NTTD & Corona

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Comments

  • edited February 2021 Posts: 16,397
    AstonLotus wrote: »
    Gerard wrote: »
    So do I. I miss going to the movies, or to see a musical or a play or a concert. These are among the things that allow me to get through the day. I long for the day I can return to the theaters safely. But I guess it won't happen this year. Or the next.

    Cinemas are actually the safest places you can be when going out right now ( Even though they are currently closed where i am ).I saw Tenet and WW84 at the theater last year and had a good experience with both.

    The cinema is closed here too now, because a virus has mutated, as they always do. It isn t considered a "necessary service".

    And yet, the so called "Wine Monopoly", the State run strong alcohol sales outlets, are kept open.

    My local cinema is open, and has been for the most part since mid May last year (a week or so in November and most of last month aside). The advantages of living in a smaller town, I guess. There hasn't been many films of interest available to see during that period though.

    Same. The only film I went to between the reopening in May and the reclosing last month, was Tenet.

    Tenet is probably the only noteworthy film during that period. For the most part. my local cinema have shown films that you'd rather watch on a streaming service.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,406
    AstonLotus wrote: »
    Gerard wrote: »
    So do I. I miss going to the movies, or to see a musical or a play or a concert. These are among the things that allow me to get through the day. I long for the day I can return to the theaters safely. But I guess it won't happen this year. Or the next.

    Cinemas are actually the safest places you can be when going out right now ( Even though they are currently closed where i am ).I saw Tenet and WW84 at the theater last year and had a good experience with both.

    The cinema is closed here too now, because a virus has mutated, as they always do. It isn t considered a "necessary service".

    And yet, the so called "Wine Monopoly", the State run strong alcohol sales outlets, are kept open.

    My local cinema is open, and has been for the most part since mid May last year (a week or so in November and most of last month aside). The advantages of living in a smaller town, I guess. There hasn't been many films of interest available to see during that period though.

    Same. The only film I went to between the reopening in May and the reclosing last month, was Tenet.

    Tenet is probably the only noteworthy film during that period. For the most part. my local cinema have shown films that you'd rather watch on a streaming service.

    Same again, but also lots of older films.
  • Posts: 16,397
    AstonLotus wrote: »
    Gerard wrote: »
    So do I. I miss going to the movies, or to see a musical or a play or a concert. These are among the things that allow me to get through the day. I long for the day I can return to the theaters safely. But I guess it won't happen this year. Or the next.

    Cinemas are actually the safest places you can be when going out right now ( Even though they are currently closed where i am ).I saw Tenet and WW84 at the theater last year and had a good experience with both.

    The cinema is closed here too now, because a virus has mutated, as they always do. It isn t considered a "necessary service".

    And yet, the so called "Wine Monopoly", the State run strong alcohol sales outlets, are kept open.

    My local cinema is open, and has been for the most part since mid May last year (a week or so in November and most of last month aside). The advantages of living in a smaller town, I guess. There hasn't been many films of interest available to see during that period though.

    Same. The only film I went to between the reopening in May and the reclosing last month, was Tenet.

    Tenet is probably the only noteworthy film during that period. For the most part. my local cinema have shown films that you'd rather watch on a streaming service.

    Same again, but also lots of older films.

    Very few older films at my cinema unfortunately. That could have made the trip to the cinema a bit more interesting.
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    Posts: 5,150
    I'm glad I didn't risk my life to see Tenet in a theater. It's no Inception.

    Even NTTD doesn't seem worth the risk, even if it were in theaters right now.
  • ResurrectionResurrection Kolkata, India
    Posts: 2,541
    Although i couldn't watch tenet in theaters as they were close at the time but i would gladly watch NTTD in theatre if it release this year. Can't wait whenever it's released :)>-
  • ImpertinentGoonImpertinentGoon Everybody needs a hobby.
    Posts: 1,151
    https://thebulwark.com/its-not-your-fault-your-tv-doesnt-work-right/

    Reason #1 through 14 why some kind of exhibition industry will survive: because most home theatre tech is bullshit that doesn't work the way it should.
  • https://thebulwark.com/its-not-your-fault-your-tv-doesnt-work-right/

    Reason #1 through 14 why some kind of exhibition industry will survive: because most home theatre tech is bullshit that doesn't work the way it should.

    What a load of nonsense.
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 7,248
    It's 100% certain that some kind of exhibition industry will survive.
  • It's 100% certain that some kind of exhibition industry will survive.

    Exactly. It might not be as robust as it was pre-pandemic, but NEWSFLASH, no industry will be.

    That doesn't mean that it's not worthwhile endeavour or that it will henceforth be totally rejected by society.

    Much like how going out to a restaurant hasn't been replaced by delivery apps, cinemagoing will just become a slightly more high-end and occasional option, that hundreds of millions around the world will still enjoy.
  • edited February 2021 Posts: 1,176
    echo wrote: »
    I'm glad I didn't risk my life to see Tenet in a theater. It's no Inception.

    Even NTTD doesn't seem worth the risk, even if it were in theaters right now.

    You risk your life every day when you get up in the morning.

    Its also a bigger risk to go to the shops to buy groceries than it is to sit in a socaily distanced cinema.
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    Posts: 5,150
    Link?
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 7,248
    AstonLotus wrote: »
    echo wrote: »
    I'm glad I didn't risk my life to see Tenet in a theater. It's no Inception.

    Even NTTD doesn't seem worth the risk, even if it were in theaters right now.

    You risk your life every day when you get up in the morning.

    Its also a bigger risk to go to the shops to buy groceries than it is to sit in a socaily distanced cinema.

    True. And with a majority of people wearing masks (which may or may not be the case where you are), the risks of either are pretty slim.

    I wonder if theatres opened one out of every three seats, but charged three times the ticket price for those who still *really* wanted to go to the theaters? Would theatres have fared better?
  • Posts: 1,314
    What your point? people need to buy food to eat so they don’t starve to death. The risk is there possible, but necessary,(although just saying it’s more dangerous doesn’t make it true)

    Sitting in a socially distanced cinema in a mask for 2 hours sounds like a horrible use of an afternoon, and unnecessary.
  • RichardTheBruceRichardTheBruce I'm motivated by my Duty.
    Posts: 10,982
    Well seriously you should try it. With a good movie it just adds to the immersive experience.

    And I haven't noticed folks in theaters talking on cellphones the past year.

  • ResurrectionResurrection Kolkata, India
    Posts: 2,541
    Matt007 wrote: »
    What your point? people need to buy food to eat so they don’t starve to death. The risk is there possible, but necessary,(although just saying it’s more dangerous doesn’t make it true)

    Sitting in a socially distanced cinema in a mask for 2 hours sounds like a horrible use of an afternoon, and unnecessary.

    People who work at theatres are losing their livelihood as well, that's necessary for them. I do my part to contribute to every section of society, which i used to before pandemic. Although, i don't know if we have enough data or stastics, if theatres are actually safe or not, with or without masks.
  • Posts: 3,061
    https://thebulwark.com/its-not-your-fault-your-tv-doesnt-work-right/

    Reason #1 through 14 why some kind of exhibition industry will survive: because most home theatre tech is bullshit that doesn't work the way it should.

    Guees the guy has never heard of home theatre projectors?
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 7,441
    Zekidk wrote: »
    https://thebulwark.com/its-not-your-fault-your-tv-doesnt-work-right/

    Reason #1 through 14 why some kind of exhibition industry will survive: because most home theatre tech is bullshit that doesn't work the way it should.

    Guees the guy has never heard of home theatre projectors?

    I don't think that really solves the problem that is presented in his hypothesis. It's just swapping one tech for another.
  • ImpertinentGoonImpertinentGoon Everybody needs a hobby.
    Posts: 1,151
    Zekidk wrote: »
    https://thebulwark.com/its-not-your-fault-your-tv-doesnt-work-right/

    Reason #1 through 14 why some kind of exhibition industry will survive: because most home theatre tech is bullshit that doesn't work the way it should.

    Guees the guy has never heard of home theatre projectors?

    I don't think that really solves the problem that is presented in his hypothesis. It's just swapping one tech for another.

    I think, the article is pretty over-the-top. I still think it is a good litmus test for a home video system to ask yourself: Is the quality of this set-up high enough, that I don't feel like I am missing out by not going to the theatre? Can someone other than me/the person who set it up turn it on and have it work at a high level?
    For me, personally the answer to #2 is defenitely "No". And in my case it's only the sound that is complicated (well the PlayStation also just sometimes turns itself on randomly), but getting the surround system to work the way it should takes like 5 different buttons on the remote AND the receiver and even then there seem to be some mixes, where the dialogue isn't loud enough or the sound effects too loud and I end up turning the sound up and down all the time. In the end, 90% of the time I just use my TVs onboard speakers, because who cares about the sound quality for "Scrubs"?

    I don't go to the cinema often but I still am absolutely convinced that we are not witnessing "the death of cinemas" because when NTTD or any other movie I am really, really interested in comes out, I just want to sit down in a comfy chair and know that picture and sound are going to be delivered in a good package and I believe a lot of people feel the same way.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 7,441
    Zekidk wrote: »
    https://thebulwark.com/its-not-your-fault-your-tv-doesnt-work-right/

    Reason #1 through 14 why some kind of exhibition industry will survive: because most home theatre tech is bullshit that doesn't work the way it should.

    Guees the guy has never heard of home theatre projectors?

    I don't think that really solves the problem that is presented in his hypothesis. It's just swapping one tech for another.

    I think, the article is pretty over-the-top. I still think it is a good litmus test for a home video system to ask yourself: Is the quality of this set-up high enough, that I don't feel like I am missing out by not going to the theatre? Can someone other than me/the person who set it up turn it on and have it work at a high level?
    For me, personally the answer to #2 is defenitely "No". And in my case it's only the sound that is complicated (well the PlayStation also just sometimes turns itself on randomly), but getting the surround system to work the way it should takes like 5 different buttons on the remote AND the receiver and even then there seem to be some mixes, where the dialogue isn't loud enough or the sound effects too loud and I end up turning the sound up and down all the time. In the end, 90% of the time I just use my TVs onboard speakers, because who cares about the sound quality for "Scrubs"?

    I don't go to the cinema often but I still am absolutely convinced that we are not witnessing "the death of cinemas" because when NTTD or any other movie I am really, really interested in comes out, I just want to sit down in a comfy chair and know that picture and sound are going to be delivered in a good package and I believe a lot of people feel the same way.

    Yeah, I don't necessarily agree with everything in the article, but I think that "the cinema" as an experience will likely never die out entirely anyway (despite the claims that home viewing is the way forward), if only because the shared experience is still immensely popular and can't truly aesthetically be replicated at home for a majority of people, either because of space and/or tech.
  • edited February 2021 Posts: 2,432
    Zekidk wrote: »
    https://thebulwark.com/its-not-your-fault-your-tv-doesnt-work-right/

    Reason #1 through 14 why some kind of exhibition industry will survive: because most home theatre tech is bullshit that doesn't work the way it should.

    Guees the guy has never heard of home theatre projectors?

    I don't think that really solves the problem that is presented in his hypothesis. It's just swapping one tech for another.

    I think, the article is pretty over-the-top. I still think it is a good litmus test for a home video system to ask yourself: Is the quality of this set-up high enough, that I don't feel like I am missing out by not going to the theatre? Can someone other than me/the person who set it up turn it on and have it work at a high level?
    For me, personally the answer to #2 is defenitely "No". And in my case it's only the sound that is complicated (well the PlayStation also just sometimes turns itself on randomly), but getting the surround system to work the way it should takes like 5 different buttons on the remote AND the receiver and even then there seem to be some mixes, where the dialogue isn't loud enough or the sound effects too loud and I end up turning the sound up and down all the time. In the end, 90% of the time I just use my TVs onboard speakers, because who cares about the sound quality for "Scrubs"?

    I don't go to the cinema often but I still am absolutely convinced that we are not witnessing "the death of cinemas" because when NTTD or any other movie I am really, really interested in comes out, I just want to sit down in a comfy chair and know that picture and sound are going to be delivered in a good package and I believe a lot of people feel the same way.

    If you don't like the cinematic wide dynamic range of audio (which Blu-ray excels at - explosions etc. are a LOT louder than people speaking and films are mixed to reflect this) you can apply compression on your AVR, Blu-ray player etc. - Usually just two or three presses of a button - not complicated. They usually come with user manuals too!
  • Posts: 625
    Matt007 wrote: »
    What your point? people need to buy food to eat so they don’t starve to death. The risk is there possible, but necessary,(although just saying it’s more dangerous doesn’t make it true)

    Sitting in a socially distanced cinema in a mask for 2 hours sounds like a horrible use of an afternoon, and unnecessary.

    Here you don't have to keep your mask on while seated. It's like in a restaurant, but without talking and with the best possible air exchange system.
    No other rooms (not shops, not restaurants) have such good air exchange.
    And high ceilings help aswell.
  • edited February 2021 Posts: 1,314
    Matt007 wrote: »
    What your point? people need to buy food to eat so they don’t starve to death. The risk is there possible, but necessary,(although just saying it’s more dangerous doesn’t make it true)

    Sitting in a socially distanced cinema in a mask for 2 hours sounds like a horrible use of an afternoon, and unnecessary.

    People who work at theatres are losing their livelihood as well, that's necessary for them. I do my part to contribute to every section of society, which i used to before pandemic. Although, i don't know if we have enough data or stastics, if theatres are actually safe or not, with or without masks.

    I understand that, but the fact is not every industry can survive a disaster, or a technological advance or whatever.

    When was the last time you went to Blockbuster video. To pick up an physical vhs or dvd. It’s a dated model. Afraid to say cinema is just the same.

    Streaming coupled with the pandemic I’m afraid to say is the death knoll for cinema as we knew it. At least in the medium term. I think it’s going to go the way of music hall, travelling circuses and ballroom dancing. Liked by a niche but abandoned by the masses

    I’m not happy about it just being a realist.
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 7,248
    Matt007 wrote: »
    Matt007 wrote: »
    What your point? people need to buy food to eat so they don’t starve to death. The risk is there possible, but necessary,(although just saying it’s more dangerous doesn’t make it true)

    Sitting in a socially distanced cinema in a mask for 2 hours sounds like a horrible use of an afternoon, and unnecessary.

    People who work at theatres are losing their livelihood as well, that's necessary for them. I do my part to contribute to every section of society, which i used to before pandemic. Although, i don't know if we have enough data or stastics, if theatres are actually safe or not, with or without masks.

    I understand that, but the fact is not every industry can survive a disaster, or a technological advance or whatever.

    When was the last time you went to Blockbuster video. To pick up an physical vhs or dvd. It’s a dated model. Afraid to say cinema is just the same.

    Streaming coupled with the pandemic I’m afraid to say is the death knoll for cinema as we knew it. At least in the medium term. I think it’s going to go the way of music hall, travelling circuses and ballroom dancing. Liked by a niche but abandoned by the masses

    I’m not happy about it just being a realist.

    Yep. Change is painful.
  • Posts: 2,878
    Matt007 wrote: »
    Matt007 wrote: »
    What your point? people need to buy food to eat so they don’t starve to death. The risk is there possible, but necessary,(although just saying it’s more dangerous doesn’t make it true)

    Sitting in a socially distanced cinema in a mask for 2 hours sounds like a horrible use of an afternoon, and unnecessary.

    People who work at theatres are losing their livelihood as well, that's necessary for them. I do my part to contribute to every section of society, which i used to before pandemic. Although, i don't know if we have enough data or stastics, if theatres are actually safe or not, with or without masks.

    I understand that, but the fact is not every industry can survive a disaster, or a technological advance or whatever.

    When was the last time you went to Blockbuster video. To pick up an physical vhs or dvd. It’s a dated model. Afraid to say cinema is just the same.

    Streaming coupled with the pandemic I’m afraid to say is the death knoll for cinema as we knew it. At least in the medium term. I think it’s going to go the way of music hall, travelling circuses and ballroom dancing. Liked by a niche but abandoned by the masses

    I’m not happy about it just being a realist.

    Sad to say this, but I think you are right. The world is quickly taking shape in a new form around us because of this damned virus. Most of it was already in the making before Covid hit, and the only thing it has done is accelerated it by a few years.

    The High Street will be destroyed by this. Large retail shops will only survive online, boutiques will be forced to shut. The only things remaining on the High Street will be the likes of coffee shops and hairdressers. Other than that they will become barren ghost towns.

    A friend of mine works in real estate for office buildings, and he said surprisingly that he had never been so busy. Apparently all his work is now tied up finding large warehouses for the likes of Amazon to house goods before they leave to get shipped off, but his traditional business of finding offices has long gone. Sign of the times.

    As for the hospitality sector, God knows how many will survive. It will be a sad state of affairs if bars and restaurants permanently close, and only an elite few manage to stay open. If this happens, they will be able to charge top dollar for the privilege of eating at their establishment, and will remain fully booked for weeks on end.

    If we are not careful, this could turn the planet back 70 years, to a time after the war when only a few could afford to eat out, or fly anywhere (as a certain Mr Fleming could do, which is why the Bond books became such popular escapist fantasy). Who would have thought we could have come full circle.....


  • edited February 2021 Posts: 3,164


    So just for a bit of realistic context - because I know folks have posted some stuff similar to above here with slightly more 'it's going to 2022' - that doesn't mean UK cinemas will be closed. It means that it'll basically be like last summer when Tenet came out - so same restrictions still in place in terms of audience capacity until the end of the year. But now with the vaccine out there, hopefully, more audience confidence.

    So, much like the last period in between the first and second wave. Will MGM (and not just them but other studios with big films due for a traditional exclusive theatrical release) be okay with releasing into a still somewhat restricted environment? This is where probably looking at the Tenet data will actually bear fruit because - that's done really well in the UK and elsewhere in Europe/Asia given the circumstances. And that's without the vaccine out there.
  • Posts: 2,878
    antovolk wrote: »


    So just for a bit of realistic context - because I know folks have posted some stuff similar to above here with slightly more 'it's going to 2022' - that doesn't mean UK cinemas will be closed. It means that it'll basically be like last summer when Tenet came out - so same restrictions still in place in terms of audience capacity until the end of the year. But now with the vaccine out there, hopefully, more audience confidence.

    So, much like the last period in between the first and second wave. Will MGM (and not just them but other studios with big films due for a traditional exclusive theatrical release) be okay with releasing into a still somewhat restricted environment? This is where probably looking at the Tenet data will actually bear fruit because - that's done really well in the UK and elsewhere in Europe/Asia given the circumstances. And that's without the vaccine out there.

    I can't see MGM releasing this only in countries where cinemas are back open, like the UK may be by October. It will have to be a worldwide theatrical release, which is why I think October is unlikely. It will get pushed back to next year, when hopefully a few more countries are fully vaccinated and cinemas are back open everywhere.
  • edited February 2021 Posts: 3,164
    antovolk wrote: »


    So just for a bit of realistic context - because I know folks have posted some stuff similar to above here with slightly more 'it's going to 2022' - that doesn't mean UK cinemas will be closed. It means that it'll basically be like last summer when Tenet came out - so same restrictions still in place in terms of audience capacity until the end of the year. But now with the vaccine out there, hopefully, more audience confidence.

    So, much like the last period in between the first and second wave. Will MGM (and not just them but other studios with big films due for a traditional exclusive theatrical release) be okay with releasing into a still somewhat restricted environment? This is where probably looking at the Tenet data will actually bear fruit because - that's done really well in the UK and elsewhere in Europe/Asia given the circumstances. And that's without the vaccine out there.

    I can't see MGM releasing this only in countries where cinemas are back open, like the UK may be by October. It will have to be a worldwide theatrical release, which is why I think October is unlikely. It will get pushed back to next year, when hopefully a few more countries are fully vaccinated and cinemas are back open everywhere.

    But thing is - by October looks like cinemas will be back open more or less globally. Still with restrictions, but all the major markets should be open. At the moment only real problematic places are Europe/UK (as they're closed entirely) and then US major metropolitan areas like NY/LA. China, Asia and Australia has already been open and begging for content.

    There's a bit of underestimation with regards to how 'early' hospitality will reopen relative to the vaccine rollout. They won't wait until everyone has been offered the vaccine to start opening up like they did last summer.
  • Posts: 2,878
    antovolk wrote: »
    antovolk wrote: »


    So just for a bit of realistic context - because I know folks have posted some stuff similar to above here with slightly more 'it's going to 2022' - that doesn't mean UK cinemas will be closed. It means that it'll basically be like last summer when Tenet came out - so same restrictions still in place in terms of audience capacity until the end of the year. But now with the vaccine out there, hopefully, more audience confidence.

    So, much like the last period in between the first and second wave. Will MGM (and not just them but other studios with big films due for a traditional exclusive theatrical release) be okay with releasing into a still somewhat restricted environment? This is where probably looking at the Tenet data will actually bear fruit because - that's done really well in the UK and elsewhere in Europe/Asia given the circumstances. And that's without the vaccine out there.

    I can't see MGM releasing this only in countries where cinemas are back open, like the UK may be by October. It will have to be a worldwide theatrical release, which is why I think October is unlikely. It will get pushed back to next year, when hopefully a few more countries are fully vaccinated and cinemas are back open everywhere.

    But thing is - by October looks like cinemas will be back open more or less globally. Still with restrictions, but all the major markets should be open. At the moment only real problematic places are Europe/UK (as they're closed entirely) and then US major metropolitan areas like NY/LA. China, Asia and Australia has already been open and begging for content.

    There's a bit of underestimation with regards to how 'early' hospitality will reopen relative to the vaccine rollout. They won't wait until everyone has been offered the vaccine to start opening up like they did last summer.

    From what I recall, cinemas were open last year when NTTD was supposed to be released, yet MGM still decided to push the release back to this April. I still think this October will be too early for them.
  • Posts: 1,176
    I think they will stick to the October date.Will be released in cinemas and available on PVOD and home media/blu ray about four weeks later given what was reported recently about the new release window for films in the U.K.
  • Posts: 3,164
    antovolk wrote: »
    antovolk wrote: »


    So just for a bit of realistic context - because I know folks have posted some stuff similar to above here with slightly more 'it's going to 2022' - that doesn't mean UK cinemas will be closed. It means that it'll basically be like last summer when Tenet came out - so same restrictions still in place in terms of audience capacity until the end of the year. But now with the vaccine out there, hopefully, more audience confidence.

    So, much like the last period in between the first and second wave. Will MGM (and not just them but other studios with big films due for a traditional exclusive theatrical release) be okay with releasing into a still somewhat restricted environment? This is where probably looking at the Tenet data will actually bear fruit because - that's done really well in the UK and elsewhere in Europe/Asia given the circumstances. And that's without the vaccine out there.

    I can't see MGM releasing this only in countries where cinemas are back open, like the UK may be by October. It will have to be a worldwide theatrical release, which is why I think October is unlikely. It will get pushed back to next year, when hopefully a few more countries are fully vaccinated and cinemas are back open everywhere.

    But thing is - by October looks like cinemas will be back open more or less globally. Still with restrictions, but all the major markets should be open. At the moment only real problematic places are Europe/UK (as they're closed entirely) and then US major metropolitan areas like NY/LA. China, Asia and Australia has already been open and begging for content.

    There's a bit of underestimation with regards to how 'early' hospitality will reopen relative to the vaccine rollout. They won't wait until everyone has been offered the vaccine to start opening up like they did last summer.

    From what I recall, cinemas were open last year when NTTD was supposed to be released, yet MGM still decided to push the release back to this April. I still think this October will be too early for them.

    They actually weren’t! U.K. went into the second lockdown in early November and, more crucially...it was the only big film left standing in that time period by the time it moved.
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