Stanley Kubrick Appreciation Thread

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  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 on fb and ajb
    Posts: 9,020
    QUESTION TO THE KUBRICK EXPERTS:

    I only realised today by stumbling on the info on Imdb that there are two versions of THE SHINING. I have the Blu-ray which contains the European version of the movie, running time 1:59 hours which is the official theatrical cut?

    I did a little research and obviously there are different opinions of which version is better or if the long version even is considered approved by Kubrick.
    But as it is a whopping half hour I wonder if I should get the American Blu-ray and watch it.

    Have you seen both versions or only one of them? What do you think about this?
  • Posts: 12,210
    I've only ever known the American version myself! And that's my favorite of all Kubrick's movies!

    Watching the underrated The Killing (1956) now. Excellent noir picture, and in my opinion, one of Kubrick's best movies.
  • Posts: 14,753
    I think one of his most underrated movie is Eyes Wide Shut. it may not be his greatest, but it's still very powerful and so insidiously intelligent. Kubrick even managed to make me enjoy Tom Cruise's acting.
  • Posts: 12,210
    Yes there is a lot to get from that film. But still, it is talked about a lot more than The Killing. I mean nearly every picture Kubrick made was excellent.
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    Posts: 3,985
    Ludovico wrote: »
    I think one of his most underrated movie is Eyes Wide Shut. it may not be his greatest, but it's still very powerful and so insidiously intelligent. Kubrick even managed to make me enjoy Tom Cruise's acting.

    Agree. Eyes Wide Shut is very underrated.

    It took me ages to finally see it, but when I did I went out and bought it the next day!

    Like a lot of Kubrick's stuff it really does benefit from repeat viewing.

    Love 2001, The Shining, Paths Of Glory, Dr Strangelove and Full Metal Jacket.

    I like Clockwork Orange (especially the soundtrack) but I think the film has dated badly. Those prison scenes are bloody awful now! I think the first half of the film is amazing but the second half drags.
  • edited May 2016 Posts: 14,753
    FoxRox wrote: »
    Yes there is a lot to get from that film. But still, it is talked about a lot more than The Killing. I mean nearly every picture Kubrick made was excellent.

    I think The Killing is not so much underrated as lesser known.
    Ludovico wrote: »
    I think one of his most underrated movie is Eyes Wide Shut. it may not be his greatest, but it's still very powerful and so insidiously intelligent. Kubrick even managed to make me enjoy Tom Cruise's acting.

    Agree. Eyes Wide Shut is very underrated.

    It took me ages to finally see it, but when I did I went out and bought it the next day!

    Like a lot of Kubrick's stuff it really does benefit from repeat viewing.

    Love 2001, The Shining, Paths Of Glory, Dr Strangelove and Full Metal Jacket.

    I like Clockwork Orange (especially the soundtrack) but I think the film has dated badly. Those prison scenes are bloody awful now! I think the first half of the film is amazing but the second half drags.

    I love the second half of A Clockwork Orange. The whole movie in fact. It is THe teenage movie IMO, the one every teenager should see. I do find it absolutely timeless.
  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 on fb and ajb
    Posts: 9,020
    I guess I will have to check out The Killing if you love it so much.

    Just finished SHINING
    Probably the very best horror movie ever. I can't think of anything that would beat it.
    The cast is spectacularly good and that hotel is a character on its own.

    Next will be the only other Kubrick movie I own (besides 2001 and Shining)
    Dr. Strangelove
  • Posts: 12,210
    The Shining and Dr. Strangelove I'd argue could be the best horror / comedy films ever. Kubrick just made some really awesome films; few have even come close to that level of talent. Spielberg's the only director I like more.
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,655
    How better do you guys think AI would have been if Kubrick had directed it? Or WOULD it have been better?
  • Posts: 12,210
    I'm glad Spielberg directed it. Speaking personally, I really love the film, and I don't know if Kubrick could have pulled off the tender scenes as well as Spielberg.
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,655
    FoxRox wrote: »
    I'm glad Spielberg directed it. Speaking personally, I really love the film, and I don't know if Kubrick could have pulled off the tender scenes as well as Spielberg.
    True, Kubrick did clinical well, but no one yanks the heartstrings like Spielberg.
  • Posts: 14,753
    Funny, I always thought there is a lot of tenderness in Paths of Glory, Lolita (no joke) and even the cruel Barry Lydon. I don't buy this "Kubrick movies were cold and soulless" claim we often hear, even among his fans. There are plenty of emotions in his folms, even if they are often dark ones. Take A Clockwork Orange for instance: Alex is a thug, a selfish, amoral, unrepentant teenager... Yet he is also an aesthete, an art lover and in his selfish and destructive ways is a pleasure seeker. He certainly has soul, however evil he choose to be.
  • edited September 2016 Posts: 12,210
    My new ranking with details:

    13. Fear and Desire (1953)
    Though Kubrick's debut has to remain in last place on my list, I got a lot more enjoyment out of it the second time around. It's very rough around the edges, but there are a lot of interesting scenes, like when Sydney starts to go crazy. Overall, a clear last place for me, but still not a bad experience.
    12. Killer's Kiss (1955)
    Kubrick's second film isn't particularly great, but it's a professional improvement over his first. The story is average, and so are the actors, but the scenery and action make it worthwhile. In particular, the boxing scene and the duel at the end are very memorable. Overall, a decent film.
    11. Lolita (1962)
    Lolita used to be #9 on my list, but it fell down on rewatch. I still believe it's a good film, but it feels unnecessarily long in the second half. I feel that the film would have been more satisfactory if trimmed. Still, the performances of Sue Lyon, James Mason, and Peter Sellers are terrific, and they really help carry the picture. The humorous side really benefits the movie, too. An interesting if uncomfortable story, to be sure.
    10. Full Metal Jacket (1987)
    If I had to call one Kubrick film overrated, it would have to be Full Metal Jacket. That's not to say I don't think it's good - far from it. It's a rock-solid war film, with a good dose of dark humor mixed with the disturbing side of things. The actors are all very good here, and the famous first half set in the boot camp is still quite an experience. My only issue is that at several times in the second half, it felt a little generic in the battle scenes, and it didn't feel quite as Kubrick-esque at those times. Overall though, definitely a good film.
    9. Eyes Wide Shut (1999)
    Kubrick's last film is also his most complicated and challenging in my opinion. Eyes Wide Shut traded places with Lolita in this ranking, and I think ultimately it's because of how mysterious it is. I love the Christmas theme (the look of the lights at night is great), and I think Cruise and Kidman do a good job. I think at times it could be a little gratuitous, in explicit content and pacing. Still, the story and themes are very engaging. The ambiguity at points is simply haunting, like the mask on the bed near the end. Also, I've heard the original cut had an additional 20 or so minutes in it, but it's never been released. Interesting...
    8. Spartacus (1960)
    Though Kubrick disowned Spartacus, it's still an amazing epic. The action is grand, the cast is great, and the story constantly intense. It's probably the least Kubrick-esque of Kubrick's movies, but it's still a very good film. It's not particularly rewatchable, but it's definitely a great movie experience.

    I'll be back to post about #7-1.
  • edited September 2016 Posts: 12,210
    7. The Killing (1956)
    It's impressive that a film as great as The Killing doesn't even reach my Top 5. Anyway, it's one of the best noir pictures out there, with a solid story, good actors, and great suspense and action. This was the point where Kubrick really started to come into his own, following his first two films. It's one of Kubrick's least-known works, but The Killing deserves to be watched and enjoyed.
    6. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
    2001: A Space Odyssey is a film that has improved with every watch so far for me, eventually surpassing The Killing on my list. It's a seminal sci-fi film, and I think it requires multiple watches to be truly appreciated. The imagery is some of the best in Kubrick's whole filmography, and though the story isn't told through conventional means, that's what helps distinguish the movie so much. A very fascinating experience.
    5. A Clockwork Orange (1971)
    Like 2001: A Space Odyssey before it, A Clockwork Orange is a one-of-a-kind experience. It's dark, disturbing, occasionally funny, and extremely satirical. It's an incredibly bleak vision of the future, so don't expect much cheeriness going in. It's deep and thought-provoking, but the main highlight is Malcolm McDowell's performance as Alex DeLarge. He is spot-on, and ultimately makes the movie work more than anything else. Great performance, great film.
    4. Barry Lyndon (1975)
    Barry Lyndon is spectacular; it's one of the best films I've seen that few ever talk about. If you can handle a slow pace and enjoy period pieces, you'll love this film as I do. The film is rich with beauty; every shot is exquisite. The story is solid, and the characters are all very well-cast. It's just an amazing film experience. I'll defend this film as one of Kubrick's best any day.
    3. Paths of Glory (1957)
    Paths of Glory might be the most accessible Kubrick film of all; I think anyone who appreciates a good, straightforward movie could appreciate this one. It's possibly the most emotional of Kubrick's films, who is often criticized for having a lack of emotion in his movies (which I don't agree with much at all). Kirk Douglas gives a great lead performance, and the actors around him do a great job as well. It's a great story, and I believe it to be among Kubrick's best (as well as one of my favorites).
    2. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)
    This film is THE satire of all films. Also it's inarguably one of the best comedies ever. I can't really say much else, except that it's one of the most purely enjoyable and rewatchable films in Kubrick's catalog. Very funny and very biting.
    1. The Shining (1980)
    The first Kubrick film I saw remains my personal favorite. Horror isn't one of my favorite movie genres in general, but The Shining is far and away my favorite horror film. The eerie setting and music always keep you alert, and the slow buildup to the explosive finale is done wonderfully. It's a great piece of entertainment. Though the whole cast is great, it's Jack Nicholson that helps make the film what it is, much like McDowell in A Clockwork Orange. One of my all-time favorite films, along with my #2 and #3 spots.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    Thanks for that,@FoxRox. Interesting and fun read.
  • Posts: 3,336
    Great stuff Fox.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    Great stuff Fox.
    I don t think he is a stuffed fox. I think he is the real deal.
  • Lancaster007Lancaster007 Shrublands Health Clinic, England
    Posts: 1,874
    QUESTION TO THE KUBRICK EXPERTS:

    I only realised today by stumbling on the info on Imdb that there are two versions of THE SHINING. I have the Blu-ray which contains the European version of the movie, running time 1:59 hours which is the official theatrical cut?

    I did a little research and obviously there are different opinions of which version is better or if the long version even is considered approved by Kubrick.
    But as it is a whopping half hour I wonder if I should get the American Blu-ray and watch it.

    Have you seen both versions or only one of them? What do you think about this?

    Both are worth a look. I prefer the long cut as there is a bit more exposition. The long cut was the original Kubrick submitted, but after some poor reviews (yes, I know it's considered a classic now but at the time I remember it getting a lot of flack) and poor box-office, Kubrick re-cut, trimming about 30 mins and this was the British and European version, and the version that Kubrick himself was more satisfied with. Me, I just like the longer one.
  • edited July 2016 Posts: 4,622
    Recently bought a Kubrick 3-pak blu-ray featuring 2001, Clockwork and Shining
    What a great purchase. I had seen all these movies before, but not for a long long time
    2001 is spectacular to watch on blu-ray.
    Clockwork is one smart film. Macdowell was born to play that part. I love the ending. Funny, bizarre satisfying.
    Shining is OK. I still find Nicholson way over the top, but that's what Kubrick wanted apparently.
    I learned that from the extensive extras features.
  • Posts: 14,753
    Birdleson wrote: »
    I took my three nephews to the Kubrick exhibit at the Jewish Museum in San Francisco today. The middle one is heavily getting into film and loves Kubrick. It was quite impressive. Each film had it's own room or section. There were plenty of costumes (SPARTACUS, 2001 apes and astronauts, EYES WIDE SHUT) and props. Ken Adam sketches and model work based on them. Model spacecrafts from 2001. Lots of photos, his early documentaries on a continuous loop. A whole room devoted to his aborted NAPOLEON which he invested several decades in preparing, including his Napoleon library. I highly recommend it if you come to The Bay Area, it runs through to October.

    That seems fascinating. Kind of funny as Kubrick had a tendency in his movies to play down his Judaism. In Eyes Wide Shut for instance the protagonist is not Jewish while in Traumnovelle he was.
  • edited September 2016 Posts: 12,210
    Going to eat some chicken and see Dr. Strangelove (1964) in the theater later today; what a fun day it will be! Lucky for me, I get to see my favorite two Kubrick films on the big screen this year! Dr. Strangelove today, and The Shining in October!!! Courtesy of Fathom Events.
  • Posts: 4,325
    FoxRox wrote: »
    Going to eat some chicken and see Dr. Strangelove (1964) in the theater later today; what a fun day it will be! Lucky for me, I get to see my favorite two Kubrick films on the big screen this year! Dr. Strangelove today, and The Shining in October!!! Courtesy of Fathom Events.

    I have a big screen at home.
  • Posts: 12,210
    tanaka123 wrote: »
    FoxRox wrote: »
    Going to eat some chicken and see Dr. Strangelove (1964) in the theater later today; what a fun day it will be! Lucky for me, I get to see my favorite two Kubrick films on the big screen this year! Dr. Strangelove today, and The Shining in October!!! Courtesy of Fathom Events.

    I have a big screen at home.

    Cool.
  • KaijuDirectorOO7KaijuDirectorOO7 Once Upon a Time Somewhere...
    Posts: 189
    First Kubrick film: Spartacus, which I watched completely by accident when I was 12.

    Now: 2001 is the best film ever made by an American director (Even if it's no.3 on my list. Kurosawa and Leone top Mr. Kubrick, IMO.)
  • Posts: 6,621
    A bit of trivia re 'Spartacus'. The famous "I'm Spartacus!" scene, Kubrick didn't like it and wanted to drop it! Kirk Douglas over-ruled him!
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    FoxRox wrote: »
    Going to eat some chicken what a fun day it will be!

    Those foxes!
  • edited September 2016 Posts: 12,210
    FoxRox wrote: »
    Going to eat some chicken what a fun day it will be!

    Those foxes!

    What? I can't help it; I love meat.
  • mcdonbbmcdonbb deep in the Heart of Texas
    Posts: 4,116
    tanaka123 wrote: »
    FoxRox wrote: »
    Going to eat some chicken and see Dr. Strangelove (1964) in the theater later today; what a fun day it will be! Lucky for me, I get to see my favorite two Kubrick films on the big screen this year! Dr. Strangelove today, and The Shining in October!!! Courtesy of Fathom Events.

    I have a big screen at home.

    I have chicken at home. :D
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy."

    I hear Kubrick typed that out personally 500 times. That tells me something.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,323
    I don't remember Kubrick doing it. He had someone doing it for him, I believe.
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