experiences 40 years from now.

    The first Bond movie on TV is like wanking for the first time, first Bond at the cinema is like having sex the first time.
    Both unforgettable moments in any man's life.

    I think the purpose of the thread is in relation to the content of the film being 'intellectually or emotionally engaging' not how emotional the experience was.
  • DaltonCraig007DaltonCraig007 They say, "Evil prevails when good men fail to act." What they ought to say is, "Evil prevails."
    edited September 2016 Posts: 15,689
    I think the purpose of the thread is in relation to the content of the film being 'intellectually or emotionally engaging' not how emotional the film made you feel

    In that case, none of them. I watch ''The Pianist', 'Zodiac' or 'Schindler's List' to get intellectually/emotionally engaging films. I watch Bond films, and other blockbusters like Indiana Jones, Star Wars and what-not to have a big dose of fun for 2 hours.

  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 on fb and ajb
    Posts: 9,020
    I think the purpose of the thread is in relation to the content of the film being 'intellectually or emotionally engaging' not how emotional the film made you feel

    In that case, none of them. I watch ''The Pianist', 'Zodiac' or 'Schindler's List' to get intellectually/emotionally engaging films. I watch Bond films, and other blockbusters like Indiana Jones, Star Wars and what-not to have a big dose of fun for 2 hours.

    +1

    or spot-on to use the old-fashioned term.
  • Posts: 4,599
    Watching a Bond movie and feeling no emotion? really?
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited September 2016 Posts: 23,883
    I think the purpose of the thread is in relation to the content of the film being 'intellectually or emotionally engaging' not how emotional the film made you feel

    In that case, none of them. I watch ''The Pianist', 'Zodiac' or 'Schindler's List' to get intellectually/emotionally engaging films. I watch Bond films, and other blockbusters like Indiana Jones, Star Wars and what-not to have a big dose of fun for 2 hours.

    +1or spot-on to use the old-fashioned term.
    Yes, I agree as well. I was emotionally moved after both TDK & TDKR though. I understood their message and related to the characterizations & story arc more.
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    edited September 2016 Posts: 3,985
    I think the purpose of the thread is in relation to the content of the film being 'intellectually or emotionally engaging' not how emotional the film made you feel

    In that case, none of them. I watch ''The Pianist', 'Zodiac' or 'Schindler's List' to get intellectually/emotionally engaging films. I watch Bond films, and other blockbusters like Indiana Jones, Star Wars and what-not to have a big dose of fun for 2 hours.

    Fair point but I'd say that some of the Bonds aren't just a 'big dose of fun' for two hours thankfully. Which was the posters original intention.

    I'd say that CR, QoS, SF, FRWL, OHMSS and TLD have at least some intellectual and emotional content and are not just 'switch off and enjoy' action films.
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    Posts: 6,774
    Agreed. If I want to be intellectually engaged I surely turn to the European masters of cinema like Michelangelo Antonioni or Ingmar Bergman.

    Though I think there are a few Bond films that can engage one emotionally. I'd say FRWL, OHMSS, TLD and CR are the obvious ones as they all feature a realistic romance.

    I'd also include LTK and QOS here because of their revenge driven plots. Maybe also GE for featuring an old friend as the main antagonist.

  • QOS makes me a feel a headache sometimes, I don't know if that counts.
  • GBFGBF
    Posts: 3,195
    QOS makes me a feel a headache sometimes, I don't know if that counts.

    Maybe a headache is also an emotion :-)

    I mean every Bond film causes emotions. Enjoyment or disappointment are also emotions.
  • edited October 2016 Posts: 1
    Well, short answer: Skyfall. I have been a hardcore Bond fan all my life, loved Connery's movies, grew up with Moore's Bond, and had fun with Dalton and Brosnan. But, to be completely honest, Skyfall is the best Bond film ever! Spectre was completely far fetched, forced, and even though it was good entertainment, it was, well... But it got me the feeling of full circle. With Skyfall i think they should just have ended, i don't know if this ongoing franchise is good for the character. And Spectre was a missed opportunity, good characters awfully explored. And at the end i got the sense that this was closure. But nooo! They will continue to milk the dead cow. It is all about money, and i don't know if Fleming would approve of this. It pains me to say this, but Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation was way better than Spectre. With the possible exception of that amazing snow chase. Anyway, my two cents.
  • SeanCraigSeanCraig Germany
    edited October 2016 Posts: 732
    The character created by Fleming has more to offer than the popcorn entertainment version most of the movies showed. While there is nothing wrong with that at all it was and is a valueable addition to the canon that these aspects of the character were brought to the silver screen. I truly appreciate it if it makes sense (CR, SF) but it shouldn't feel forced as in SP.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 Quantum Floral Arrangements: "We Have Petals Everywhere"
    Posts: 28,694
    I don't think Uncle Ian would disapprove of the boatloads of Bond cash piling on his plate.
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    edited October 2016 Posts: 5,939
    GBF wrote: »
    Intellectually engaging:
    FRWL, FYEO, TLD, CR, SP


    Emotionally engaging:
    FRWL, OHMSS, TSWLM, GE, QOS, SP


    Pure brainless fun:
    DAF, LALD, MR, AVTAK, DAD


    Gritty, serious:
    DN, LTK, TWINE, SF

    I actually cannot agree... Where the hell is SP intelectually engaging? I probably missed that part. The script has no interesting storyline, there are absolutely no plot twists or surprising elements. Tell me at least one interedting or memorable character in that film...

    On the other hand, I wouldn't call AVTAK brainless fun. It is not even an extremely funny film. It is in fact one of the few films where Bond is actually disgusted by the villain and shows this. After the death of Tibbitt Bond actually becomes very serious despite some silly moments. It is actually one of the few times when you see a development in Bond's emotions.

    Bond and Tibbett are the highlights of the film. They certainly have more chemistry than Moore and Roberts.
    I don't think Uncle Ian would disapprove of the boatloads of Bond cash piling on his plate.

    True. LOL. The irony is that many of the Bond novels and stories were originally screenplays or teleplays. Fleming was more successful at world-building (and novel-writing) than screenwriting.
  • Being new here I’ll add my two cents to this discussion and say that if I’m to focus on any one Bond film as “intellectually and/or emotionally challenging”, I’d have to go with CR. The introduction of Bond as gaining his “00” status and then the betrayal of Vesper were for me a great way to get back into the films. On the other hand it’s pretty difficult to see an action/adventure movie as anything other than entertainment. As much as I enjoy the Bond films they aren’t exactly King Lear, or Hamlet performances.
  • suavejmfsuavejmf Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England
    Posts: 5,131
    CR & OHMSS hands down. Genuinely moving......as much as a 007 gets anyhow.
  • dominicgreenedominicgreene The Eternal QOS Defender
    edited November 2016 Posts: 1,756
    I've said it before but QoS wins for intellectually stimulating, which is why maybe so many people dislike it. It's plot is something that is most likely happening. Obviously anyone could just say the plot is about "the dude is stealing water", but noticing Dominic Greene's plans vs. Nestle in comparison makes the story that much more intelligent.

    Also Greene has the most ironic & satisfactory death out of all the villains. Bond throws a can of oil at him, leaving him in the desert. It would require a bit more thought to figure out than your usual: gets shot, destroyed by his own machine, ego, etc.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 Quantum Floral Arrangements: "We Have Petals Everywhere"
    Posts: 28,694
    I've said it before but QoS wins for intellectually stimulating, which is why maybe so many people dislike it. It's plot is something that is most likely happening. Obviously anyone could just say the plot is about "the dude is stealing water", but noticing Dominic Greene's plans vs. Nestle in comparison makes the story that much more intelligent.

    Also Greene has the most ironic & satisfactory death out of all the villains. Bond throws a can of oil at him, leaving him in the desert. It would require a bit more thought to figure out than your usual: gets shot, destroyed by his own machine, ego, etc.

    I always hear Bond saying "this is for Fields" in his head as he throws Greene the oil. Poetic justice, and one of the most delicious send-offs for a villain in the series.
  • GBFGBF
    Posts: 3,195
    I've said it before but QoS wins for intellectually stimulating, which is why maybe so many people dislike it. It's plot is something that is most likely happening. Obviously anyone could just say the plot is about "the dude is stealing water", but noticing Dominic Greene's plans vs. Nestle in comparison makes the story that much more intelligent.

    Also Greene has the most ironic & satisfactory death out of all the villains. Bond throws a can of oil at him, leaving him in the desert. It would require a bit more thought to figure out than your usual: gets shot, destroyed by his own machine, ego, etc.

    Well it depends on what you like. THere is some irony, on the other hand, I miss the equality between Bond and the villain. I would have prefered Bond leaving a minor villain to die in the dessert, not the main villain of the film. I guess that is the reason most people dislike Greene. He is just not menacing and strong enough.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    I wouldn t really call any Bond film intellectually stimulating.
  • Posts: 4,599
    If you look at the classic Bond formula, I'm not sure if there is any space for being intellectual. It would throw the whole thing off balance. To me, science fiction is THE arena when you can mix action with thought provoking themes and issues but not Bond. As far as emotion is concerned, its purely how the audience connect with a version of Bond and the circumstances he finds himslef in. As with all of us, death of a loved one must be the hardest thing to handle so the obvious answers must be CR, OHMSS and SF.
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    Posts: 5,939
    FRWL has the most intricate yet believable plot in perhaps all of Fleming, so I would call it the most intellectually stimulating.

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