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AlexanderWaverly

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AlexanderWaverly
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  • peter
    Not to worry. Most productions treat a script like a blue-print.

    A spec script is bought, and/or a writer hired to write a draft (s). The re-writes will usually be based on the producers notes.

    When the project is given a green light, a director and star come on board. And they usually have the clout, and were hired because of this clout, to start making changes that best suit their strengths.

    Usually at this point, the original writer(s) are replaced with a person/people that the director and star are comfortable with.

    And so the development process goes.

    Often, script pages are constantly being polished until a film is locked. Whether it's dialogue clean up, a change in location, or a change in a set-piece.

    The script(s) is(are) only blue prints until the picture's locked.

    In the end, BB, MW and company have been doing this for a very long time, with more success than not.
    December 2014
  • Welcome Aboard!
    March 2011