The James Bond Wardrobe/Style Thread

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  • SarkSark Guangdong, PRC
    Posts: 1,138
    I find suits reminders of the corporate world

    They're also reminders of government officialdom. As long as they wear suits in Whitehall I think Bond will spend the majority of his time in them.
  • RC7RC7
    Posts: 10,512
    I have proven you wrong

    Out of interest, how old are you?
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited January 2015 Posts: 23,883
    @doubleoego, It was Craig who insisted on the AT. It was not meant to be an official watch initially, only the PO. He is not a fan of the thick 8500 PO's apparently. I have a QoS style 2500 PO (just bought it used and love it). I'm waiting for the 8500 AT to go on clearance (which is likely to happen in the next few months as they are now pushing the master line) and then I'll pick one up if the price is right. I agree, the 8500 AT is a beaut.

    Sad though. I personally believe that the Rolex Submariner is the definitive Bond watch (goes with anything and everything), but you're right - he probably won't wear one as Bond.
  • doghouse wrote: »
    Villiers53 wrote: »
    doghouse wrote: »
    Hopefully the negative reaction from the menswear community last time will result in suits that fit this time.
    I really hope that Everest reprises his role as Fiennes tailor, had some beautiful pieces in Skyfall.

    @doghouse is correct. Those awful Tom Ford suits should be abandoned and 007 sent to 'The Row' for a fitting.
    IVNSHO (in Villieurs53's not so humble opinion) Craig, when suited, succeeded in looking like Pee-Wee Herman in SF. His pants look fit to split at any moment and those ill cut jackets would have been more appropriate adorning an estate agent.
    Fiennes on the other hand looked splendid and going forward I'm quite sure that the new 'M' will want 007 to be correctly dressed and will dispatch him to Saville Row without further ado.
    The question is to which tailor? They all have quite different house styles but considering Craig's stocky, muscular physique, Villieurs53 wouldn't hesitate to recommend the fabulous Anderson & Sheppard.
    Over the years, A&S have catered to the rich and famous but more importantly to gentleman of great distinction and style. Fred Astaire was a stalwart and Bryan Ferry is a regular.
    Their single breasted would be perfect for Craig, the way the jacket drapes gives a good height impression, is slimming whilst giving him great freedom of movement. In terms of detail they should be classic, two button, twin vented with two exterior straight flapped pockets.
    His trousers should be either flat fronted or single pleated, have 15" bottoms, no cuffs and side fasteners (no belt loops) and his suit cloths should be 15mil or lighter.
    Shirts could be from either Turnbull & Asser or Emma Willis and should feature a medium spread collar and single cuffs (double cuffs and links get in the way during fights) his shoes should be bespoke by John Lobb with re-enforced steel toe caps.
    His ties should only be knitted silk from Charvet.
    With regard to his overcoat, Villieurs53 thinks Bond should favour a dark pea coat in cashmere for versatility and as a nod to 007's naval background.
    In terms of his casual wardrobe, Belstaff and Barbour should continue to be a good source of field jackets with Sunspel providing the best polo shirts. Trousers should be either chinos from Dunhill or cords from A&S depending on the climate. Jeans should be kept to a minimum but were appropriate Duhill will suffice.
    Sweaters should come uniquely from A&S haberdashery. They have a great choice and Audie Charles will see him right.
    Accessories should be kept to an absolute minimum. Bond is a spy not a dandy and he should ditch that crass, ostentatious Omega watch in favour of a plain stainless steel Rolex Oyster Perpetual. Sunglasses are only acceptable when driving, skiing or in hot climates and should be from Persol.
    Villieurs53 thinks this covers everything — any questions?

    Quite specific vision I dare say.

    It is because Bond is very specific.
    Fleming had him fastidious but very understated. This was for a reason. Yes, he was a British gentleman but he was also a man of the world and above all else, a secret agent.
    This is why Ian didn't impose any of his own, more dandified affectations on him. He kept it simple, classy and elegant without being at all showy.
    Of course, menswear has moved on enormously since Fleming's time but I think we should update Bond whilst sticking to his credo. After all, we are talking about 007. Not Hercule Poirot or Jason King!
  • NicNacNicNac Administrator, Moderator
    Posts: 7,526
    It's a good thread guys. Let's not allow it to get overheated.
  • RC7RC7
    Posts: 10,512
    Villiers53 wrote: »
    He kept it simple, classy and elegant without being at all showy.
    Of course, menswear has moved on enormously since Fleming's time but I think we should update Bond whilst sticking to his credo.

    Definitely. I think the modern trend of very slim-fitting suits will date relatively quickly.
  • doubleoegodoubleoego #LightWork
    Posts: 11,135
    bondjames wrote: »
    @doubleoego, It was Craig who insisted on the AT. He is not a fan of the thick 8500 PO's apparently. I have a QoS style 2500 PO (just bought it used and love it). I'm waiting for the 8500 AT to go on clearance (which is likely to happen in the next few months as they are now pushing the master line) and then I'll pick one up if the price is right. I agree, the 8500 AT is a beaut.

    Sad though. I personally believe that the Rolex Submariner is the definitive Bond watch (goes with anything and everything), but you're right - he probably won't wear one as Bond.

    Yeah Craig's definitely a fan of the AT models. The SF AT was actually made based on his requirements I believe and what's interesting, the 38.5mm 8500 appears bigger than its actual spec design. I originally bought the 41.5mm and after owning it for 3 weeks I returned it and swapped it for the 38.5, it just looks classier. Definitely pick it up when you can because it's a gorgeous piece that can also be worn with anything. I was in Nice a few months ago and I tell you, there's nothing quite like riding a jet ski, wearing a Bond watch and humming tge Bond theme out loud when your speeding about in the sea :D

    As for Rolex there are some lovely l-lovely pieces. I'm loving the sub c. However, Rolex will remain the literary Bond watch which is a bit disappointing but Omega are doing a terrific job with their lineups. The PO was an instant classic from day one and the liquid metal version is one of the sexiest watches ever made.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited January 2015 Posts: 23,883
    I tried to get an original liquid metal PO (special edition - 1948 made - 2500 version with the ceramic dial and bezel) but it's near impossible to find one. So I settled on the regular 2500 used on ebay and I love it. Totally agree on the 8500 AT in 38.5 size. Such a classic. Just too pricey for me until it gets cleared.

    Now, if only I could save up for an Aston :P
  • SarkSark Guangdong, PRC
    Posts: 1,138
    RC7 wrote: »
    Villiers53 wrote: »
    He kept it simple, classy and elegant without being at all showy.
    Of course, menswear has moved on enormously since Fleming's time but I think we should update Bond whilst sticking to his credo.

    Definitely. I think the modern trend of very slim-fitting suits will date relatively quickly.

    At first I kind of liked it as a reaction to the dark ages of the late 90s and early 00s when most men wore completely shapeless boxes, but it certainly went too far. Look at most of Connery's suits. They'd aged quite well. They're fitted and have narrow lapels and trousers, but aren't "skinny" in the modern sense.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited January 2015 Posts: 23,883
    I love the 60's style cut for suit jackets. It's slim without being too constrictive. The only problem IMO is the pleated pants.

    PS: And I'd love it if Craig wore shirts with the Turnbull & Asser Connery/Moore (in LALD) upturned cuff (as in images below). haven't seen that in a while. Pure class.
    [img][/img]Dr-No_Sean-Connery_Glen-check-suit-mid.bmp.jpg
    Dr-No_Sean-Connery_light-grey-suit_Trousers-Daks-Tops.bmp.jpg
    6eeee868633272b636df0160b41ecb48.jpg
  • Posts: 260
    bondjames wrote: »
    @doubleoego, It was Craig who insisted on the AT.

    That's what I recall too.
    Villiers53 wrote: »

    It is because Bond is very specific.
    Fleming had him fastidious but very understated. This was for a reason. Yes, he was a British gentleman but he was also a man of the world and above all else, a secret agent.
    This is why Ian didn't impose any of his own, more dandified affectations on him. He kept it simple, classy and elegant without being at all showy.
    Of course, menswear has moved on enormously since Fleming's time but I think we should update Bond whilst sticking to his credo. After all, we are talking about 007. Not Hercule Poirot or Jason King!

    Certainly. I personally would say A&S are way too relaxed and drapey. Something from Poole or Richard Anderson perhaps, or even back to Hayward on Mount.

    You bring up one good point though, if round about. Menswear has moved on a lot, but the basic lounge suit has not. It's represented a continuum that has never really been seen before in style. In Regency England menswear changed literally by the week and even day, but once the lounge suit hit the scene about a century ago, it's been steadfast. The fact that it is based on specific proportions that flatter a man is really the only explanation I can really see being valid.
  • edited January 2015 Posts: 260
    RC7 wrote: »
    Villiers53 wrote: »
    He kept it simple, classy and elegant without being at all showy.
    Of course, menswear has moved on enormously since Fleming's time but I think we should update Bond whilst sticking to his credo.

    Definitely. I think the modern trend of very slim-fitting suits will date relatively quickly.

    For sure. A well balanced suit is a lot more versatile. You could take one of Connery's first few suits and wear today without being noticed whatsoever. Moore's stuff, not so much.

  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded Riding a white swan to Matera
    Posts: 12,436
    I am looking forward to seeing Bond in stylish apres ski wear, as well as ski wear. I think some gorgeous sweaters, turtlenecks too, would look great on him.
  • aaron819aaron819 Switzerland
    Posts: 1,208
    @4EverBonded Good point. What do you guys think Bond will be wearing in the Austria scenes and what will Q be wearing and what will Madeline be wearing
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited January 2015 Posts: 23,883
    They have been going back to a somewhat more classic look and feel recently so I would think OHMSS (Tracy & Bond) would be a good place to start in terms of what look we are likely to see in Austria when casual.
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded Riding a white swan to Matera
    Posts: 12,436
    The snowy scenes alone will be reminiscent enough of OHMSS. I don't want any of the fashion from that film in this one.

    So I want modern but with an Austrian touch for the sweaters, jacket, relaxing wear.
  • Posts: 14,101

    In general, I find the clothes Craig/Bond wears pretty much flawless. Yes, a suit does look corporate, but this is to be expected when traveling if you want to look like something else than a spy. But it is important that he does not wear a suit, especially not a tuxedo, for every occasion. Brosnan sometimes was IMO overly elegant. There should be some kind of sobriety with Bond's elegance. The villain, however, can be overly elegant. Especially if he does not have the body for it.
  • edited January 2015 Posts: 260
    Ludovico wrote: »

    In general, I find the clothes Craig/Bond wears pretty much flawless. Yes, a suit does look corporate, but this is to be expected when traveling if you want to look like something else than a spy. But it is important that he does not wear a suit, especially not a tuxedo, for every occasion. Brosnan sometimes was IMO overly elegant. There should be some kind of sobriety with Bond's elegance. The villain, however, can be overly elegant. Especially if he does not have the body for it.

    I think the biggest misstep with Pierce was going with Brioni. Bond is quintessentially British. Tom Ford has more of a British aesthetic at least. Brioni did do a better job in CR, though I think the QoS suits are the best of the contemporary era.

    The suit is a pretty integral part of any upscale urban centre these days whether it be leisure or commerce, so there is really plenty of aesthetic space to operate in.
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded Riding a white swan to Matera
    edited January 2015 Posts: 12,436
    Ah but Pierce looked wonderful in all of his clothes during his tenure.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited January 2015 Posts: 23,883
    There were a lot of things that went wrong in terms of branding at that time. Brioni, Omega, BMW. MGM in dire straits and doing whatever they could to get money in the door to fund operations. Thankfully, some of these branding misjudgements have been corrected, but once the cat is out of the bag as they say.......Now we have to contend with Sony equipment everywhere.
  • Posts: 260
    Ah but Pierce looked wonderful in all of his clothes during his tenure.

    Didn't do much for me, but I'm not a fan of Italian tailoring in most circumstances. Good for really casual stuff because it's so relaxed in a lot of instances, but British stuff has a cleaner cut.

  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited January 2015 Posts: 23,883
    doghouse wrote: »
    Ah but Pierce looked wonderful in all of his clothes during his tenure.

    Didn't do much for me, but I'm not a fan of Italian tailoring in most circumstances. Good for really casual stuff because it's so relaxed in a lot of instances, but British stuff has a cleaner cut.

    I agree that Brosnan looked good in his suits (one of his greatest assets IMO) but the materials were a little too 'Canali' for me. They appeared a little too delicate. Too light as is the Contintental style.

    I personally prefer the more structured British cuts (two vents and all) as well, and as I said above, I'd love to see a return of the Turnbull & Asser cuff shirt.
  • doghouse wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    @doubleoego, It was Craig who insisted on the AT.

    That's what I recall too.
    Villiers53 wrote: »

    It is because Bond is very specific.
    Fleming had him fastidious but very understated. This was for a reason. Yes, he was a British gentleman but he was also a man of the world and above all else, a secret agent.
    This is why Ian didn't impose any of his own, more dandified affectations on him. He kept it simple, classy and elegant without being at all showy.
    Of course, menswear has moved on enormously since Fleming's time but I think we should update Bond whilst sticking to his credo. After all, we are talking about 007. Not Hercule Poirot or Jason King!

    Certainly. I personally would say A&S are way too relaxed and drapey. Something from Poole or Richard Anderson perhaps, or even back to Hayward on Mount.

    You bring up one good point though, if round about. Menswear has moved on a lot, but the basic lounge suit has not. It's represented a continuum that has never really been seen before in style. In Regency England menswear changed literally by the week and even day, but once the lounge suit hit the scene about a century ago, it's been steadfast. The fact that it is based on specific proportions that flatter a man is really the only explanation I can really see being valid.

    A&S would be perfect for Craig's Bond.
    When you have a physique like Daniel's you need a house style that will soften him and make him more sophisticated not truss him up like a thug.
    Dougie Hayward would have done it in his day but sadly, he is no longer with us and anyway, his cut had a lot in common with the classic A&S.
    The proportions are key and although all bespoke tailors will claim that they will change things to suit you, bespoke aficionados know that the greats are schooled in a house style that they will tailor that style for what they consider to be a perfect fit.
    The fact remains that certain house styles favour certain physiques. Villieurs53 loves Chittleborough and Morgan on Charlie Watts but knows it's not for him. Richard Anderson and Richard James for that matter are great for tall, thin guys but don't IVNSHO do a thing when you are muscular with a stocky physique.
    Going back to the watch debate, Fleming's Bond wouldn't have been seen stiff in one of those Omega abominations. Frankly they were always the poor man's Rolex and although Ian was never definitive about 007's exact model, the most detailed description in OHMSS would indicate that it was a 1953 white faced Rolex Oyster Perpetual with a luminous dial. The perfect discrete time piece that would be equally at home with a dining suit or diving suit. Again, the aim should be classy British discretion rather than looking like a Russian oligarch!
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited January 2015 Posts: 23,883
    Villiers53 wrote: »
    Again, the aim should be classy British discretion rather than looking like a Russian oligarch!

    Agree 100%. My vote goes to the Submariner. Worked perfectly for Connery, Lazenby, Moore, & Dalton, in a suit or casual. The ultimate wear it anywhere piece, & disreet, apart from the cyclops date.
  • SarkSark Guangdong, PRC
    Posts: 1,138
    that's probably because it's a hell of a lot hotter in Italy than England ;)
  • aaron819aaron819 Switzerland
    Posts: 1,208
    @Sark I agree with your point that it's hell hotter in Italy than England.
    ;-)
  • edited January 2015 Posts: 260
    Villiers53 wrote: »

    A&S would be perfect for Craig's Bond.
    When you have a physique like Daniel's you need a house style that will soften him and make him more sophisticated not truss him up like a thug.
    Dougie Hayward would have done it in his day but sadly, he is no longer with us and anyway, his cut had a lot in common with the classic A&S.
    The proportions are key and although all bespoke tailors will claim that they will change things to suit you, bespoke aficionados know that the greats are schooled in a house style that they will tailor that style for what they consider to be a perfect fit.
    The fact remains that certain house styles favour certain physiques. Villieurs53 loves Chittleborough and Morgan on Charlie Watts but knows it's not for him. Richard Anderson and Richard James for that matter are great for tall, thin guys but don't IVNSHO do a thing when you are muscular with a stocky physique.
    Going back to the watch debate, Fleming's Bond wouldn't have been seen stiff in one of those Omega abominations. Frankly they were always the poor man's Rolex and although Ian was never definitive about 007's exact model, the most detailed description in OHMSS would indicate that it was a 1953 white faced Rolex Oyster Perpetual with a luminous dial. The perfect discrete time piece that would be equally at home with a dining suit or diving suit. Again, the aim should be classy British discretion rather than looking like a Russian oligarch!

    A&S would fit a rotund guy quite well, but that's not Craig. A&S also had an appalling run of mifires for a bit there, though that seems to have sorted itself out. With Hitchcock gone now it's still going to be interesting to see where the house goes style wise. Hayward certainly perfect, and Timothy Everest and Poole are probably the closest analogues today, though from your list Chittleborough could pull off most anything and would be pretty intriguing.
  • doubleoegodoubleoego #LightWork
    Posts: 11,135
    Omega abominations? Fleming was neither an horologist nor a watch expert. One should take a close look at the history of both rolex and omega before making typical misinformed perceptions of brand.
  • Posts: 665
    Vesper to Bond: By the cut of your suit, you went to Oxford or wherever, and actually think human beings dress like that. But you wear it with such disdain...

    This is one of my favorite bits of dialogue from CR. As much as I enjoy it, I think it applies to SC far more. I've always enjoyed SC's lack of fussiness.

    In SF I felt Craig's suits looked a little snug. Regardless, I do like to see Bond in a tux.

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