Stanley Kubrick Appreciation Thread

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  • DragonpolDragonpol https://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    Posts: 17,620
    Ludovico wrote: »
    My favourite movie, bare none.

    It is an excellently written and directed film so I can understand why it's your favourite. It's very interesting from a social commentary or polemical "future shock" point of view. One film that reminds me of it a bit in more recent times is This is England (2006). If you've not seen it it's well worth a watch.
  • Posts: 14,753
    No I haven't seen. For me ACO is the film any teenager should watch.
  • DragonpolDragonpol https://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    edited July 2021 Posts: 17,620
    Ludovico wrote: »
    No I haven't seen. For me ACO is the film any teenager should watch.

    You should definitely seek it out and give it a watch. I'm not saying it's identical to A Clockwork Orange or anything but it does have similar themes and it reminds me of it in places. It's set in 1983, just after the Falklands War. I've just spotted that the music is by Ludovico Einaudi too so surely that must be a sign that you should watch it! ;)
  • Posts: 14,753
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    Ludovico wrote: »
    No I haven't seen. For me ACO is the film any teenager should watch.

    You should definitely seek it out and give it a watch. I'm not saying it's identical to A Clockwork Orange or anything but it does have similar themes and it reminds me of it in places. It's set in 1983, just after the Falklands War. I've just spotted that the music is by Ludovico Einaudi too so surely that must be a sign that you should watch it! ;)

    And I chose my name Ludovico because of the Ludovico Technique. A Clockwork Orange has been very influential, I think after 1984 it may be the most influential dystopia ever written.
  • DragonpolDragonpol https://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    edited July 2021 Posts: 17,620
    Ludovico wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    Ludovico wrote: »
    No I haven't seen. For me ACO is the film any teenager should watch.

    You should definitely seek it out and give it a watch. I'm not saying it's identical to A Clockwork Orange or anything but it does have similar themes and it reminds me of it in places. It's set in 1983, just after the Falklands War. I've just spotted that the music is by Ludovico Einaudi too so surely that must be a sign that you should watch it! ;)

    And I chose my name Ludovico because of the Ludovico Technique. A Clockwork Orange has been very influential, I think after 1984 it may be the most influential dystopia ever written.

    Yes, of course. It's all come full circle, you could say. ;)

    I think you're right about the place of A Clockwork Orange in English literature, too. Aldous Huxley's Brave New World would be another one I suppose.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,562
    For those of you in the US (or Canada?), Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is screening a host of Kubrick movies on Friday, July 22nd, and Friday, July 29th.
    https://www.tcm.com/articles/Programming Article/021632/directed-by-stanley-kubrick?lid=vlyedm4ho3z5

    All Times EDT.

    7/22 KILLER’S KISS (1955) 8:00 PM
    7/22 PATHS OF GLORY (1958) 9:15 PM
    7/22 LOLITA (1962) 11:00 PM
    7/23 DR. STRANGELOVE 1:45 AM
    7/23 2OO1: A SPACE ODYSSEY 3:30 AM
    7/29 BARRY LYNDON (1975) 8:00 PM
    7/29 A CLOCKWORK ORANGE (1971) 11:15 PM
    7/30 EYES WIDE SHUT (1999) 1:45 AM
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    Having rewatched all the @QBrix lately, except FAD, here is my new ranking:

    01 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
    02 Barry Lyndon (1975)
    03 Lolita (1962)
    04 Spartacus (1960)
    05 Paths of Glory (1957)
    06 Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)
    07 The Killing (1956)
    08 The Shining (1980)
    09 Eyes Wide Shut (1999)
    10 Full Metal Jacket (1987)
    11 A Clockwork Orange (1971)
    12 Killer s Kiss (1955)
    13 Fear and Desire (1953)
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,562
    Nice to see that one of the few surviving props from 2OO1 is on permanent display in LA.

  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,323
    I love that my favourite film of all time is still drawing such interest. Thanks, @Dwayne .
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 3,959
    Dwayne wrote: »
    Nice to see that one of the few surviving props from 2OO1 is on permanent display in LA.

    DarthDimi wrote: »
    I love that my favourite film of all time is still drawing such interest. Thanks, @Dwayne .

    That is awesome, something that should always be persevered. Believe me, @Dwayne, 2001 (and most of Kubrick’s films) will be drawing attention for a LONG time.
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,562
    Actually, the person that tweeted this out during last night’s screening of 2OO1 should get all of the thanks!

    Its’ fairly common knowledge that while almost all of Kubrick’s personal notes on his films have survived, very few of the actual props remain. In the case of 2OO1, after a short period of time, he had them destroyed. In fact, with a few exceptions most of the museum exhibits on the film use replicas. As per the exhibit’s text, he didn’t want MGM to repurpose anything for another movie. A sad, but logical decision.

    “Robby the Robot” in FORBIDDEN PLANET: Iconic
    “Robby the Robot” in an episode of Lost in Space: Not so much. =))

    And its’ his fear that the studio would “devalue” the “effect” by reusing them that led to the decision. Michael Benson’s 2018 book SPACE ODYSSEY: The Making of a Masterpiece details one of the fallouts from this decision from the perspective of Frederick Ordway – the scientific consultant used during filming.

    One such exception is the “Star Child.” Here in New York City, The Museum of the Moving Image had a 2OO1 exhibition that opened just before COVID-19 hit, and I actually got a chance to see it up close. Very creepy!

    Trivia: Since HAL’s final voice was dubbed in post-production, assistant director Derek Cracknell did the honors on-set. Cracknell went on (among other films like Aliens and Lifeforce) to work on Live and Let Die and The Man With the Golden Gun.
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,562
    FYI,
    Most of the information relayed in this podcast was already familiar to me, but it’s still nice to hear these stories from some of those involved.

    2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY — Stanley Kubrick finds heavenly music on vinyl | MUBI Podcast


    … and Adam Savage comes face to face with a surviving proto-type of the EVA pod from the film.

  • Posts: 1,419
    Took a date to see 2001 when it first came out. What a mistake that was. The film was long and incomprehensible. As to my date, I think we went out again. Decades later I ended up showing 2001 to my Film as Lit. classes. The more I watched it, the more I read, and began to understand it. Most of what I learned I read. Once I understood the chess game, HAL's failure made sense. The screenplay was based on a Clarke short story, which Kubrick and Clarke turned into a screenplay from which Clarke later based the 2001. Yet a number of discrepancies exist between the screenplay and the novel.
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 3,959


    I wish I could go see it, or help out behind the scenes. I work in as a stagehand in a Union, I’d love help out. Hope some of you can go see it!
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