Last Movie you Watched?

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Comments

  • Unbroken (2014)
    Not bad at all! Hard to sit through at times-- not because of the film quality, but because of the true horrible things that went down. That guy sure went through hell.
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,702
    Murdock wrote: »
    Of course I do. I watched it a few weeks ago. :))

    And you also know that the rape scene was so uncomfortable for her she bailed on the film, forcing the 'she died' comment instead of showing it, eh?
  • MurdockMurdock The minus world
    Posts: 16,339
    chrisisall wrote: »
    Murdock wrote: »
    Of course I do. I watched it a few weeks ago. :))

    And you also know that the rape scene was so uncomfortable for her she bailed on the film, forcing the 'she died' comment instead of showing it, eh?

    Yeah I know about it. But that doesn't stop my enjoyment of the film. I don't watch it for the rape scene. I watch it for BRONSON!
  • edited January 2015 Posts: 4,813
    chrisisall wrote: »
    And you also know that the rape scene was so uncomfortable for her she bailed on the film, forcing the 'she died' comment instead of showing it, eh?
    Was that the 'hey bitch I wanna eat you' woman? :P
    Murdock wrote: »
    I watch it for BRONSON!
    PIERCE BRONSON

    Charles-Bronson-James-Bond--74442_zpsa5dwbi6s.jpg
  • Posts: 1,650
    PRIDE. Entertaining film about the gay community supporting Welsh coal miners in the 80s. As one of the characters says about the improbability of the LGBT community supporting other causes, "How can one ask for equality and support if one is not willing to support others"?
  • MurdockMurdock The minus world
    Posts: 16,339
    @Master_Dahark, A Bond movie with Charles Bronson would be too much for the world to take. The universe would explode! ;)
  • Posts: 2,081
    Batman Begins. It's ridiculous how much I love this.
  • DaltonCraig007DaltonCraig007 They say, "Evil prevails when good men fail to act." What they ought to say is, "Evil prevails."
    Posts: 15,696
    2 Michael Mann movies: 1 rewatch of Collateral and 1 first viewing of The Insider. Both were brillant. Vincent is maybe my favorite role of Tom Cruise, he's cool as ice, and that shootout in the nightclub is simply epic. The Insider was great too, very interesting story and the acting was excellent, especially from Pacino, Crowe and Plummer.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    Cruise surprised me with that one, very atypical. A good and unpredictable film.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,755
    @DaltonCraig007, The Insider is a magnificent film! I feel so bad for Russell Crowe when he trips outside his house while the heavies carry away his stuff. Mann is my hero.
  • DaltonCraig007DaltonCraig007 They say, "Evil prevails when good men fail to act." What they ought to say is, "Evil prevails."
    Posts: 15,696
    Very tough scene to watch, @DarthDimi. You really feel for Crowe there, the FBI guys were total a-holes IMO.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    Maybe it is a requirement for the job.
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,702
    Guardians Of The Galaxy. More fun than adults should be allowed to have. It was a blast & a half. The dialogue was especially hi-larious.
  • ml94ml94 Finland
    Posts: 88
    Surrogates (Bruce Willis 2009).
  • ml94ml94 Finland
    Posts: 88
    Tuulia wrote: »
    Batman Begins. It's ridiculous how much I love this.
    Oletko suomalainen?

  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy My Secret Lair
    Posts: 13,384
    Primeval ! Big Croc film, and the film's a bit of a croc too. :D
  • Posts: 3,336
    The Babadook and John Wick, two very solid films
  • Posts: 1,650
    Boyhood. Nothing terribly remarkable happens in the film. What few crises occur are fairly tame, nothing earth shattering, nothing that will take your breath away.
    It's all very ordinary. We witness the story of a boy growing up from age six to eighteen.
    So what makes this film special? It was filmed over a period of twelve years. We spend a little of each of those years with the main character, until we have witnessed the actor playing him actually grow up before our eyes. The same can be said for the rest of the cast--we literally watch people age.

    As a best picture nominee, I can't say it deserves to win. Honestly, it doesn't matter.
    Good films stand the test of time. They don't need best picture Oscars to prop them up.
    You have to admire the vision and patience of the filmmakers, beginning a film that would finish twelve years later.

  • Posts: 1,650
    Boyhood. Nothing terribly remarkable happens in the film. What few crises occur are fairly tame, nothing earth shattering, nothing that will take your breath away.
    It's all very ordinary. We witness the story of a boy growing up from age six to eighteen.
    So what makes this film special? It was filmed over a period of twelve years. We spend a little of each of those years with the main character, until we have witnessed the actor playing him actually grow up before our eyes. The same can be said for the rest of the cast--we literally watch people age.

    As a best picture nominee, I can't say it deserves to win. Honestly, it doesn't matter.
    Good films stand the test of time. They don't need best picture Oscars to prop them up.
    You have to admire the vision and patience of the filmmakers, beginning a film that would finish twelve years later.

  • Posts: 1,650
    Sorry for the double post.
  • edited January 2015 Posts: 2,081
    ml94 wrote: »
    Tuulia wrote: »
    Batman Begins. It's ridiculous how much I love this.
    Oletko suomalainen?

    Since you ask... yes. :)

    ---

    Just finished watching The Dark Knight Rises. It's never likely to surpass the other two for me. It's not much fun, it's too heavy, too "military". But I can't claim not to like it, just not feeling the near constant "oh my all this awesomeness" of the other two. :P Bruce Wayne's suffering is hard to watch for me in this, and the physical pain inflicted on him made me literally curl up and wince... if it was Keaton or Kilmer or Clooney - or Affleck for that matter - I expect I'd be just regular ho-hum, but it's Bale, so... love him to pieces for one thing, and besides, it successfully looks like it hurts. (Well, ok, some actually really did, hope he doesn't feel it anymore.)

    Some people felt Batman/Bruce Wayne should have been killed off at the end of that trilogy, but I don't agree at all. Considering the general tone of the movie, a happy ending works better, I think. I mean... misery, more misery, and then death? No thanks. The character arc throughout the trilogy is much better this way, too, from becoming Batman in the first place to freeing himself from that, but not ending up in limbo like at the beginning of TDKR, but actually healing mentally enough to find life away from it all. Getting rid of the guilt, pain and anger and finding love and peace, in a way forgiving himself and allowing himself happiness. Besides, what would it say about fighting for justice and defending his city... and then ending up both physically and psychologically ruined, and then just die? No, no, hell no to that. The body got damaged and scarred in the process, but the mind recovered. Not a bad trade-off. Something valuable was actually achieved on a personal level, it was not just the equivalent of banging one's head to wall until the resulting head injury becomes lethal.
    I feel as though Bale had the potential to be even better as Bond than Batman. He was great as Batman, but you either love or hate the voice-- that's really the only negative.

    Something I noticed in a recent viewing of Batman Begins: his 'batvoice' actually progresses from subtle to full on crazy Baleman by the end.

    batman-stapler.png

    When he's wearing the ski mask and threatens Gordon with the stapler ( lol ), his voice is quiet and mysterious, not that different from Keaton's bat voice. It was great.

    batman-begins22-478x288.jpg
    A little bit later, the first night he's in full costume, he has a conversation with Rachel Dawes ('Falcone sent these men to kill you.... You rattled his cage.') and his voice is a happy medium between the previous scene with Gordon and the 'Baleman' from TDK & TDKR. If only he kept his voice like that throughout the whole trilogy, I don't think anyone would have anything bad to say about him in the role.

    maxresdefault.jpg

    Unfortunately, starting with the scene where Batman threatens Flass, his voice takes a turn for the worse and never really recovers. I remember seeing the movie opening night in a packed theater, and feeling uncomfortable an a little embarrassed for Bale.

    Bale's Batvoice has been a topic of debate ever since the first movie came out. On the one hand you think, 'he has to change his voice a lot because Bruce Wayne is such a high profile celebrity'. But on the other hand, can you really picture Batman needing throat lozenges after each night out? I'm not saying he should have copied Kevin Conroy, but you shouldn't bust a gut just saying your lines either, lol

    The stapler is a very nice touch, I think. :P

    I assume the voice changes over time plus changes with his mood.

    In that scene with the stapler it's pretty normal very low, almost whispering voice - but he's not wearing the batsuit, either, so technically that's not Batman, plus obviously he's not angry at Gordon at all, and doesn't need to control urges to kill him or anything.

    Yes, he has to change it not to be recognized, but it is, of course more than that. Batman isn't really simply Bruce Wayne in a batsuit, it's a different character (as Bale saw it, anyway). Batman is the anger, the rage, the beast just barely controlled, but unconcerned about breaking bones and maiming people, partly animal, not entirely human. I think there's that aspect to the voice. It gets more animal/less human at those moments when he's even angrier, as well as (to an extent) over time. Change in the voice into animal direction indicates lessening control over the beast. That's how I see it, anyway. It's part of the intimidation factor, too, I'm sure, but I don't feel like that aspect is the driving force distorting it to that effect, I think it's the rage, the beast.
    I like Keaton's Batman, I grew up with those and the 90's cartoon, but Bale is currently the face of Batman to me, I hope Affleck is good enough to change that.
    The scene where Batman has Flass upside down in the rain (the one that you felt embarrassed for Bale) is the one that really showed me that he IS Batman. I remember almost jumping out of my seat with excitement when Flass said, "I swear to God" and Bale screams "SWEAR TO ME". That's probably my favorite scene out of The Dark Knight Trilogy.
    The only time that I really didn't like the deep voice was at the end of The Dark Knight when he's talking to the Joker. He almost does it a little too much for comfort but other than that I like the voice. It makes him seem like an entirely different person from Bruce Wayne, almost crazy like.
    My cousin and I actually do the voice for fun every once in awhile for mundane things. Our throats never hurt from doing it, granted we don't do it for hours on end but still. So I find the voice believable. Like you said, you either love the voice or you hate it.

    I love the SWEAR TO ME scene, too. :D

    I agree that (this) Batman is quite a different person from Bruce, and very on the edge, so yes, almost crazy like, and Batman doesn't adhere to society's rules and norms and conventions like the billionaire heir Bruce Wayne has to. Bruce says that a guy who dresses up as a bat clearly has issues, and though it's a joke in the context, it's also the truth.

    I think the voice is great. It's the voice of a raging beast just barely reigned in from becoming a killer, from becoming what he's fighting against.
  • ml94ml94 Finland
    Posts: 88
    Tuulia wrote: »
    ml94 wrote: »
    Tuulia wrote: »
    Batman Begins. It's ridiculous how much I love this.
    Oletko suomalainen?

    Since you ask... yes. :)

    ---

    Just finished watching The Dark Knight Rises. It's never likely to surpass the other two for me. It's not much fun, it's too heavy, too "military". But I can't claim not to like it, just not feeling the near constant "oh my all this awesomeness" of the other two. :P Bruce Wayne's suffering is hard to watch for me in this, and the physical pain inflicted on him made me literally curl up and wince... if it was Keaton or Kilmer or Clooney - or Affleck for that matter - I expect I'd be just regular ho-hum, but it's Bale, so... love him to pieces for one thing, and besides, it successfully looks like it hurts. (Well, ok, some actually really did, hope he doesn't feel it anymore.)

    Some people felt Batman/Bruce Wayne should have been killed off at the end of that trilogy, but I don't agree at all. Considering the general tone of the movie, a happy ending works better, I think. I mean... misery, more misery, and then death? No thanks. The character arc throughout the trilogy is much better this way, too, from becoming Batman in the first place to freeing himself from that, but not ending up in limbo like at the beginning of TDKR, but actually healing mentally enough to find life away from it all. Getting rid of the guilt, pain and anger and finding love and peace, in a way forgiving himself and allowing himself happiness. Besides, what would it say about fighting for justice and defending his city... and then ending up both physically and psychologically ruined, and then just die? No, no, hell no to that. The body got damaged and scarred in the process, but the mind recovered. Not a bad trade-off. Something valuable was actually achieved on a personal level, it was not just the equivalent of banging one's head to wall until the resulting head injury becomes lethal.
    I feel as though Bale had the potential to be even better as Bond than Batman. He was great as Batman, but you either love or hate the voice-- that's really the only negative.

    Something I noticed in a recent viewing of Batman Begins: his 'batvoice' actually progresses from subtle to full on crazy Baleman by the end.

    batman-stapler.png

    When he's wearing the ski mask and threatens Gordon with the stapler ( lol ), his voice is quiet and mysterious, not that different from Keaton's bat voice. It was great.

    batman-begins22-478x288.jpg
    A little bit later, the first night he's in full costume, he has a conversation with Rachel Dawes ('Falcone sent these men to kill you.... You rattled his cage.') and his voice is a happy medium between the previous scene with Gordon and the 'Baleman' from TDK & TDKR. If only he kept his voice like that throughout the whole trilogy, I don't think anyone would have anything bad to say about him in the role.

    maxresdefault.jpg

    Unfortunately, starting with the scene where Batman threatens Flass, his voice takes a turn for the worse and never really recovers. I remember seeing the movie opening night in a packed theater, and feeling uncomfortable an a little embarrassed for Bale.

    Bale's Batvoice has been a topic of debate ever since the first movie came out. On the one hand you think, 'he has to change his voice a lot because Bruce Wayne is such a high profile celebrity'. But on the other hand, can you really picture Batman needing throat lozenges after each night out? I'm not saying he should have copied Kevin Conroy, but you shouldn't bust a gut just saying your lines either, lol

    The stapler is a very nice touch, I think. :P

    I assume the voice changes over time plus changes with his mood.

    In that scene with the stapler it's pretty normal very low, almost whispering voice - but he's not wearing the batsuit, either, so technically that's not Batman, plus obviously he's not angry at Gordon at all, and doesn't need to control urges to kill him or anything.

    Yes, he has to change it not to be recognized, but it is, of course more than that. Batman isn't really simply Bruce Wayne in a batsuit, it's a different character (as Bale saw it, anyway). Batman is the anger, the rage, the beast just barely controlled, but unconcerned about breaking bones and maiming people, partly animal, not entirely human. I think there's that aspect to the voice. It gets more animal/less human at those moments when he's even angrier, as well as (to an extent) over time. Change in the voice into animal direction indicates lessening control over the beast. That's how I see it, anyway. It's part of the intimidation factor, too, I'm sure, but I don't feel like that aspect is the driving force distorting it to that effect, I think it's the rage, the beast.
    I like Keaton's Batman, I grew up with those and the 90's cartoon, but Bale is currently the face of Batman to me
  • ml94ml94 Finland
    Posts: 88
    Tuulia wrote: »
    ml94 wrote: »
    Tuulia wrote: »
    Batman Begins. It's ridiculous how much I love this.
    Oletko suomalainen?

    Since you ask... yes. :)

    ---

    Just finished watching The Dark Knight Rises. It's never likely to surpass the other two for me. It's not much fun, it's too heavy, too "military". But I can't claim not to like it, just not feeling the near constant "oh my all this awesomeness" of the other two. :P Bruce Wayne's suffering is hard to watch for me in this, and the physical pain inflicted on him made me literally curl up and wince... if it was Keaton or Kilmer or Clooney - or Affleck for that matter - I expect I'd be just regular ho-hum, but it's Bale, so... love him to pieces for one thing, and besides, it successfully looks like it hurts. (Well, ok, some actually really did, hope he doesn't feel it anymore.)

    Some people felt Batman/Bruce Wayne should have been killed off at the end of that trilogy, but I don't agree at all. Considering the general tone of the movie, a happy ending works better, I think. I mean... misery, more misery, and then death? No thanks. The character arc throughout the trilogy is much better this way, too, from becoming Batman in the first place to freeing himself from that, but not ending up in limbo like at the beginning of TDKR, but actually healing mentally enough to find life away from it all. Getting rid of the guilt, pain and anger and finding love and peace, in a way forgiving himself and allowing himself happiness. Besides, what would it say about fighting for justice and defending his city... and then ending up both physically and psychologically ruined, and then just die? No, no, hell no to that. The body got damaged and scarred in the process, but the mind recovered. Not a bad trade-off. Something valuable was actually achieved on a personal level, it was not just the equivalent of banging one's head to wall until the resulting head injury becomes lethal.
    I feel as though Bale had the potential to be even better as Bond than Batman. He was great as Batman, but you either love or hate the voice-- that's really the only negative.

    Something I noticed in a recent viewing of Batman Begins: his 'batvoice' actually progresses from subtle to full on crazy Baleman by the end.

    batman-stapler.png

    When he's wearing the ski mask and threatens Gordon with the stapler ( lol ), his voice is quiet and mysterious, not that different from Keaton's bat voice. It was great.

    batman-begins22-478x288.jpg
    A little bit later, the first night he's in full costume, he has a conversation with Rachel Dawes ('Falcone sent these men to kill you.... You rattled his cage.') and his voice is a happy medium between the previous scene with Gordon and the 'Baleman' from TDK & TDKR. If only he kept his voice like that throughout the whole trilogy, I don't think anyone would have anything bad to say about him in the role.

    maxresdefault.jpg

    Unfortunately, starting with the scene where Batman threatens Flass, his voice takes a turn for the worse and never really recovers. I remember seeing the movie opening night in a packed theater, and feeling uncomfortable an a little embarrassed for Bale.

    Bale's Batvoice has been a topic of debate ever since the first movie came out. On the one hand you think, 'he has to change his voice a lot because Bruce Wayne is such a high profile celebrity'. But on the other hand, can you really picture Batman needing throat lozenges after each night out? I'm not saying he should have copied Kevin Conroy, but you shouldn't bust a gut just saying your lines either, lol

    The stapler is a very nice touch, I think. :P

    I assume the voice changes over time plus changes with his mood.

    In that scene with the stapler it's pretty normal very low, almost whispering voice - but he's not wearing the batsuit, either, so technically that's not Batman, plus obviously he's not angry at Gordon at all, and doesn't need to control urges to kill him or anything.

    Yes, he has to change it not to be recognized, but it is, of course more than that. Batman isn't really simply Bruce Wayne in a batsuit, it's a different character (as Bale saw it, anyway). Batman is the anger, the rage, the beast just barely controlled, but unconcerned about breaking bones and maiming people, partly animal, not entirely human. I think there's that aspect to the voice. It gets more animal/less human at those moments when he's even angrier, as well as (to an extent) over time. Change in the voice into animal direction indicates lessening control over the beast. That's how I see it, anyway. It's part of the intimidation factor, too, I'm sure, but I don't feel like that aspect is the driving force distorting it to that effect, I think it's the rage, the beast.
    I like Keaton's Batman, I grew up with those and the 90's cartoon, but Bale is currently the face of Batman to me, I hope Affleck is good enough to change that.
    The scene where Batman has Flass upside down in the rain (the one that you felt embarrassed for Bale) is the one that really showed me that he IS Batman. I remember almost jumping out of my seat with excitement when Flass said, "I swear to God" and Bale screams "SWEAR TO ME". That's probably my favorite scene out of The Dark Knight Trilogy.
    The only time that I really didn't like the deep voice was at the end of The Dark Knight when he's talking to the Joker. He almost does it a little too much for comfort but other than that I like the voice. It makes him seem like an entirely different person from Bruce Wayne, almost crazy like.
    My cousin and I actually do the voice for fun every once in awhile for mundane things. Our throats never hurt from doing it, granted we don't do it for hours on end but still. So I find the voice believable. Like you said, you either love the voice or you hate it.

    I love the SWEAR TO ME scene, too. :D

    I agree that (this) Batman is quite a different person from Bruce, and very on the edge, so yes, almost crazy like, and Batman doesn't adhere to society's rules and norms and conventions like the billionaire heir Bruce Wayne has to. Bruce says that a guy who dresses up as a bat clearly has issues, and though it's a joke in the context, it's also the truth.

    I think the voice is great. It's the voice of a raging beast just barely reigned in from becoming a killer, from becoming what he's fighting against.
    Your favourite BOND actor...?
  • doubleoegodoubleoego #LightWork
    Posts: 11,139
    World's end.

    I knew I was going to be entertained but I didn't realise I was going to be enormously so. When things really get going, which is when Simon Pegg is chastising some punk kid in the bar toilet that's when the fun really begins and never let's up. Also, the action/fights in this movie are awesome and something I wasn't expecting to be executed so well.
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,702
    Edge Of Tomorrow (aka Live Die Repeat). I thought it was fascinating. My Son thought it was awesome. My Wife thought it was lacking severely.
    Bottom line for me: Tom's recent Oblivion was a much better sci-fi film, and Groundhog Day was way more emotionally affecting along the same lines, but this movie will appeal GREATLY to gamers & anime freaks. :)>-
  • doubleoegodoubleoego #LightWork
    Posts: 11,139
    Kingsman: the secret service

    9/10

    Great movie and highly recommended.
  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe "I tolerate this century, but I don't enjoy it."Moderator
    Posts: 13,931
    deathwish4.jpg

    Before recently buying the DVD collection, I have only seen parts of this one. Despite Charlie's age, he was still a convincing tough guy in this one.
  • edited January 2015 Posts: 2,081
    CrabKey wrote: »
    Boyhood. Nothing terribly remarkable happens in the film. What few crises occur are fairly tame, nothing earth shattering, nothing that will take your breath away.
    It's all very ordinary. We witness the story of a boy growing up from age six to eighteen.
    So what makes this film special? It was filmed over a period of twelve years. We spend a little of each of those years with the main character, until we have witnessed the actor playing him actually grow up before our eyes. The same can be said for the rest of the cast--we literally watch people age.

    As a best picture nominee, I can't say it deserves to win. Honestly, it doesn't matter.
    Good films stand the test of time. They don't need best picture Oscars to prop them up.
    You have to admire the vision and patience of the filmmakers, beginning a film that would finish twelve years later.

    Hmm. It didn't sound particularly interesting to me to begin with... plus it has Ethan Hawke, which, well... anyway, so I didn't go see it in theatre. I'll catch it on tv or dvd some day...


    Street Kings (2008), starring Keanu Reeves, Forest Whitaker, Hugh Laurie... It was ok, I suppose, but David Ayer has certainly done better work.

    Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005), starring Robert Downey Jr, Val Kilmer, Michelle Monaghan. Started off very promisingly, but not as much fun as I hoped it would be.

    220px-Donnie_Darko_poster.jpg

    Donnie Darko (2001), starring Jake Gyllenhaal. I really like this, it's weird in a good way. :)

    Terminator Salvation (2009). Such a missed opportunity. I actually like it even as it is, but it could have been much better as well. The characters needed more work, for one. Marcus was written pretty well (and I quite liked Sam Worthington in the role), but nobody else was. There was plenty potential story-wise and all, and I would have wanted to see this story continued and explored further.
    No, McG wasn't ready for this, no matter what he said, and Bale was probably kicking himself for eventually relenting and agreeing to it after having said "no" more than once. Seemed to me he was basically just used, and McG mostly wanted him along for his name. (McG pretty much said so, though I'm not sure if he even realized having admitted it.) An unhappy experience for Bale in many ways for sure. Not at all like that other franchise... An intelligent director makes a big difference, and not just with the end result, but the whole process of getting there. (*imagines Nolan swearing and yelling at Bale's face during the making of Batman Begins* ... *giggles at at the absurdity of the idea* ...but anyway IF Nolan were an idiot not trusting his actors... *imagines Bale not contacting Nolan about Alfred Borden* ;) Oh McG, you moron...)
    It's interesting that the box office numbers for this were almost the same as for Batman Begins... though this one cost 50 million dollars more, of course... which is kinda ridiculous, really... and why anyone would give that kind of money to someone like McG to use... the mind boggles.
    I wonder what kind of contract Bale had and what would have happened if TS had been more successful and they had wanted to continue... with the same director. Somehow I can't imagine he would have definitely committed to more than one movie here (- Batman was a whole different scenario to begin with in practically every way). When Bale said in a recent interview - nicely, but clearly - that he wouldn't be working with McG again, I wasn't at all surprised he wouldn't, but that he actually said so, and what he implied in how he said it. I was thinking "in-te-rest-ing... of course you wouldn't, but is that because of a, b, c, or d...?" Naturally he's unlikely to elaborate further.

    And what a pity the 5th installment of this franchise looks so bloody awful. :(

  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,702
    Steamboy. Pretty cool, but like Otomo's Akira kind of a strange tale. Visually impressive though.
  • DaltonCraig007DaltonCraig007 They say, "Evil prevails when good men fail to act." What they ought to say is, "Evil prevails."
    Posts: 15,696
    Finally managed to rewatch the 4 Transformers films.

    The first one is pretty good. Some of the action scenes are simply excuses to blow up everything around, but it's fun. Soundtrack is epic, but I don't like all the nonsense between Sam and the Mikeala, although she is very pretty.

    The 2nd one is conflicting. It takes a while for the story to get moving, and it features some very cringe worthy humour - when the mom eats the spacecake and goes crazy, and when Sam goes bonkers in the classroom. But then you get the whole end sequence in Egypt, which I just love, it's simply epic.

    The third one has less cringe worthy humour and has a wide scope, but they seem to have crammed up all the big action for the end battle, so it does slow down in the middle, and the big battle, while epic, is a bit too much.

    The fourth one is a change of style, a bit more serious while keeping the childishness of Bay. I am a big fan of Mark Whalberg so he was fun, and the whole sequence in China is awesome. It's the longest of the 4 so there are some less exciting moment like the whole 'search the daughter' sequence aboard the huge spaceship. The CGI has gone a long way since the 1st one.
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