"Play it again, Sam..." - The John Barry Appreciation Thread

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  • edited July 2019 Posts: 17,267
    vzok wrote: »
    vzok wrote: »
    Schifrin did do a re-recording of Bullitt when it looked like the OST was never going to be released on CD. It’s good.

    I just read a bit about the soundtrack; is it the one he made back in 2000 you're thinking of?

    I have the Film Score Monthly release of the actual movie version – which also features the 1968 soundtrack album version. Both of these are great, but I prefer the film version one. I can't be sure if I've ever heard the recording Schifrin made in 2000.

    Yes I think it was released on his own label in 2000

    Definitely need to check that one out. I listen regularly to the two recordings included in the Film Score Monthly release, and I wouldn't mind a third recording!
    mattjoes wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    Mhmm, I'm not sure I understand the question. The re-recordings of the album are just variations on the music Barry composed for the film. He no doubt assembled and conducted the recording of those versions. As for songs, there is a song in the album which is sung by Johnny De Little. Another prominent artist in the album might be organist Alan Haven (who also played the organ on the FRWL main title).

    Ah, my bad. I didn't get you mean re-recordings of the film music; I thought it was re-recordings of music Barry had made elsewhere you meant. Sorry!

    I think I might have a song by Johnny De Little on a compilation vinyl album somewhere. I must check that.


    Re. re-recordings; that makes me think of the Bullitt soundtrack by Lalo Schifrin, which includes alternative recordings of the music heard in the film. I think there was an additional re-recording, but I'm not sure. Anyway, they eventually released the original recording of the score around 2009 or something. I got that one on CD.

    No worries, my friend.

    I didn't know about Bullitt. On a related note, the Dirty Harry film scores had a somewhat belated release as well. At some point there was a compilation album with a selection of cues from the films, but each individual score didn't get an album until Schifrin's own company, Aleph Records, released them.

    The ones I'd really like to see get released are Schifrin's Charley Varrick and Prime Cut.

    Didn't know that about the Dirty Harry scores; it seems like a lot of film music never gets a proper release - at least not around the time of release of the film they're from.

    I don't think I've heard the scores for Charley Varrick and Prime Cut. Are the films any good?
  • edited July 2019 Posts: 6,707
    mattjoes wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    Mhmm, I'm not sure I understand the question. The re-recordings of the album are just variations on the music Barry composed for the film. He no doubt assembled and conducted the recording of those versions. As for songs, there is a song in the album which is sung by Johnny De Little. Another prominent artist in the album might be organist Alan Haven (who also played the organ on the FRWL main title).

    Ah, my bad. I didn't get you mean re-recordings of the film music; I thought it was re-recordings of music Barry had made elsewhere you meant. Sorry!

    I think I might have a song by Johnny De Little on a compilation vinyl album somewhere. I must check that.


    Re. re-recordings; that makes me think of the Bullitt soundtrack by Lalo Schifrin, which includes alternative recordings of the music heard in the film. I think there was an additional re-recording, but I'm not sure. Anyway, they eventually released the original recording of the score around 2009 or something. I got that one on CD.

    No worries, my friend.

    I didn't know about Bullitt. On a related note, the Dirty Harry film scores had a somewhat belated release as well. At some point there was a compilation album with a selection of cues from the films, but each individual score didn't get an album until Schifrin's own company, Aleph Records, released them.

    The ones I'd really like to see get released are Schifrin's Charley Varrick and Prime Cut.

    Didn't know that about the Dirty Harry scores; it seems like a lot of film music never gets a proper release - at least not around the time of release of the film they're from.

    I don't think I've heard the scores for Charley Varrick and Prime Cut. Are the films any good?

    I've only seen the former, and it's terrific. I'm interested to watch the latter in full; I've only seen parts of it but the premise is interesting and crazy, and the music vintage Schifrin awesomeness.
  • edited July 2019 Posts: 17,267
    mattjoes wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    Mhmm, I'm not sure I understand the question. The re-recordings of the album are just variations on the music Barry composed for the film. He no doubt assembled and conducted the recording of those versions. As for songs, there is a song in the album which is sung by Johnny De Little. Another prominent artist in the album might be organist Alan Haven (who also played the organ on the FRWL main title).

    Ah, my bad. I didn't get you mean re-recordings of the film music; I thought it was re-recordings of music Barry had made elsewhere you meant. Sorry!

    I think I might have a song by Johnny De Little on a compilation vinyl album somewhere. I must check that.


    Re. re-recordings; that makes me think of the Bullitt soundtrack by Lalo Schifrin, which includes alternative recordings of the music heard in the film. I think there was an additional re-recording, but I'm not sure. Anyway, they eventually released the original recording of the score around 2009 or something. I got that one on CD.

    No worries, my friend.

    I didn't know about Bullitt. On a related note, the Dirty Harry film scores had a somewhat belated release as well. At some point there was a compilation album with a selection of cues from the films, but each individual score didn't get an album until Schifrin's own company, Aleph Records, released them.

    The ones I'd really like to see get released are Schifrin's Charley Varrick and Prime Cut.

    Didn't know that about the Dirty Harry scores; it seems like a lot of film music never gets a proper release - at least not around the time of release of the film they're from.

    I don't think I've heard the scores for Charley Varrick and Prime Cut. Are the films any good?

    I've only seen the former, and it's terrific. I'm interested to watch the latter in full; I've only seen parts of it but the premise is interesting and crazy, and the music vintage Schifrin awesomeness.

    Watched the trailers for both films last night, and they look like films worth checking out!
  • Posts: 4,023
    Is Prime Cut the Gene Hackman film?
  • edited July 2019 Posts: 17,267
    vzok wrote: »
    Is Prime Cut the Gene Hackman film?

    Yes, it is!
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0069121/
  • edited July 2019 Posts: 6,707
    From Q The Music Show:
    Coming Tuesday 16 July 2000 London Time:

    FULL 20 minute medley from On Her Majesty's Secret Service performed LIVE at Piz Gloria.

    The video re-run will be broadcast "live" at 2000 and then taken down shortly afterwards - don't miss it!

    Video will be shown here:
    http://thelondonshowband.acemlna.com/lt.php?notrack=1&s=dGhlbG9uZG9uc2hvd2JhbmRAaG90bWFpbC5jb20=&i=39A65A7A280

    Features:
    This Never Happened To The Other Fella
    Try
    Ski Chase
    Over And Out
    Battle At Piz Gloria
    Blofeld's Plot
    Gumbold's Safe

    Source and sample video here:
    https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=2368439073411730

    Sounds great! Also nice to see Steven Saltzman at the end.
  • Posts: 6,707
    I've had the Follow Me! theme stuck on my head the whole day. Sounds great whether with the melody on strings or performed by that uncredited duo, Roz and John (supposedly they were playing in a restaurant when Barry noticed them and asked them to sing in his score). Exquisite to listen to. I love the range covered by the backup strings-- not too high, not too low. Picked electric bass, lovely (always preferred the attack of the picked sound to playing it just with the fingers). I also like the addition of xylophone/flute and tambourine in the second half (love how the xylophone/flute notes "fit" inside the tambourine phrase, but don't fully imitate it). Last but not least, that sexy, strange synthesizer in the background. I didn't notice it in full until several listens later. Love those pitch bends. A hint of eroticism that complements the romantic/cathartic feel of the theme. All the elements fit perfectly together, like if we were watching a juggler perfectly balancing a bunch of clubs in the air. Several things going on at the same time, all clearly distinguishable, something interesting always happening.

    While I find the vocal version melancholic, the instrumental is not quite the same for me-- it's more otherwordly than melancholic. Allow me a little rant: every once in a while, when I take a stroll around the city at night, certain places I walk by feel slightly different than the way I remembered them, as if everything in front of me appeared to be in place, but the whole city had been grabbed by a giant crane and placed in another country. I don't know if you understand what I mean, and it's kind of hard to explain in another way, but it's a strange but oddly gratifying feel. This music reminded me of that. It's not happy nor sad, it's the background score of someone noticing something transcendental they'd never seen in before, hidden in plain sight.

    Vocal:


    Instrumental (posted it before but for completeness' sake):
  • Posts: 17,267
    Although I don't necessarily understood the analogy about taking a stroll in the city, I totally see (or hear rather) the differences between the vocal version and the instrumental version, @mattjoes.

    I guess what makes the vocal version melancholic to me, is the tremble in the voices. I'm sort of reminded of the melancholic tremble of Roy Orbison's voice, but also for some reason Jefferson Airplane… Don't know if that makes much sense, but that's what I'm hearing.
  • Posts: 6,707
    I think you're right, @Torgeirtrap. The trembling voices have a great deal to do with that melancholic feeling. I would add the combination of male and female voices, with the male one providing harmony for the female one, also adds to that feeling. There is a certain sadness to it.

    I see the similarity with Jefferson Airplane, at least in a song like White Rabbit.
  • Posts: 6,707
    The Follow Me! score reuses the signature DAF electric organ sound.

    Listen here.
  • Posts: 6,707
    What are your favorite non-Bond Barry compositions? Not albums, not complete film scores, but individual pieces? I just thought of mine. Conveniently, those I rank highest rounded out to five, so my top 5 in chronological order:

    A) "And How to Get It", from The Knack...and How to Get It (1965)

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=K_BzG_eyel4&t=19m57s

    This are several arrangements of this fantastic theme in the soundtrack album (not to mention an extra recording that Barry did of it, and which is available on the Themependium album). I give this one the edge over the others because I like the choice of instruments for playing the A section of the melody, especially at 20:57 in the video, where it is performed by xylophone, pizzicato violins, harp, celli and violas. Great combination of high-pitched percussive sounds and sustained lows. I also really like the exciting organ improvisation by Alan Haven at 21:14. The version of the theme included in the Themependium compilation would be my second favorite. Beautiful music, endlessly elegant in every way.



    B) Theme from The Persuaders! (1971)



    Another very elegant composition, which much like the title sequence of the show, appears to focus on the high life of the protagonists in a very straight-faced way, while not paying much attention to the adventure elements of the show. There is something quirky and subtly tense about the high-pitched synth playing behind the melody, insistently going up and down a semitone. It sounds almost defiant, arrogant. Aristocratic. Incidentally, the shorter, faster version of the theme heard in the intro of the show was released (in mono) on the Music of ITC album.



    C) "Follow, Follow" from Follow Me! (1972)



    I'm just going to quote myself from a previous post.
    mattjoes wrote: »
    I love the range covered by the backup strings-- not too high, not too low. Picked electric bass, lovely (always preferred the attack of the picked sound to playing it just with the fingers). I also like the addition of xylophone/flute and tambourine in the second half (love how the xylophone/flute notes "fit" inside the tambourine phrase, but don't fully imitate it). Last but not least, that sexy, strange synthesizer in the background. I didn't notice it in full until several listens later. Love those pitch bends. A hint of eroticism that complements the romantic/cathartic feel of the theme. All the elements fit perfectly together, like if we were watching a juggler perfectly balancing a bunch of clubs in the air. Several things going on at the same time, all clearly distinguishable, something interesting always happening.



    D) "Candle Light" from Until September (1984)



    Very warm music, though not without a hint of danger and uneasiness in the chord progression-- a typical Barry touch that appers to reflect the intoxicating, overwhelming experience of witnessing great beauty. I love the guitar arpeggios and how the theme "blossoms" at 0:42 after the long introduction. It feels positive and transcendental, thus perfectly capturing the spell of love.



    E) "Did You Call Me" from The Specialist (1994) ('Music from the Motion Picture' album)



    Incredibly sexy and passionate theme. Definitely more lustful than romantic. Impeccable sax by Ronnie Lang and piano improvisation by Michael Lang. I adore that voluptuous phrase played on basses which goes down the chromatic scale. It is heard at 1:05, 1:09, etc. It's like a musical representation of a caress. This is another rendition of the theme that I really like, with those cavernous-sounding strings.



    There are some more lighthearted compositions that would come in the next tier for me, such as Hitch-Hike to Darwin from The Dove (1974) and Valley Chase from The Legend of the Lone Ranger (1981).

    What are your favorite non-Bond Barry compositions?
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    Posts: 8,672
    Full disclosure (and a bit of bragging, I suppose): A look at my collection shows that I own somewhere between 70 and 80 John Barry scores on CD (the exact number depends on whether on counts compilations). While I do have the discs, I also transferred them to a computer as FLAC files and listen to them mostly as part of my soundtrack collection set at random. I'm rather sure I recognise 99 % as being Barry, and may even pinpoint the movie, but I don't know each cue's title...not even from the Bond films. Not counting the actual themes and the like, of course. So while I could definitely whistle along with those four tunes you posted, @mattjoes, I knew the titles only of half of them.

    I have a hard time picking real favourites because there is so much good stuff (same with my Morricone and Williams collection...). I only discovered some gems after really getting into John Barry about ten years ago. But the following is really not a best-of list, only some that weren't mentioned in this thread, AFAIK. In no particular order, but straight from my heart.

    Like this one (along with most of the rest of the score), quite brilliant (and so is Downey in the title role). An unfairly lambasted movie and among my favourites.


    And this is probably the earliest John Barry theme that I remember from my childhood days, over fifty years ago (not knowing the name John Barry until much later):


    The following is not the original recording, but nevertheless one of Barry's most beautiful and melancholic themes IMO. And while I think that DWW is Costner's masterpiece (as opposed to a lot of mediocre stuff), the score is still the best part of it.


    Nuff for now... I may be back.
  • Posts: 4,023
    Main Title / Bogota 1984 - The Specialist

    Main Theme - The Persuaders

    Main Theme - The Ipcress File

    Main Theme - The Lion In Winter

    Romance For Guitar & Orchestra - Deadfall
  • edited November 2019 Posts: 17,267
    It's difficult picking favourite non-Bond Barry compositions, but I think these must be included:


    The Ipcress File - Main Title
    Love the jazzy score of The Ipcress File, and how it fits the tone of the film. It's also a score that's on regular rotation on my Spotify playlists.


    The Persuaders - Main Theme
    This must be one of the best ever TV series themes, right? It's just brilliant.


    The Adventurer - Main Theme
    Another great TV series theme by Barry. Not often mentioned, but I do like to listen to this one.


    The Knack... And How To Get It - Ecstasy
    Lovely score, and I really like this track in particular. I need to watch the film at some point!
  • edited November 2019 Posts: 6,707
    @j_w_pepper
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    Full disclosure (and a bit of bragging, I suppose): A look at my collection shows that I own somewhere between 70 and 80 John Barry scores on CD (the exact number depends on whether on counts compilations).
    Impressive numbers! My own collection is more modest but interestingly enough, I've also decided I don't want to run out of "new" Barry scores to listen to for a long time, so I'm in no rush to go through his entire oeuvre.

    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    I have a hard time picking real favourites because there is so much good stuff (same with my Morricone and Williams collection...).
    Speaking of those composers, I find Morricone is cut from the same cloth as Barry. They often aim for a similar "feeling" in their music, from within their respective styles, of course. And Morricone's filmography is so extensive! Just the other day I was listening to some of his music for a film with Lino Ventura I'd never even heard of, Espion lève-toi. Very nice, with a noirish flugelhorn and those dreamy strings he often includes in his scores.

    I don't care too much for Williams' bombastic scores, I must say. I enjoy Raiders of the Lost Ark, but Star Wars leaves me completely cold. (Blasphemy for others, perhaps, but for instance, that Battle of Hoth music-- ugh. Not for me! Too frantic and far removed from something that could awaken true adrenaline and emotion in me.) I've enjoyed more subtle scores by him, such as Presumed Innocent.

    Good choices for Barry themes there. I love the John Dunbar Theme. On the second half of the film version of the theme, you get these beautiful violin ornaments that totally heighten the emotion. Another great cue from the score would be the theme of Two Socks, the wolf, in both of its renditions.

    The main theme doesn't sound bad with bagpipes, by the way.



    @vzok

    Main Title / Bogota 1984 works perfectly with the images in the film, especially when James Woods throws away the device to disable the bombs and Stallone runs through the bridge. There is a hopelessness in the music. I love this score. Very moody and low-key, but highly engrossing.

    Clever choice with that subtle synthesizer mimicking a piano in the Lion in Winter theme. I love the offbeat brass accents throughout the piece.

    My favorite part of Romance for Guitar and Orchestra is from 7:38 to 8:28 in the video. Great buildup.



    @Torgeirtrap

    I thought of including The Adventurer theme myself, but came to the conclusion I rank it slightly lower. It's a great theme nonetheless. I like the faster pace of the version heard in the opening of the show, so I took the slower single version (which is in stereo, unlike the faster version which has only been released in mono) and sped it up to match the pace of the faster version.

    Ecstacy is likely my second favorite composition from the score. I've always liked how it comes to a halt at 1:53 before coming back to life again. That xylophone that goes back and forth between two notes is a typical Barry touch. This album has great sound quality.

    I've not seen the film either, though I did see a very surreal chase scene from it.



    Do you fellas gravitate more toward early Barry or late Barry (say, from the mid-eighties onwards)? I prefer early Barry, myself. His instrumentation is not as inventive in that later period, and his slower-paced music is a bit less compelling at times. That said, I still find much to enjoy in late Barry scores.
  • edited November 2019 Posts: 17,267
    mattjoes wrote: »
    @Torgeirtrap

    I thought of including The Adventurer theme myself, but came to the conclusion I rank it slightly lower. It's a great theme nonetheless. I like the faster pace of the version heard in the opening of the show, so I took the slower single version (which is in stereo, unlike the faster version which has only been released in mono) and sped it up to match the pace of the faster version.

    Ecstacy is likely my second favorite composition from the score. I've always liked how it comes to a halt at 1:53 before coming back to life again. That xylophone that goes back and forth between two notes is a typical Barry touch. This album has great sound quality.

    I've not seen the film either, though I did see a very surreal chase scene from it.

    @mattjoes

    I've never actually thought about the tempo difference between the one I posted and the one at the opening of The Adventurer, but I agree the opening title version is probably a little bit better. Also, notice the NTTD connection it the opening titles!



    Good point about the halt at 1:53. I like how Barry did stuff like that. It kept things interesting. As for the score, it's definitely a very enjoyable one; I wonder if the film matches the quality of the music!

    mattjoes wrote: »
    Do you fellas gravitate more toward early Barry or late Barry (say, from the mid-eighties onwards)? I prefer early Barry, myself. His instrumentation is not as inventive in that later period, and his slower-paced music is a bit less compelling at times. That said, I still find much to enjoy in late Barry scores.

    It depends on the mood and situation for me. For general listening I prefer early Barry (60's Barry in particular, with The Ipcress File, TB and OHMSS my go-to scores). If I'm working on something on my laptop and I'm in mood for something different, I might find myself picking later Barry – but mostly Bond scores.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    Posts: 8,672
    mattjoes wrote: »
    Just the other day I was listening to some of his music for a film with Lino Ventura I'd never even heard of, Espion lève-toi. Very nice, with a noirish flugelhorn and those dreamy strings he often includes in his scores.
    Unfortunately the CD is out of print. One can buy it on Discogs for a paltry 125 Swiss Francs. Or on amazon.de for EUR 216,27 from a Japanese dealer. Used, of course. There is a number of John Barry scores having a similar fate as well...but even as a fan, I refuse to spend more than 20 or 25 euros for a CD, collector's item or not.
  • Posts: 6,707
    mattjoes wrote: »
    @Torgeirtrap

    I thought of including The Adventurer theme myself, but came to the conclusion I rank it slightly lower. It's a great theme nonetheless. I like the faster pace of the version heard in the opening of the show, so I took the slower single version (which is in stereo, unlike the faster version which has only been released in mono) and sped it up to match the pace of the faster version.

    Ecstacy is likely my second favorite composition from the score. I've always liked how it comes to a halt at 1:53 before coming back to life again. That xylophone that goes back and forth between two notes is a typical Barry touch. This album has great sound quality.

    I've not seen the film either, though I did see a very surreal chase scene from it.

    @mattjoes

    I've never actually thought about the tempo difference between the one I posted and the one at the opening of The Adventurer, but I agree the opening title version is probably a little bit better. Also, notice the NTTD connection it the opening titles!
    At this point I should inform you I'm in complete abstinence from any NTTD-related information, to watch the film in April with as fresh an experience as possible. So luckily for me, I have no idea what connection you're talking about! :))

    I do like the title sequence, though. Gene Barry's punch seems a bit slow however!
  • Posts: 17,267
    mattjoes wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    @Torgeirtrap

    I thought of including The Adventurer theme myself, but came to the conclusion I rank it slightly lower. It's a great theme nonetheless. I like the faster pace of the version heard in the opening of the show, so I took the slower single version (which is in stereo, unlike the faster version which has only been released in mono) and sped it up to match the pace of the faster version.

    Ecstacy is likely my second favorite composition from the score. I've always liked how it comes to a halt at 1:53 before coming back to life again. That xylophone that goes back and forth between two notes is a typical Barry touch. This album has great sound quality.

    I've not seen the film either, though I did see a very surreal chase scene from it.

    @mattjoes

    I've never actually thought about the tempo difference between the one I posted and the one at the opening of The Adventurer, but I agree the opening title version is probably a little bit better. Also, notice the NTTD connection it the opening titles!
    At this point I should inform you I'm in complete abstinence from any NTTD-related information, to watch the film in April with as fresh an experience as possible. So luckily for me, I have no idea what connection you're talking about! :))

    I do like the title sequence, though. Gene Barry's punch seems a bit slow however!

    Nothing spoilery! It's the font, Futura Black – used in the opening titles of The Adventurer and as the basis for the title logo of NTTD :-D

    Barry's punch is definitely a bit slow! It's almost like you could duck away from it!
  • Posts: 6,707
    mattjoes wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    @Torgeirtrap

    I thought of including The Adventurer theme myself, but came to the conclusion I rank it slightly lower. It's a great theme nonetheless. I like the faster pace of the version heard in the opening of the show, so I took the slower single version (which is in stereo, unlike the faster version which has only been released in mono) and sped it up to match the pace of the faster version.

    Ecstacy is likely my second favorite composition from the score. I've always liked how it comes to a halt at 1:53 before coming back to life again. That xylophone that goes back and forth between two notes is a typical Barry touch. This album has great sound quality.

    I've not seen the film either, though I did see a very surreal chase scene from it.

    @mattjoes

    I've never actually thought about the tempo difference between the one I posted and the one at the opening of The Adventurer, but I agree the opening title version is probably a little bit better. Also, notice the NTTD connection it the opening titles!
    At this point I should inform you I'm in complete abstinence from any NTTD-related information, to watch the film in April with as fresh an experience as possible. So luckily for me, I have no idea what connection you're talking about! :))

    I do like the title sequence, though. Gene Barry's punch seems a bit slow however!

    Nothing spoilery! It's the font, Futura Black – used in the opening titles of The Adventurer and as the basis for the title logo of NTTD :-D

    Barry's punch is definitely a bit slow! It's almost like you could duck away from it!

    Oh, @Torgeirtrap, how did I miss that! I really like that font and the logo of NTTD (still haven't taken a good look at the poster, though.)
  • edited November 2019 Posts: 17,267
    mattjoes wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    @Torgeirtrap

    I thought of including The Adventurer theme myself, but came to the conclusion I rank it slightly lower. It's a great theme nonetheless. I like the faster pace of the version heard in the opening of the show, so I took the slower single version (which is in stereo, unlike the faster version which has only been released in mono) and sped it up to match the pace of the faster version.

    Ecstacy is likely my second favorite composition from the score. I've always liked how it comes to a halt at 1:53 before coming back to life again. That xylophone that goes back and forth between two notes is a typical Barry touch. This album has great sound quality.

    I've not seen the film either, though I did see a very surreal chase scene from it.

    @mattjoes

    I've never actually thought about the tempo difference between the one I posted and the one at the opening of The Adventurer, but I agree the opening title version is probably a little bit better. Also, notice the NTTD connection it the opening titles!
    At this point I should inform you I'm in complete abstinence from any NTTD-related information, to watch the film in April with as fresh an experience as possible. So luckily for me, I have no idea what connection you're talking about! :))

    I do like the title sequence, though. Gene Barry's punch seems a bit slow however!

    Nothing spoilery! It's the font, Futura Black – used in the opening titles of The Adventurer and as the basis for the title logo of NTTD :-D

    Barry's punch is definitely a bit slow! It's almost like you could duck away from it!

    Oh, @Torgeirtrap, how did I miss that! I really like that font and the logo of NTTD (still haven't taken a good look at the poster, though.)

    Well, the teaser poster isn't much to talk about really, but I too like the title logo for NTTD. Man in a Suitcase also uses the same font:



    Man in a Suitcase was also filmed at Pinewood Studios – another NTTD/Bond connection.
  • Posts: 6,707
    mattjoes wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    @Torgeirtrap

    I thought of including The Adventurer theme myself, but came to the conclusion I rank it slightly lower. It's a great theme nonetheless. I like the faster pace of the version heard in the opening of the show, so I took the slower single version (which is in stereo, unlike the faster version which has only been released in mono) and sped it up to match the pace of the faster version.

    Ecstacy is likely my second favorite composition from the score. I've always liked how it comes to a halt at 1:53 before coming back to life again. That xylophone that goes back and forth between two notes is a typical Barry touch. This album has great sound quality.

    I've not seen the film either, though I did see a very surreal chase scene from it.

    @mattjoes

    I've never actually thought about the tempo difference between the one I posted and the one at the opening of The Adventurer, but I agree the opening title version is probably a little bit better. Also, notice the NTTD connection it the opening titles!
    At this point I should inform you I'm in complete abstinence from any NTTD-related information, to watch the film in April with as fresh an experience as possible. So luckily for me, I have no idea what connection you're talking about! :))

    I do like the title sequence, though. Gene Barry's punch seems a bit slow however!

    Nothing spoilery! It's the font, Futura Black – used in the opening titles of The Adventurer and as the basis for the title logo of NTTD :-D

    Barry's punch is definitely a bit slow! It's almost like you could duck away from it!

    Oh, @Torgeirtrap, how did I miss that! I really like that font and the logo of NTTD (still haven't taken a good look at the poster, though.)

    Well, the teaser poster isn't much to talk about really, but I too like the title logo for NTTD. Man in a Suitcase also uses the same font:



    Man in a Suitcase was also filmed at Pinewood Studios – another NTTD/Bond connection.

    I'm not familiar with that show but I enjoy the intro.
  • edited December 2019 Posts: 17,267
    mattjoes wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    @Torgeirtrap

    I thought of including The Adventurer theme myself, but came to the conclusion I rank it slightly lower. It's a great theme nonetheless. I like the faster pace of the version heard in the opening of the show, so I took the slower single version (which is in stereo, unlike the faster version which has only been released in mono) and sped it up to match the pace of the faster version.

    Ecstacy is likely my second favorite composition from the score. I've always liked how it comes to a halt at 1:53 before coming back to life again. That xylophone that goes back and forth between two notes is a typical Barry touch. This album has great sound quality.

    I've not seen the film either, though I did see a very surreal chase scene from it.

    @mattjoes

    I've never actually thought about the tempo difference between the one I posted and the one at the opening of The Adventurer, but I agree the opening title version is probably a little bit better. Also, notice the NTTD connection it the opening titles!
    At this point I should inform you I'm in complete abstinence from any NTTD-related information, to watch the film in April with as fresh an experience as possible. So luckily for me, I have no idea what connection you're talking about! :))

    I do like the title sequence, though. Gene Barry's punch seems a bit slow however!

    Nothing spoilery! It's the font, Futura Black – used in the opening titles of The Adventurer and as the basis for the title logo of NTTD :-D

    Barry's punch is definitely a bit slow! It's almost like you could duck away from it!

    Oh, @Torgeirtrap, how did I miss that! I really like that font and the logo of NTTD (still haven't taken a good look at the poster, though.)

    Well, the teaser poster isn't much to talk about really, but I too like the title logo for NTTD. Man in a Suitcase also uses the same font:



    Man in a Suitcase was also filmed at Pinewood Studios – another NTTD/Bond connection.

    I'm not familiar with that show but I enjoy the intro.

    Man in a Suitcase aired for one season during 1967-68 and starred as Richard Bradford as McGill, a former U.S. intelligence agent who's forced out of the agency for something he didn't do, and who spends his time taking on private assignments. I'm in the middle of watching the series myself.
  • Posts: 6,707
    mattjoes wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    @Torgeirtrap

    I thought of including The Adventurer theme myself, but came to the conclusion I rank it slightly lower. It's a great theme nonetheless. I like the faster pace of the version heard in the opening of the show, so I took the slower single version (which is in stereo, unlike the faster version which has only been released in mono) and sped it up to match the pace of the faster version.

    Ecstacy is likely my second favorite composition from the score. I've always liked how it comes to a halt at 1:53 before coming back to life again. That xylophone that goes back and forth between two notes is a typical Barry touch. This album has great sound quality.

    I've not seen the film either, though I did see a very surreal chase scene from it.

    @mattjoes

    I've never actually thought about the tempo difference between the one I posted and the one at the opening of The Adventurer, but I agree the opening title version is probably a little bit better. Also, notice the NTTD connection it the opening titles!
    At this point I should inform you I'm in complete abstinence from any NTTD-related information, to watch the film in April with as fresh an experience as possible. So luckily for me, I have no idea what connection you're talking about! :))

    I do like the title sequence, though. Gene Barry's punch seems a bit slow however!

    Nothing spoilery! It's the font, Futura Black – used in the opening titles of The Adventurer and as the basis for the title logo of NTTD :-D

    Barry's punch is definitely a bit slow! It's almost like you could duck away from it!

    Oh, @Torgeirtrap, how did I miss that! I really like that font and the logo of NTTD (still haven't taken a good look at the poster, though.)

    Well, the teaser poster isn't much to talk about really, but I too like the title logo for NTTD. Man in a Suitcase also uses the same font:



    Man in a Suitcase was also filmed at Pinewood Studios – another NTTD/Bond connection.

    I'm not familiar with that show but I enjoy the intro.

    Man in a Suitcase aired for one season during 1967-68 and starred as Richard Bradford as McGill, a former U.S. intelligence agent who's forced out of the agency for something he didn't do, and who spends his time taking on private assignments. I'm in the middle of watching the series myself.

    Thanks for the info. I see it's an ITC show as well.
  • Posts: 4,023
    All those ITC shows had great opening themes.
  • Posts: 6,707
    I don't know if this has been posted before, but here it goes:



    Barry's impressions of Guy Hamilton, Tom Jones and others are pretty funny. Shame that the interview is so brief. They always seem to focus on the early Bond films. I wish I could hear Barry's thoughts on the later scores.

    Another interesting thing to point out. Barry says:
    "I think Pierce, actually, is the closest in terms of attitude to what Sean was. He's the nearest thing."
  • Posts: 6,707
    The vocal version was posted on page 1. Time to give the instrumental its time to shine.



    I understand it is rumored this was intended to be the main song for OHMSS before We Have All the Time in the World. However, as far as I can tell, this is not confirmed. The book John Barry: The Man with the Midas Touch does not clarify it. The song could have been merely conceived as a B-side for Do You Know How Christmas Trees Are Grown, which is in fact what it was used for.

    Still, very nice. It really sounds like autumn, as the video suggests.
  • Posts: 17,267
    mattjoes wrote: »
    The vocal version was posted on page 1. Time to give the instrumental its time to shine.



    I understand it is rumored this was intended to be the main song for OHMSS before We Have All the Time in the World. However, as far as I can tell, this is not confirmed. The book John Barry: The Man with the Midas Touch does not clarify it. The song could have been merely conceived as a B-side for Do You Know How Christmas Trees Are Grown, which is in fact what it was used for.

    Still, very nice. It really sounds like autumn, as the video suggests.

    A lovely tune this, and one I don't think I've ever heard before!
  • Posts: 6,707
    I'm glad I introduced you to it, @Torgeirtrap (it's been a while since we talked!)

    This is another great piece from the same album.



    IIRC, someone over at the Film Score Monthly forums pointed out it's an unusual one for Barry, in the sense that it seems to lack a "main" melody, that is, one made up from the long phrases that are customary for him. In this case, the violin phrase introduced at the beginning is repeated over and over again, with little variation, with only the mandolins adding some more melodic complexity. It seems to me this is a common approach from Barry for scoring certain types of scenes in films, but it's kind of unusual for an album-only piece.

    Still, very soothing and beautiful.
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,617
    Today (January 30th ) marks ten years since we lost the great John Barry.

    From the “Moviola” (1993) special.

    Part 1:


    Part 2:

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