Last Movie you Watched?

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  • edited April 2023 Posts: 17,276
    GoldenGun wrote: »
    GoldenGun wrote: »
    GoldenGun wrote: »
    I watched Norwegian war film NARVIK (Kampen om Narvik) the other day.

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    Thought it was pretty good, and it raised some interesting questions regarding the choices one has to make during conflicts, choices that aren't based on their personal ideology or egocentric opportunism, but they're only made in order to protect their loved ones.

    Haven't watched this one yet, but probably should as my grandfather happened to be in Narvik during the invasion in 1940.

    I was in Narvik a few years ago during the New Year's Eve celebrations and got into conversations with some locals and they told me about Narvik's WW history. It was interesting, in my everlasting journey through Eurocinema, to come across a Norwegian film that deals with this particular subject. For you though, it must be even more interesting than it was for me.

    As for the film itself, it's competently made, if not groundbreaking, though it does have some interesting ideas. Especially the way it doesn't look at the situation as a black-and-white / heroes-vs-villains one.

    What brought you to Narvik during New Year's Eve @GoldenGun? I've never been there myself, but it's on my list of places to visit.

    Well we wanted to go to the snow for this period of the year, since that rarely ever happens anymore over here, and we also wanted to know more of Sami culture. Narvik was the most northern airport that fitted our budget and agenda, so I suppose that's why we went there.

    Even though we have had warmer winters in Norway in recent years too, you can be fairly sure that you will have snow in Northern Norway at that time of the year! Sami culture has a long and interesting history over here – obviously complex too, with forced assimilation and discrimination. Pathfinder (1987), and The Kautokeino Rebellion (2008) – both by Sámi film director Nils Gaup, are worth checking out if you want to see films about Sámi culture and history.
    GoldenGun wrote: »
    If you want to see more WW2 films like this one, you might want to check out Max Manus (2008) and Den 12. mann (The 12th Man – 2017). Both would fall under the category "competently made, though not groundbreaking". There's also Krigsseileren (War Sailor – also 2022), though I haven't seen that one.

    I will definitely check those out. Max Manus has been on my watchlist for quite some time.

    Max Manus is probably the most popular of these WW2 films that have been produced in recent years (although you might argue that this isn't a recent film). It's not one of my favourites though; he film is alright, but I've never been a fan of Aksel Hennie, who plays Max Manus in the film.
  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe "I tolerate this century, but I don't enjoy it."Moderator
    Posts: 13,894
    John Carpenter's Vampires (1998)
    johncarpentersvampires.jpg
    Awesome Neo-Western/Action/Horror hybrid starring James Woods. Rips up the Vampire rule book, and cherry picks what it wants. Crosses don't work, and Churches aren't consecrated grounds, but sunlight does work, as does a good ol' stake to the heart.
  • Last Bond movie: Goldfinger in cinema in Amsterdam last Thursday. Amazing to see it on the big screen for the first time.
  • Posts: 15,801
    Received another Lana Turner movie in the mail today. I'm actually watching LOVE HAS MANY FACES (1965) right now.

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    Begins with a dead body washed up on the beach, so already I'm going to give this a postive review. The cinematography reminds me of an Elvis movie, and if this weren't a drama, I'm thinking The King could pop up at any time and sing for us.

    Here's my review so far..............

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  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,621
    I hope you had a enjoyable watch @ToTheRight, but I’m still stuck on the image of Stefanie “April Dancer” Powers being in this movie. :x

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    Here is a bit a trivia that may get you a free beer someday. Ms. Powers was once married to actor Gary Lockwood and during the dialogue run-throughs for “2OO1”, she read the lines of the HAL 9000 computer.

    Stefanie-Powers-e1574441748810.jpg

    How can she possibly be 80 years of age?
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    edited April 2023 Posts: 8,683
    We just followed up on our list of Ealing comedies by watching this one:
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    The story is that in 1947, a left-over German bomb due to be defused explodes in the Central London area of Pimlico, laying bare a cavern with medieval treasures and also a document proving that the surrounding neighbourhood was actually part of Burgundy. So the citizens (19 families, I understand) set up their own sovereign state, especially dodging English anti-black-market laws and reviving their economy that way, while the city of London cuts off their water, but normal citizens support the "Burgundians" by throwing food across the barbed wire that was set up. The rest of the story is really just negotiating and ultimate reaching agreement with the UK government to rejoin England. There is a lot that is funny about this movie, but ultimately there's not much of a story and an ending that makes sense in a really satisfying way, it just sort of peters out. Still, it's a pleasant movie for a relaxed evening. And Margaret Rutherford (just to mention one of the actors) is priceless as the history professor who determines the veracity of the old documents.

    Greatest quote: "We always were English, and we'll always be English, and it's just because we are English that we're sticking up for our rights to be Burgundians!" Tells you a lot about Brexit.
  • Posts: 15,801
    Dwayne wrote: »
    I hope you had a enjoyable watch @ToTheRight, but I’m still stuck on the image of Stefanie “April Dancer” Powers being in this movie. :x

    s-l1600.jpg

    Here is a bit a trivia that may get you a free beer someday. Ms. Powers was once married to actor Gary Lockwood and during the dialogue run-throughs for “2OO1”, she read the lines of the HAL 9000 computer.

    Stefanie-Powers-e1574441748810.jpg

    How can she possibly be 80 years of age?

    Yeah, @Dwayne. Stephanie Powers was great as Lana's rival in this movie. Never knew that about 2001. Great stuff!
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    Posts: 6,779
    Thanks for the advice @Torgeirtrap!
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    We just followed up on our list of Ealing comedies by watching this one:
    91qhG1faJjL._AC_SL1500_.jpg
    The story is that in 1947, a left-over German bomb due to be defused explodes in the Central London area of Pimlico, laying bare a cavern with medieval treasures and also a document proving that the surrounding neighbourhood was actually part of Burgundy. So the citizens (19 families, I understand) set up their own sovereign state, especially dodging English anti-black-market laws and reviving their economy that way, while the city of London cuts off their water, but normal citizens support the "Burgundians" by throwing food across the barbed wire that was set up. The rest of the story is really just negotiating and ultimate reaching agreement with the UK government to rejoin England. There is a lot that is funny about this movie, but ultimately there's not much of a story and an ending that makes sense in a really satisfying way, it just sort of peters out. Still, it's a pleasant movie for a relaxed evening. And Margaret Rutherford (just to mention one of the actors) is priceless as the history professor who determines the veracity of the old documents.

    Greatest quote: "We always were English, and we'll always be English, and it's just because we are English that we're sticking up for our rights to be Burgundians!" Tells you a lot about Brexit.

    Have to watch this one to at some point, sounds interesting!
  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe "I tolerate this century, but I don't enjoy it."Moderator
    Posts: 13,894
    The Hard Corps (2006)
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    Not a classic, but Van Damme kicks, punches and shoots people. Does what it says in the tin nothing more or less.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 40,461
    An American In Paris

    Dazzling, magical, colorful fun. The cast utilize their talents with great strength and appeal and I loved the dance numbers and songs throughout, especially that phenomenal finale whose dream-like nature made me think of the ending of All That Jazz, which is equally brilliant.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    edited April 2023 Posts: 23,534
    Screaming for more:
    A SCREAM marathon


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    When Scream hit theatres in 1996, I was barely old enough (fourteen) to watch the film -- but I did, and thus began a love affair with a movie series that I am as big a fan of today as I was back then. Famous for its deconstruction of the slasher film, Scream effectively revived the genre by paving the way for more instalments in older, dead-and-buried slasher series, and inspiring new series as well. Director Wes Craven, known for the iconic A Nightmare On Elm Street, had hit a disastrous low point in his career in the late '80s / early '90s but released an interesting experimental meta-horror movie in 1994, the largely neglected Wes Craven's New Nightmare, a film that seems to have inspired, at least in concept, what would become Scream. And yet, credit where credit is due: it's Kevin Williamson's clever script that ultimately allowed the so-called 'master of horror' one of the biggest successes of his career.

    Neve Campbell, David Arquette and Courtney Cox will probably forever be known as the lead cast members of Scream, with no less than (so far) five or even six consecutive starring roles in the entire series. When Scream opens, however, all eyes are on '80s child actor Drew Barrymore who, after years of attracting sensationally troubling press alerts and one notorious Playboy shoot, returned to form in what I consider one of the very best opening scenes in a horror film to date. Grabbing us by the throat and surprising moviegoers everywhere, that scene immortalized Scream as a film full of surprises and twists that redefined the slasher genre's 'rules', established more than a decade before. Add to that the iconic Ghostface mask, instant-classic lines ("What's your favorite scary movie?”) and Marco Beltrami's effective score, and here we have a film that teenage me was unable to resist. Though Freddy, Jason and Michael rank higher on my list of favorite slasher killers, Scream holds a special place in my heart. This would become the quintessential slasher for me and my generation. It is still, after multiple viewings, a film that I absolutely adore.

    Scream 2 was inevitably going to happen given the enormous success of the first film. And with most of the team returning, the stage was set for a twisted study of the always-maligned 'sequel'. Trying hard to be even more clever than the original, Scream 2 does, at times, feel like it wants to bite off more than it can chew. Yet the final product remains pleasant to watch, and with more than enough tense moments to enjoy, it is still a very good film in my book.

    But by the time we got to Scream 3, a lot of air had again been let out of the '90s slasher balloon. Other slasher series, like I Know What You Did Last Summer and Urban Legend, were already bleeding out, and 'original' series like Halloween and Friday The 13th were making odd choices, if any at all. Neve, meanwhile, seemed hesitant to return, Williamson was gone, the cleverness of the series was turning into parody, and the story perhaps took things several cuts of the knife too far. Mocking Hollywood is one thing, but when you invite Jay and Silent Bob into your Scream film as a cameo, you are definitely not giving it your best anymore. If Carrie Fisher's scene is the best thing in the film for me, even I have to admit that Scream 3 is a letdown. I don't think the film is bad as such, but it's definitely a far cry from the awesomeness of the first film.

    And so, for a while, I figured that Wes's Scream trilogy had closed the books on Ghostface. Then 2011 happened, and Scream 4 was resurrected by Williamson and Craven who were now going after pretty much everything, including the Internet, podcasting and torture porn. Despite the promise of a new trilogy, however, Scream 4 failed to deliver. The film was good but nothing special. It played things far too safe and commented on the YouTube generation but failed to appeal to it. Old wine rebottled, Scream 4 just couldn't get the younger kids on board. I, too, saw little purpose in this film. So the old gang got together again. Oh well. I feared that this was it. And it was, because a few years later, the 'master of horror' (was he ever, though?) and captain of the Scream flagship, passed away. Perhaps his career highs cannot fully compensate for his career lows, but we cannot deny the contributions he made to the horror genre. RIP, Wes. But was it also RIP, Scream?

    Wait long enough, and your own fans become the heirs to the throne. 2022's Scream (5), directed by Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett, injected the series with fresh energy, made the film very topical, yet didn't lose track of the Scream legacy. How would Stu Macher have put it? -- "It was fun!" Yes, fun for the whole family: for veteran fans like myself, as well as for new fans. The 'entitled fan' beware! Scream 5 takes a serious dump on the YouTube comment section and its abrasive users. The best slasher I've seen since 2003's Freddy vs. Jason? Hell, yes! The bar had, admittedly, been low. After the slip-ups of Scream 3 and Scream 4, I wasn't even that eager to watch the film to begin with. But when Jenna "Wednesday" Ortega opened the film with a scene that rivaled Drew's from 1996, and the tone was set for something with deeper impalations, more cuts and more relentless violence, I swiftly realized that this fifth film had put the 'S' back in Slasher. New and old characters unite; and taking notes from the Star Wars playbook, Scream 2022 even recognizes the lesser entries in the series (3 and 4), making the 'universe' tighter and every entry essential viewing. Williamson was clever, but writers Vanderbilt and Busick are at least as "savvy". They recognize that Scream is now over a quarter of a century old, older than Halloween was when its tropes were examined in the '96 film, yet they manage to make Scream relevant again, paying tribute to its legacy while simultaneously building an entirely new and fresh story arc from its own elements. Spearheading this latest journey is the talented Melissa Barrera, who effectively replaces Neve Campbell as the series' it-girl, a spotlight she shares with her in-film sister Jenna Ortega. A strong, energetic and clever fifth film is something few series can hope to have, but Scream manages. And I couldn't be more thrilled.

    So when Scream 6 was released earlier this year, I was so there. And the film did not disappoint. Even more of a continuation of the original legacy, the sixth film examines the "franchise" movement, a frightening subset of the Internet that will organize machete-wielding mobs if you so much as dare to reformulate their darling. Ironically, Scream 6 transfers the series' setting from Woodsboro to New York, and to great effect. With brand new places Ghostface hadn't terrorized before and an entirely new 'big city' dynamic, Scream 6 boldly reinvigorates and refreshes its template. However, the climactic twist results in mixed feelings from yours truly. I was pleased with certain anti-cliché albeit convenient choices, but found the big reveal somewhat dull and, alas, predictable. And yet, if these guys continue their intrepid direction, Scream 7, if it happens, may again treat us to something that defies expectations. I still had a blast with this sixth film; more than anything, I believe that the series is in exceptionally good health. For a long time, I used to believe that the heydays of the slasher, my favorite horror genre, were long gone. The latest two Scream entries, along with more 'elevated' cousins like X and Pearl, give me good hopes that even the deadliest of horror genres can live to kill another day. I'm in slasher heaven.

    Yesterday, I allowed myself a Scream marathon. Did I feel exhausted at the end? Not at all! Twelve hours of whodunit fun with Ghostface killers, film-savvy teens and a tight continuity? To quote Stu once more, "It was fun." I felt 41 and 14 at the same time. Scream is not my favorite scary movie, but the entire series is one of the best slasher series ever in my opinion, now as much a classic as Halloween, Friday and Nightmare. It was a very good marathon day.

    And I didn't scream.

    RANKING
    Scream
    Scream 2022
    Scream 6
    Scream 2
    Scream 4
    Scream 3
  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe "I tolerate this century, but I don't enjoy it."Moderator
    Posts: 13,894
    Wake Of Death (2004)

    This one was a but more lively than The Hard Corps, but oh my lawd the editing was flashy for..... the sake of being flashy? Which is a shame, as it's a pretty good action thriller otherwise, and I get the feeling this is where Van Damme started to push his films down the darker/world wearier characters route, that would lead to the likes of Until Death, 6 Bullets, Assassination Games and Pound Of Flesh (all of which are amongst my favourite JCVD films).
  • mattjoesmattjoes Kicking: Impossible
    Posts: 6,719
    -Leaving Las Vegas
    -Klimt
    -Vivre sa vie
    -Dutchman


    Leaving Las Vegas is a beautiful film. In my opinion, it's uplifting too, despite what others might say. Klimt, directed by my fellow countryman Raúl Ruiz, is an absolute delight in images and sound, and enjoyable in its enigmatic storytelling. Vivre sa vie makes some cool creative choices to tell its story.

    Dutchman is a film adaptation of a play by Amiri Baraka. It's awesome. Directed by Anthony Harvey and scored by John Barry.



    As usual from the maestro, the music is awesome too.

  • Posts: 6,804
    Dredd (2012)
    I was a big fan of the 2000AD comic, ( one of my big regrets in life was chucking out my collection!!) and Judge Dredd was the best character in it. When a movie was announced in 1995, I was thrilled, but the Stallone stinker we got was a huge letdown. Over 20 years before they had another crack at it, but this was a much better film. Scripted by Alex Garland, Karl Urban plays the titular Dredd, with Lena Headey impressive as the villain. This is much closer to the brutal Mega City One depicted the comic. Garland takes a leaf out of the original 'Diehard' and stages the entire movie in a Tower Block, which MaMa (Headey) and her gang lock down when Dredd arrests one of her men, who will end up exposing their drug making empire! Originally released in 3D, hence some of the odd scenes of smoke and water coming at you. Nevertheless this is a much better depiction of Dredds world, than Slys crap effort...And this Dredd doesn't take his helmet off!!
  • Posts: 372
    Dredd is certainly better and Urban is great but for me it still fails to capture the sly humour of the best Dredd comic stories. Also it's budgetary restrictions are plain to see, hence the singular setting. Bit too much like The Raid for me. To do Dredd properly needs a pretty big budget
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    Posts: 8,683
    Tonight:

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    Very good movie, in fact, about a guy trying to take on the Big Three (GM, Ford, Chrysler) in the U.S. automotive industry after the war. Jeff Bridges, Martin Landau, Joan Allen, Christian Slater, Lloyd Bridges...produced by George Lucas, directed by Francis Ford Coppola. Also very decent background info on the BD (ok, doesn't help most of you, it's a German BD, and also the main feature has no subtitles at all, so I admit to not understanding everything that is said during the movie, but hey...it's pretty good anyway).

    Preston Tucker has a dream of producing a better motor car when the war ends. He's a visionary in wanting to equip it with individual wheel suspension, fuel injection, disk brakes, seat belts, and a windshield that pops out when you hit it, basically a safer car than what the others made. He obtains a giant factory in Chicago from the federal government. When he doesn't quite deliver in spite of having collected payments for shares in his company and government subsidies, the SEC - in close connection with the Big Three - closes down his business and has him indicted for fraud. But hey, this movie (as the original facts) ends well for Preston Tucker. And of the only 51 Tucker cars made, George Lucas and Francis Ford Coppola own two each of the 46 surviving ones.

    Good movie, historically interesting. Though no match for certain other Coppola films, neither the Godfather series, nor Apocalypse Now, nor The Conversation. But quite enjoyable.
  • mattjoesmattjoes Kicking: Impossible
    Posts: 6,719
    I saw part of it on TV years ago, one Saturday late at night, probably in the mid-2000s (note to self: watch the whole thing). A foggy memory perhaps, but I remember Jeff Bridges being all smiles in this one, the eternal optimist, until a certain scene in which he lets out his anger at how things aren't working out.
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    edited May 2023 Posts: 2,621
    In honor of the 82nd anniversary of its’ world premiere (May 1, 1941), I watched CITIZEN KANE for about the 50th time! Since I can’t possibly add anything to the mountain of literature that has already been written about this film, I’ll just add that it is – and remains – a surprisingly affecting movie.

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  • Posts: 6,804
    cooperman2 wrote: »
    Dredd is certainly better, and Urban is great but for me it still fails to capture the sly humour of the best Dredd comic stories. Also it's budgetary restrictions are plain to see, hence the singular setting. Bit too much like The Raid for me. To do Dredd properly needs a pretty big budget

    Yes, I agree totally. But Dredd was a big improvement over Stallones effort. We may get a big budget movie in the future, but I doubt it!
  • MalloryMallory Do mosquitoes have friends?
    Posts: 2,056
    I Am Legend (2007)

    It was due a re-watch as I hadn't seen it for quite a while, and it appeared on Prime. It is a good watch but the theatrical ending is far worse than the alternative ending, they should have used that to begin with anyway. I think the alternative ending is the cannon ending (somehow) ahead of the proposed sequel.
  • VenutiusVenutius Yorkshire
    edited May 2023 Posts: 2,925
    Love the idea that Welles basically didn't spend 10 years practicing scales in his bedroom before he played a gig, he went straight out and punk rocked Hollywood because he hadn't been cowed by its conventions and limitations. Excellent. They don't make them like him any more.
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    Posts: 3,985
    Mathis1 wrote: »
    Dredd (2012)
    I was a big fan of the 2000AD comic, ( one of my big regrets in life was chucking out my collection!!) and Judge Dredd was the best character in it. When a movie was announced in 1995, I was thrilled, but the Stallone stinker we got was a huge letdown. Over 20 years before they had another crack at it, but this was a much better film. Scripted by Alex Garland, Karl Urban plays the titular Dredd, with Lena Headey impressive as the villain. This is much closer to the brutal Mega City One depicted the comic. Garland takes a leaf out of the original 'Diehard' and stages the entire movie in a Tower Block, which MaMa (Headey) and her gang lock down when Dredd arrests one of her men, who will end up exposing their drug making empire! Originally released in 3D, hence some of the odd scenes of smoke and water coming at you. Nevertheless this is a much better depiction of Dredds world, than Slys crap effort...And this Dredd doesn't take his helmet off!!

    A cracking film mate. Shame we've yet to get a follow up.

    Like you mate I so regret getting rid of my 2000 AD collection. And so much other stuff as well ☹️
  • edited May 2023 Posts: 6,804
    Mathis1 wrote: »
    Dredd (2012)
    I was a big fan of the 2000AD comic, ( one of my big regrets in life was chucking out my collection!!) and Judge Dredd was the best character in it. When a movie was announced in 1995, I was thrilled, but the Stallone stinker we got was a huge letdown. Over 20 years before they had another crack at it, but this was a much better film. Scripted by Alex Garland, Karl Urban plays the titular Dredd, with Lena Headey impressive as the villain. This is much closer to the brutal Mega City One depicted the comic. Garland takes a leaf out of the original 'Diehard' and stages the entire movie in a Tower Block, which MaMa (Headey) and her gang lock down when Dredd arrests one of her men, who will end up exposing their drug making empire! Originally released in 3D, hence some of the odd scenes of smoke and water coming at you. Nevertheless this is a much better depiction of Dredds world, than Slys crap effort...And this Dredd doesn't take his helmet off!!

    A cracking film mate. Shame we've yet to get a follow up.

    Like you mate I so regret getting rid of my 2000 AD collection. And so much other stuff as well ☹️

    Ah, I hear ye. When I was kid in the 70's I bought loads of new comics, some of which only lasted months. They would of been worth a lot nowadays! My favourite, The Wizard, I had loads of copies! I remember a few years back buying a book which detailed a lot of British comic books. As I was reading it, I was saying "Had that one...and that one, ooh I remember that one!" I had to throw that book out, it was depressing me so much 😭
  • Posts: 5,802
    Pretty much the reaction I had when I visited the Musée de la Bande Dessinée in Brussels, and passing near the retrospective of the magazine Tintin, which I was a subscriber of : "Had it, had that one too. Oh, and this one." I had to throw them away before one of our numerous movings (my father was in the military), and I regret it from time to time.

    So this sunday, I went to see Guardians of the Galaxy vol. 3, and I must say it's the better of the three. In turn funny, moving (there were two scenes which made me cry my eyes out), exciting and horrific. Probably the best Marvel movie since a long time.

    One little thing : during the credits, four people dressed as Ant-Man, Iron Man, Star-Lord and Gamora stepped on the stage and stayed there till the end of the credits. I later saw them outside the theater, posing for pictures. Funny, that.
  • Posts: 15,801
    Finally at long last got to watch this Lana Turner movie.............

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    Well worth the wait and I enjoyed every widescreen frame.

    Here's my review.............

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    Lana-Turner-The-Rains-of-Ranchipur-3.jpg

    Fred MacMurray, Richard Burton and Michael Rennie were all great as well.
    I may have to do a ranking of these films like I do with Bond. This one ticked all the boxes.
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,621
    The Mysterians (1959)
    Directed by Ishirō Honda (May 7th marked 112 years since his birth)
    Starring: Kenji Sahara, Akihiko Hirata, Takashi Shimura, Yumi Shirakawa and Momoko Kōchi
    the-mysterians-md-web.jpg
    The US Release Poster

    Aliens come to Earth to take our land (just three kilometers, or so they say @-) ) and marry our women (the dirty dogs! [-X ). Let the battle commence!
    …and per @ToTheRight, here is my review:
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    maxresdefault.jpg

    s-l1600.jpg

    Upon further review, I think @ToTheRight wins this round by some margin. Still, the film does have the lovely Momoko Kochi (1932 – 1998) in her last sci-fi role for 35 years.
    220px-Momoko_Kochi_540105_Scan10006.JPG
  • Posts: 15,801
    Dwayne wrote: »
    The Mysterians (1959)
    Directed by Ishirō Honda (May 7th marked 112 years since his birth)
    Starring: Kenji Sahara, Akihiko Hirata, Takashi Shimura, Yumi Shirakawa and Momoko Kōchi
    the-mysterians-md-web.jpg
    The US Release Poster

    Aliens come to Earth to take our land (just three kilometers, or so they say @-) ) and marry our women (the dirty dogs! [-X ). Let the battle commence!
    …and per @ToTheRight, here is my review:
    904844394_orig.jpg
    maxresdefault.jpg

    s-l1600.jpg

    Upon further review, I think @ToTheRight wins this round by some margin. Still, the film does have the lovely Momoko Kochi (1932 – 1998) in her last sci-fi role for 35 years.
    220px-Momoko_Kochi_540105_Scan10006.JPG

    Great review, @Dwayne! I think I saw THE MYSTERIANS on television back in the late '80s. I remember it was fun.
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 4,105
    Walking Tall (1973). A fun, yet depressing movie. Some of its messages and themes have gotten worse since it’s release, sadly.
  • Posts: 6,804
    MaxCasino wrote: »
    Walking Tall (1973). A fun, yet depressing movie. Some of its messages and themes have gotten worse since it’s release, sadly.

    Is that the one with Joe Don Baker? Havent seen that for ages!
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 4,105
    Mathis1 wrote: »
    MaxCasino wrote: »
    Walking Tall (1973). A fun, yet depressing movie. Some of its messages and themes have gotten worse since it’s release, sadly.

    Is that the one with Joe Don Baker? Havent seen that for ages!

    Yep. I’m thinking about watching The Rock version. If only to see a pre-fame Cobie Smulders.
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