Bond 25 Production Diary

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  • Posts: 361
    The facts as I see it:

    1) no one knows what the current state of play is

    2) SF made excellent bank

    3) SP made very good bank

    4) People like Daniel Craig as Bond and will happily go to the theatre to see him.

    The million dollar question is not how B25’s narrative will serve as a denouement to Craig’s arc. That is a fascinating question, but the wider public doesn’t give a rat’s clacker. They want to be entertained.

    Ultimately, producers and distributors also have their eyes on other horizons. Bank.

    No, the real question we should be asking is this - was the drop off in bank between SF and SP a function of poor or sub-par perception of SP or was it a function of SF enjoying a rare alignment of planets (olympics, anniversary, great marketing campaign)?

    In other words - how *hard* does EON have to work to sell B25 to the hearts and minds of the great unwashed?

    Did SP damage the brand? Or is Daniel Craig’s audience ready to saddle up for more bank?
  • edited January 31 Posts: 2,868
    Good questions @GetCarter. Care to give us your opinion on some valid hypothesis?

    I don't think SP damaged the brand. Daniel Craig's audience will always be ready to saddle up because...well...they're Daniel Craig's audience. The others are Bond audience so they don't have a choice, do they? They'll go. Now, the general audience? Who knows if EON can make Bond enticing in 2019, without rebooting with a new actor/direction and after a 5 year gap? I tell you one thing, they'll have to work hard on selling it properly. And they better start doing it somehow. Building some momentum would be a smart thing to do.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited January 31 Posts: 23,883
    Denbigh wrote: »
    I'll be very surprised if we don't get a single take action scene in Bond 25:

    To be frank, I'd personally rather not see another tracking shot in a Bond film (or any other film for that matter) for a long time. Fukunaga shot his wad with this sort of thing with True Detective (I found the above sequence tiresome), and Mendes of course got a fair amount of press for his apparent single take in the SP PTS. From my perspective at least, this tracking thing is a bit passe.
    M_Balje wrote: »
    Looks a bit of game feeling that scene and bit of parody. It remember me a bit to VR scene of DAD and court scene of Skyfall also.
    I think so too. Tracking shot action scenes do have that feel. PoV films (like Hardcore Henry) also give off this vibe.

    What I'd prefer to see is an inventive fight, perhaps combined with a footchase, in an interesting location. Near a ruin or a famous landmark perhaps? At night would be nice (now that we know they are using digital).
    bondjames wrote: »
    I have a question. If the production is offered a certain maximum incentive, does that mean they have to spend up to that amount (i.e. all of it)? Or can they spend far less than the cap? I'm asking because some other efforts were denied funds due to B25 getting an allotment, so presumably they should spend it all. I'd imagine that there is a specific and substantive proposal on the table somewhere in order for these funds to have been earmarked as well. It just hasn't leaked yet.

    Interesting question. I guess the incentive granted the production reflects what the producers have in mind for the location. At the same time, if they don't spend all, one would guess that whatever's left will be spent on one of the other productions instead.
    That would seem logical, but the others have presumably been informed of their allotment, and therefore are planning their sequences and filming on this basis and with the budgets locked.

    I'd assume there must be some cutoff deadline by which the Bond people need to inform the Norwegian film authorities whether they are moving forward or not. I can't imagine it is an open ended commitment for all of 2019 without some confirmation from EON that they are taking it.
  • Posts: 2,868
    Yes, @bondjames, but have you seen that drop tracking shot of that mercedes down the Norwegian road, a few pages back? Now that's interesting, and could be an interesting take on a car chase. A bit like that gorgeous tracking shot of Connery in YOLT, on the rooftops.
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    Posts: 3,419
    Bring back David Niven as zombie Bond! Just as Fleming intended.
  • Posts: 2,868
    @echo, David Niven died in 83.

    Oh...as a zombie...right (rolls eyes and slowly, very slowly leaves the thread and the forums...)
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    edited January 31 Posts: 3,207
    bondjames wrote: »
    Denbigh wrote: »
    I'll be very surprised if we don't get a single take action scene in Bond 25:

    To be frank, I'd personally rather not see another tracking shot in a Bond film (or any other film for that matter) for a long time. Fukunaga shot his wad with this sort of thing with True Detective (I found the above sequence tiresome), and Mendes of course got a fair amount of press for his apparent single take in the SP PTS. From my perspective at least, this tracking thing is a bit passe.

    Certainly not passe, I would say. They're still very viable, imo. The tracking shot is no more or less useful than any other shot in a film, and they've been around as long as any of them. It's all in the execution. The best tracking shots don't draw attention to themselves. They also don't need to be 5+ minutes. That's usually why, for my money, they work incredibly well with hand-to-hand combat scenes and scenes like the one from True Detective, where you are totally engrossed by the situation and not waiting for a cut to happen. It takes a lot more work than a normal shot, of course, but if it enhances the experience then I'm all for it, because the results can be spectacular.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited January 31 Posts: 23,883
    Univex wrote: »
    Yes, @bondjames, but have you seen that drop tracking shot of that mercedes down the Norwegian road, a few pages back? Now that's interesting, and could be an interesting take on a car chase. A bit like that gorgeous tracking shot of Connery in YOLT, on the rooftops.
    I must have missed that @Univex. I'll take a look at it. Irrespective, I would rather not see one in the next Bond film. I've never been as impressed by this 'single take' technique as others seem to be, and that includes the sequence in YOLT & in True Detective as well. It takes me out of the film rather than keeping me immersed within it.

    That doesn't mean I want an over edited film like QoS either mind you.

    These techniques, interesting though may seem in the moment, tend to date films in my view (like Tamahori's swipe technique for DAD and Mendes's 'superhero style yellow' filtering for SP).

    I'd rather they stick to the classic style of filming and give us something for the ages.
    bondjames wrote: »
    Denbigh wrote: »
    I'll be very surprised if we don't get a single take action scene in Bond 25:

    To be frank, I'd personally rather not see another tracking shot in a Bond film (or any other film for that matter) for a long time. Fukunaga shot his wad with this sort of thing with True Detective (I found the above sequence tiresome), and Mendes of course got a fair amount of press for his apparent single take in the SP PTS. From my perspective at least, this tracking thing is a bit passe.

    Certainly not passe, I would say. They're still very viable, imo. The tracking shot is no more or less useful than any other shot in a film, and they've been around as long as any of them. It's all in the execution. The best tracking shots don't draw attention to themselves. They also don't need to be 5+ minutes. That's usually why, for my money, they work incredibly well with hand-to-hand combat scenes and scenes like the one from True Detective, where you are totally engrossed by the situation and not waiting for a cut to happen. It takes a lot more work than a normal shot, of course, but if it enhances the experience then I'm all for it, because the results can be spectacular.
    I'm afraid I wasn't engrossed by the sequence in TD at all and would have far preferred a more traditional approach to filming that entire scene. It's just not for me unfortunately, at least when it comes to action scenes.

    Mendes's work in SP though, I did like.
  • Posts: 3,900
    I look forward to the day the film is finally released and we can put this mayhem of a thread to rest...
  • edited January 31 Posts: 361
    Univex wrote: »
    Good questions @GetCarter. Care to give us your opinion on some valid hypothesis?

    I don't think SP damaged the brand. Daniel Craig's audience will always be ready to saddle up because...well...they're Daniel Craig's audience. The others are Bond audience so they don't have a choice, do they? They'll go. Now, the general audience? Who knows if EON can make Bond enticing in 2019, without rebooting with a new actor/direction and after a 5 year gap? I tell you one thing, they'll have to work hard on selling it properly. And they better start doing it somehow. Building some momentum would be a smart thing to do.

    I think there is much good will out there for DC and that EON have a ready-made foundation for B25. It will do well financially provided the marketing campaign ticks the usual boxes.

    For me, EON’s main priority should be to promote a light, adventurous Bond. This is what the market wants I feel.

    Hints at Blofeld / Swann intrigue will not carry much impact IMO due to a) the intervening gap of four years and b) lacklustre character impact in SP.

    If I was EON, I would push spectacular locations and adrenalised stunts but with the universally recognised Bondian flourishes.

    How this fits into the expectations and hopes of hardcore fans is another matter.
  • DonnyDB5DonnyDB5 Buffalo, New York
    Posts: 1,174
    jobo wrote: »
    I look forward to the day the film is finally released and we can put this mayhem of a thread to rest...

    In the meantime, I’m on pins & needles.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 3,207
    bondjames wrote: »
    Univex wrote: »
    Yes, @bondjames, but have you seen that drop tracking shot of that mercedes down the Norwegian road, a few pages back? Now that's interesting, and could be an interesting take on a car chase. A bit like that gorgeous tracking shot of Connery in YOLT, on the rooftops.
    I must have missed that @Univex. I'll take a look at it. Irrespective, I would rather not see one in the next Bond film. I've never been as impressed by this 'single take' technique as others seem to be, and that includes the sequence in YOLT & in True Detective as well. It takes me out of the film rather than keeping me immersed within it.

    That doesn't mean I want an over edited film like QoS either mind you.

    These techniques, interesting though may seem in the moment, tend to date films in my view (like Tamahori's swipe technique for DAD and Mendes's 'superhero style yellow' filtering for SP).

    I'd rather they stick to the classic style of filming and give us something for the ages.
    bondjames wrote: »
    Denbigh wrote: »
    I'll be very surprised if we don't get a single take action scene in Bond 25:

    To be frank, I'd personally rather not see another tracking shot in a Bond film (or any other film for that matter) for a long time. Fukunaga shot his wad with this sort of thing with True Detective (I found the above sequence tiresome), and Mendes of course got a fair amount of press for his apparent single take in the SP PTS. From my perspective at least, this tracking thing is a bit passe.

    Certainly not passe, I would say. They're still very viable, imo. The tracking shot is no more or less useful than any other shot in a film, and they've been around as long as any of them. It's all in the execution. The best tracking shots don't draw attention to themselves. They also don't need to be 5+ minutes. That's usually why, for my money, they work incredibly well with hand-to-hand combat scenes and scenes like the one from True Detective, where you are totally engrossed by the situation and not waiting for a cut to happen. It takes a lot more work than a normal shot, of course, but if it enhances the experience then I'm all for it, because the results can be spectacular.
    I'm afraid I wasn't engrossed by the sequence in TD at all and would have far preferred a more traditional approach to filming that entire scene. It's just not for me unfortunately, at least when it comes to action scenes.

    Mendes's work in SP though, I did like.

    I fear that the True Detective scene would have lost all impact had it not been shot the way it was. I appreciate it's not for you but the oner as a concept isn't exactly new, so it's not really "not traditional" either. Straightforward might be a better summation.

  • Posts: 2,868
    GetCarter wrote: »
    If I was EON, I would push spectacular locations and adrenalised stunts but with the universally recognised Bondian flourishes.

    Yes, that's the way to do it, IMO. I know I'd appreciate it.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    bondjames wrote: »
    Univex wrote: »
    Yes, @bondjames, but have you seen that drop tracking shot of that mercedes down the Norwegian road, a few pages back? Now that's interesting, and could be an interesting take on a car chase. A bit like that gorgeous tracking shot of Connery in YOLT, on the rooftops.
    I must have missed that @Univex. I'll take a look at it. Irrespective, I would rather not see one in the next Bond film. I've never been as impressed by this 'single take' technique as others seem to be, and that includes the sequence in YOLT & in True Detective as well. It takes me out of the film rather than keeping me immersed within it.

    That doesn't mean I want an over edited film like QoS either mind you.

    These techniques, interesting though may seem in the moment, tend to date films in my view (like Tamahori's swipe technique for DAD and Mendes's 'superhero style yellow' filtering for SP).

    I'd rather they stick to the classic style of filming and give us something for the ages.
    bondjames wrote: »
    Denbigh wrote: »
    I'll be very surprised if we don't get a single take action scene in Bond 25:

    To be frank, I'd personally rather not see another tracking shot in a Bond film (or any other film for that matter) for a long time. Fukunaga shot his wad with this sort of thing with True Detective (I found the above sequence tiresome), and Mendes of course got a fair amount of press for his apparent single take in the SP PTS. From my perspective at least, this tracking thing is a bit passe.

    Certainly not passe, I would say. They're still very viable, imo. The tracking shot is no more or less useful than any other shot in a film, and they've been around as long as any of them. It's all in the execution. The best tracking shots don't draw attention to themselves. They also don't need to be 5+ minutes. That's usually why, for my money, they work incredibly well with hand-to-hand combat scenes and scenes like the one from True Detective, where you are totally engrossed by the situation and not waiting for a cut to happen. It takes a lot more work than a normal shot, of course, but if it enhances the experience then I'm all for it, because the results can be spectacular.
    I'm afraid I wasn't engrossed by the sequence in TD at all and would have far preferred a more traditional approach to filming that entire scene. It's just not for me unfortunately, at least when it comes to action scenes.

    Mendes's work in SP though, I did like.

    I fear that the True Detective scene would have lost all impact had it not been shot the way it was. I appreciate it's not for you but the oner as a concept isn't exactly new, so it's not really "not traditional" either. Straightforward might be a better summation.
    Yes, I should have been more clear. Traditional as far as action in Bond films go is what I meant to say.

    Let's see if he does one or not. I know what I'd prefer.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 3,207
    bondjames wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    Univex wrote: »
    Yes, @bondjames, but have you seen that drop tracking shot of that mercedes down the Norwegian road, a few pages back? Now that's interesting, and could be an interesting take on a car chase. A bit like that gorgeous tracking shot of Connery in YOLT, on the rooftops.
    I must have missed that @Univex. I'll take a look at it. Irrespective, I would rather not see one in the next Bond film. I've never been as impressed by this 'single take' technique as others seem to be, and that includes the sequence in YOLT & in True Detective as well. It takes me out of the film rather than keeping me immersed within it.

    That doesn't mean I want an over edited film like QoS either mind you.

    These techniques, interesting though may seem in the moment, tend to date films in my view (like Tamahori's swipe technique for DAD and Mendes's 'superhero style yellow' filtering for SP).

    I'd rather they stick to the classic style of filming and give us something for the ages.
    bondjames wrote: »
    Denbigh wrote: »
    I'll be very surprised if we don't get a single take action scene in Bond 25:

    To be frank, I'd personally rather not see another tracking shot in a Bond film (or any other film for that matter) for a long time. Fukunaga shot his wad with this sort of thing with True Detective (I found the above sequence tiresome), and Mendes of course got a fair amount of press for his apparent single take in the SP PTS. From my perspective at least, this tracking thing is a bit passe.

    Certainly not passe, I would say. They're still very viable, imo. The tracking shot is no more or less useful than any other shot in a film, and they've been around as long as any of them. It's all in the execution. The best tracking shots don't draw attention to themselves. They also don't need to be 5+ minutes. That's usually why, for my money, they work incredibly well with hand-to-hand combat scenes and scenes like the one from True Detective, where you are totally engrossed by the situation and not waiting for a cut to happen. It takes a lot more work than a normal shot, of course, but if it enhances the experience then I'm all for it, because the results can be spectacular.
    I'm afraid I wasn't engrossed by the sequence in TD at all and would have far preferred a more traditional approach to filming that entire scene. It's just not for me unfortunately, at least when it comes to action scenes.

    Mendes's work in SP though, I did like.

    I fear that the True Detective scene would have lost all impact had it not been shot the way it was. I appreciate it's not for you but the oner as a concept isn't exactly new, so it's not really "not traditional" either. Straightforward might be a better summation.
    Yes, I should have been more clear. Traditional as far as action in Bond films go is what I meant to say.

    Let's see if he does one or not. I know what I'd prefer.

    Shorter ones would be acceptable to me in this case, 30 seconds maybe. Seems more appropriate for Bond. I highly doubt we'll be getting an extended hand-to-hand combat scene and and as I said above, that's where the oner works really well when it comes to action scenes. Gunplay? Not so much.
  • BMW_with_missilesBMW_with_missiles All the usual refinements.
    Posts: 2,791
    Univex wrote: »
    @echo, David Niven died in 83.

    Oh...as a zombie...right (rolls eyes and slowly, very slowly leaves the thread and the forums...)

    No no wait! It even gives us a good title: ZomBond
  • Posts: 2,868
    Univex wrote: »
    @echo, David Niven died in 83.
    Oh...as a zombie...right (rolls eyes and slowly, very slowly leaves the thread and the forums...)
    No no wait! It even gives us a good title: ZomBond
    9cd7d9f961edadae420f6485964ed135.jpg
  • Posts: 3,900
    Univex wrote: »
    GetCarter wrote: »
    If I was EON, I would push spectacular locations and adrenalised stunts but with the universally recognised Bondian flourishes.

    Yes, that's the way to do it, IMO. I know I'd appreciate it.

    Definitely! I would love to see some groundbreaking stunt work like in the old days. There are talented, fearless people doing crazy things around also today. Scout them and investigate wether what they do could integrated into modern action scenes. Probably the best we have got in modern times is the parkour chase with Sebastian Foucan. More unique scenes like that please!
  • edited February 1 Posts: 361
    Univex wrote: »
    GetCarter wrote: »
    If I was EON, I would push spectacular locations and adrenalised stunts but with the universally recognised Bondian flourishes.

    Yes, that's the way to do it, IMO. I know I'd appreciate it.

    If Craig’s last film was most notable for a tight espionage story and memorable action scenes I’d be more than satisfied.

    As jobo says, we need a return to physicality.

  • edited February 1 Posts: 2,868
    GetCarter wrote: »
    a tight espionage story

    Hope springs eternal.
  • MurdockMurdock Mr. 2000
    Posts: 15,718
    jobo wrote: »
    I look forward to the day the film is finally released and we can put this mayhem of a thread to rest...

    Then a few days or weeks after Bond25 comes out, a Bond 26 production thread will be made and the mayhem will continue. =))
  • Posts: 2,868
    2063 pages, wow, just, wow.
  • Posts: 2,868
    GetCarter wrote: »
    As jobo says, we need a return to physicality.
    150314-bond-sketch-daniel-craig.jpg
    "Sure, sure, I can do physical..."

  • In 2017, Snider was (sort of) promoting the idea that Eon wanted to establish a "James Bond universe. In this video (beginning at 2:12 mark) he doesn't really sound like he knows that much.

  • dominicgreenedominicgreene The Eternal QOS Defender
    Posts: 1,706
    BT3366 wrote: »
    I am seriously considering boycotting this particular thread as it does nothing for me. For instance, I was last on the boards yesterday afternoon and I find roughly 110 new posts that have amounted to, well, nothing but speculation, hand-wringing, cynicism and fear.

    I get especially wary of these "insiders" that so many of you cling to for some morsel of information. That's the problem with this age that anybody with a keyboard or webcam can have people eating out of their hand.

    None of it does anything to enhance my enthusiasm for a new Bond film and I think I'll stick to discussing the other films I've enjoyed for years along with MI and certain others. Alert me when there's real news.

    Very constructive feedback that definitely put an end to the terrible discussion. I salute your bravery, fellow comrade.
  • talos7talos7 New Orleans
    Posts: 4,336
    At this point I skim this thread, more often than not completely skipping posts by certain members who appear to suffer from a Chicken Little complex .
    I’m stoked about Bond 25 and have read nothing that legitimately should cause concern .
  • Posts: 124
    talos7 wrote: »
    At this point I skim this thread, more often than not completely skipping posts by certain members who appear to suffer from a Chicken Little complex .
    I’m stoked about Bond 25 and have read nothing that legitimately should cause concern .

    I think it's just you and me both.
  • DenbighDenbigh UK
    Posts: 1,419
    acidie wrote: »
    talos7 wrote: »
    At this point I skim this thread, more often than not completely skipping posts by certain members who appear to suffer from a Chicken Little complex .
    I’m stoked about Bond 25 and have read nothing that legitimately should cause concern .

    I think it's just you and me both.

    Me three :D
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 937
    Me four. At least there's other James Bond entertainment that I haven't done yet, namely reading.
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    Posts: 3,419
    Five.
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