Complete and Detailed Bond Movie Ranking

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Comments

  • I feel like quite a bit of justification will be needed for SP, just a warning that it might be lengthy! (oh, and QoS, TND, maybe DN and SF as well)
  • ProfJoeButcherProfJoeButcher Bless your heart
    edited September 2021 Posts: 1,696
    I feel like quite a bit of justification will be needed for SP, just a warning that it might be lengthy! (oh, and QoS, TND, maybe DN and SF as well)

    Hey, the only thing I love more than Spectre is long posts about why Spectre is great. But don't forget your trigger warning!
  • I feel like quite a bit of justification will be needed for SP, just a warning that it might be lengthy! (oh, and QoS, TND, maybe DN and SF as well)

    Hey, the only thing I love more than Spectre is long posts about why Spectre is great. But don't forget your trigger warning!

    I won't forget it
  • silva13silva13 Australia
    Posts: 198
    @Thunderfinger fantastic ranking, I'm loving the love for AVTAK and DAD!
  • Posts: 15,906
    25.THE WORLD IS NOT ENOUGH
    There were some rumours in the press beforehand that Bond would have to attend Qs funeral in this, and needed psychological help thereafter. Glad that didn t happen .Strangely prophetic, though.
    .

    I have a feeling if that had been the Craig era, though rumors would've turned out true.
    Excellent ranking. :)
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    silva13 wrote: »
    @Thunderfinger fantastic ranking, I'm loving the love for AVTAK and DAD!

    I was surprised by how much I enjoyed them last time around.
    ToTheRight wrote: »
    25.THE WORLD IS NOT ENOUGH
    There were some rumours in the press beforehand that Bond would have to attend Qs funeral in this, and needed psychological help thereafter. Glad that didn t happen .Strangely prophetic, though.
    .

    I have a feeling if that had been the Craig era, though rumors would've turned out true.
    Excellent ranking. :)

    He! Good point.
  • edited September 2021 Posts: 508
    008. SKYFALL
    This is a cinematographic masterpiece, it tells a very good story, and the pacing is good. In actual fact it ticks all the boxes. It's near perfect except from a couple of plot holes and the implausibility of Bond surviving after the PTS. I don't really have anything else to say about SF. Objectively it should probably be higher, but subjectively I prefer some others.

    007. OCTOPUSSY
    There's a lot of love for this one on this forum and I'm glad to see that. It has just the right balance of dark moments (mostly to do with the Dexter-Smythe plotline from the short story) and funny, OTT moments. It's almost Moonraker re-done with a Cold War plotline, which works very well. Every time I see the Cuban opening, I'm just down to watch this film. The action sequences are well-choreographed, the suspense is tangible, the auction at Sotherby's is classic Fleming...there's just so much to love in this film. Perhaps my main issue with the film is that with so many different plot threads going on, it can be difficult to follow, but I don't really care because it's simply a fun romp.

    006. FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE
    The most faithful to the Fleming material, and it shows. This, along with TLD are the only true spy thrillers in the franchise. This is probably a very controversial opinion, but I prefer the first two Connerys over the rest because they aren't yet bogged down by trying to tick all the boxes for the formula. I feel like the ones up until this point and the next one are all objective, and then the top 4 are my subjective favourites. Weird how that's happened.

    005. THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS
    I understand the criticisms about this having a weak climax etc. etc. but I disagree about the film having weak villains. Whilst they aren't the strongest villains, I feel they fit the tone of the film, and I think the portrayal of Koskov is actually very good. The only reason this is as "low" as this is because I understand that the final fight between Bond and Whittaker is campy, and quite weak. The PTS is great, the sniper scene is great, I like the cello scene however OTT it is, the location of Austria is brilliant. And the fight with Necros on the plane is very inventive!

    004. SPECTRE
    ok, so as requested, this is going to be quite a long-winded explanation of my love for SPECTRE, as it requires more justification than the previous ones in my top 008 did.

    A lot of people judge the films just as a whole and forget the little moments. I think this is crucial in understanding SPECTRE. The first memorable moment is when Craig walks along the bannister at The Day of the Dead Festival with Newman's score (excellent at this particular moment) playing. This isn't just a great moment, but it also parallels one of my favourite moments in QoS where he walks along the bannister at the hotel with Arnold's score in the background. I love both of these moments. There are quite a few of these little moments in SPECTRE where I just think "this is BOND". The scene with Mr White is just so well-done. I love the atmospheric presence in that scene. "You are a kite flying in a hurricane Mr Bond". This also brings some sort of closure to Mr White's character arc, which I find brilliant.

    The Rome scenes are actually well-executed as well. I understand the annoyance at Lucia Sciarra not having enough screen-time, but for me personally, it's the quality of the character that matters, not the screen-time (as with Severine in SF). The boardroom scene is shot like a classic boardroom scene, and I'm really hyped for the fact that NTTD is set to have one too.

    Then there is the hate directed at the Rome car chase, but the thing is, this car chase wasn't designed to be an action scene really, it was designed to bring some comic relief (particularly with the Fiat at the start). I don't understand what people don't understand about it.

    Another point I've heard is "why were there barely any guards protecting Blofeld's headquarters?" But I would have thought this was obvious too; Blofeld wants his headquarters to be hidden, and surely lots of guards would attract unwanted attention?

    My final point about SPECTRE is going to be about the much derided final act. So to start off with, we have the larger involvement of MI6 regulars in this, but I see this as a positive e.g. I love that Q was out in the field in LTK, that part of that film was brilliant! It's the same for me here, I don't know why people see this as a negative. Next it's all the faces that Bond sees at the end of the film, but I like this too, even if it is pretentious, as it ties all the films together neatly, and also reflects Blofeld's line of dialogue: "My wounds will heal, but what about yours?" It also parallels the moment in the title sequence when we see a flashback of Vesper. I just think the parallels are well-done. And finally we have the fact that Bond shoots down Blofeld's helicopter with 11 shots from a Walther, and this is where I must stop defending this film. This is why it isn't second or third. Because this is very unrealistic and the fact that Bond not killing Blofeld was purely a financial decision.

    The last thing is I very commonly hear this film called "bloated". But in that case what many people think of as bloated, I think of as well-rounded.

    I'm sorry that my ranking of Spectre might not be what you were expecting but I devoted this relatively long review to answering some common queries about the film.

    003. QUANTUM OF SOLACE
    This might seem a strangely high placement of QoS considering my last point about SP but the short length fits the tone of the film. It feels like a revenge film. I'm happy that there's love for Quantum on this forum because it doesn't get much love from casual fans. I don't really see a lot wrong with this film so I would just like to point out one thing about it.

    The water plot which many people call "boring" is actually disturbingly futuristic.

    That is literally all I have to say about QoS. Whether it's nostalgia or it just being objectively good I don't know, but I love every moment of this film (except for Strawberry Fields of course).

    I will post the final two later, my fingers ache.
  • Having read part of your ranking @silva13, I agree with a lot of your sentiments on TND and DAD. I will get round to reading the rest of your ranking in a bit.
  • Also love the fact that people are ranking DAD quite highly, I wish I had put it higher now! The action scenes are fun and there's so much to like about it
  • silva13silva13 Australia
    Posts: 198
    @Quantum_of_Tomorrow enjoying your ranking thoroughly, especially your thoughts on SP.
  • silva13 wrote: »
    @Quantum_of_Tomorrow enjoying your ranking thoroughly, especially your thoughts on SP.

    Thanks, I feel like too often people just jump on the SP-hating bandwagon so I wanted to post my view on some common criticisms of the film.
  • silva13silva13 Australia
    Posts: 198
    silva13 wrote: »
    @Quantum_of_Tomorrow enjoying your ranking thoroughly, especially your thoughts on SP.

    Thanks, I feel like too often people just jump on the SP-hating bandwagon so I wanted to post my view on some common criticisms of the film.

    I think there is a near perfect bond film in there! I wish there was a presence of men hiding in the abandoned MI6 at the end instead of pictures. That's really my only problem with it!
  • 002. DR. NO
    Interestingly not many people have DN as their favourite Connery, but I just get this thrilling feeling when watching the film. It's the original, it wasn't bogged down by the formula established in the next two films, and it has this sense of freedom. It's much simpler than FRWL, and there isn't a lot of substance to the film, it's just an enjoyable way of spending 2 hours. I think this sense of freedom (reminds me of that term in music theory rubato) is why I rank DN this highly.

    001. TOMORROW NEVER DIES
    Speaking of enjoyable ways to spend 2 hours...this is by far the most entertaining Bond film. Is it the most Bondian? No. But it doesn't need to be. It's got enough Bondian elements (the moment where Bond is in his room and drinking shots and putting a silencer on his gun is just so atmospheric and tense!) to make it feel like a Bond film in my opinion, but the great gift of the Bond films is being able to adapt to the times. This is quite obviously, a 90's action film, but I think it still feels quite Bondian. Dr Kaufmann is brilliant, I like the car chase in the garage. The much derided Elliot Carver is great, because instead of the usual "Bond goes to the villain's hideout" we get this media mogul trying to be as well-known as possible. It shakes up the formula whilst also being, in my opinion, the quintessential Bond film. It delivers in the action department, the villain is great, Brosnan gives a good performance (only surpassed by his performance in DAD), and Michelle Yeoh is a good, competent Bond girl. Arnold's score is PHENOMENAL. If I could put any film in after a bad day at school/work, it would surely be this. It's a mood-lifter.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    002. DR. NO
    Interestingly not many people have DN as their favourite Connery, but I just get this thrilling feeling when watching the film. It's the original, it wasn't bogged down by the formula established in the next two films, and it has this sense of freedom. It's much simpler than FRWL, and there isn't a lot of substance to the film, it's just an enjoyable way of spending 2 hours. I think this sense of freedom (reminds me of that term in music theory rubato) is why I rank DN this highly.

    001. TOMORROW NEVER DIES
    Speaking of enjoyable ways to spend 2 hours...this is by far the most entertaining Bond film. Is it the most Bondian? No. But it doesn't need to be. It's got enough Bondian elements (the moment where Bond is in his room and drinking shots and putting a silencer on his gun is just so atmospheric and tense!) to make it feel like a Bond film in my opinion, but the great gift of the Bond films is being able to adapt to the times. This is quite obviously, a 90's action film, but I think it still feels quite Bondian. Dr Kaufmann is brilliant, I like the car chase in the garage. The much derided Elliot Carver is great, because instead of the usual "Bond goes to the villain's hideout" we get this media mogul trying to be as well-known as possible. It shakes up the formula whilst also being, in my opinion, the quintessential Bond film. It delivers in the action department, the villain is great, Brosnan gives a good performance (only surpassed by his performance in DAD), and Michelle Yeoh is a good, competent Bond girl. Arnold's score is PHENOMENAL. If I could put any film in after a bad day at school/work, it would surely be this. It's a mood-lifter.
    @chrisisall , check it out.
  • Junglist_1985Junglist_1985 Los Angeles
    edited September 2021 Posts: 1,007
    Really enjoyed your rankings! Great to see the love for QOS, TND, TLD, and yes even SP.

    I keep telling myself… If Spectre were the top-tier film it COULD have been, Craig would have retired and we wouldn’t have NTTD. For that, I am extremely thankful.
  • silva13silva13 Australia
    Posts: 198
    002. DR. NO
    Interestingly not many people have DN as their favourite Connery, but I just get this thrilling feeling when watching the film. It's the original, it wasn't bogged down by the formula established in the next two films, and it has this sense of freedom. It's much simpler than FRWL, and there isn't a lot of substance to the film, it's just an enjoyable way of spending 2 hours. I think this sense of freedom (reminds me of that term in music theory rubato) is why I rank DN this highly.

    001. TOMORROW NEVER DIES
    Speaking of enjoyable ways to spend 2 hours...this is by far the most entertaining Bond film. Is it the most Bondian? No. But it doesn't need to be. It's got enough Bondian elements (the moment where Bond is in his room and drinking shots and putting a silencer on his gun is just so atmospheric and tense!) to make it feel like a Bond film in my opinion, but the great gift of the Bond films is being able to adapt to the times. This is quite obviously, a 90's action film, but I think it still feels quite Bondian. Dr Kaufmann is brilliant, I like the car chase in the garage. The much derided Elliot Carver is great, because instead of the usual "Bond goes to the villain's hideout" we get this media mogul trying to be as well-known as possible. It shakes up the formula whilst also being, in my opinion, the quintessential Bond film. It delivers in the action department, the villain is great, Brosnan gives a good performance (only surpassed by his performance in DAD), and Michelle Yeoh is a good, competent Bond girl. Arnold's score is PHENOMENAL. If I could put any film in after a bad day at school/work, it would surely be this. It's a mood-lifter.

    Beautiful summary of TND! It is definitely my go to bond film when i need to be cheered up!
  • Posts: 2,400
    #25: DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER (1971)

    Utter crap. Never Say Never Again is better than this and CR '67 might even give it a run for its money. Easily the worst Bond performance of the entire franchise and its villain and Bond girls are down there, too. The action sequences would be laughably bad if they weren't so dull. They dedicate an entire ten seconds of screentime TO AN ELEPHANT PLAYING SLOTS, WINNING WITH THREE ELEPHANT SYMBOLS, AND TRUMPETING. Vegas is just a trashy place that they inexplicably decided to film in not only at the peak of its trashiness, but in the seediest, trashiest parts (that scene at the gas station is peak Vegas... or trough Vegas, depending on your point of view). The climax on the oil rig is embarrassing, and the decision to ignore OHMSS is arguably the single worst creative decision and biggest missed opportunity in the history of Bond. I have pretty much nothing positive to say about this movie except that it does, mercifully, end. the theme song is marvelous, but much of Barry's score is a disappointing rehash at best and awful at worst. 0.5/10

    #24: DIE ANOTHER DAY (2002)

    No. 1/10

    #23: THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN GUN (1974)

    Yes, we should always rush-produce and release Bond films and, after we pull off the greatest stunt ever done with a car, add a slide whistle in for good measure. Honestly, what was Barry smoking in the early 70s and can I have some? 1/10

    #22: SPECTRE (2015)

    Craig is great as usual in this, save for a couple of odd performance choices (he goes a little too "big" when demanding that Blofeld shut off the monitors, for example), but he's largely let down by what surrounds him. Mendes overvalued the positive reviews of the new MI-6 gang, as he proceeds to not only wildly overuse them, but use them in the wrong ways. M should never be part of a fight scene unless Bond is there with him/her. He/she is the head of the bloody British secret service for God's sake, he/she should almost always be parked behind a desk. I think often about the scene in episode 1x11 of The Sopranos, where Tony has just learned that Big Pussy is a rat and wants to be the one to whack him, but Paulie vetoes him: "You waited a long time for the stripes. This is one of the perks." M is Tony Soprano and Bond is Paulie, which means STAY IN YOUR GODDAMNED OFFICE MALLORY AND LET BOND THROW ANDREW SCOTT OFF A BALCONY. A lot of the action feels very flat and like it's going through the motions; I thought the plane sequence was absolutely top-notch on first viewing, but it feels very lethargic and even kind of nonsensical on repeat. The opening oner is terrific but the fight in the helicopter is a bit bland, same with the car chase in Rome, it just never really reaches a good crescendo. I'd say the fight with Hinx is easily the one really good fight, but it also feels like a half-baked version of the fight on the train against Jaws. It also turns around out of nowhere. I mean Bond is getting his ass kicked during pretty much the entirety of the thing and then all of a sudden he has the kegs flying out of the train and has won. Brofeld is so goddamned stupid and the whole thing about Blofeld threatening to destroy Bond's brain or whatever, doing it, and then Bond is completely fine despite the needle having gone into his head, is worse than the mess DAF makes with Plenty O'Toole. Honestly they could've fixed this by having Blofeld JUST BE BLOFELD from the start, and the reason he's become pissed at Bond is because in CR/QoS Bond ruined a huge plan of Quantum's and therefore SPECTRE. We've known Blofeld to deeply value the success of his plans before, and we've known SPECTRE to hold a grudge against Bond for taking out their assets as well. Everything from that point on til the end of the film can pretty much die in a fire, too. 3/10

    #21: A VIEW TO A KILL (1985)

    Stay for Grace Jones, avert your eyes whenever fresh-from-the-facelift Roger Moore gets a close-up and prepare to be disappointed by one of Christopher Walken's weakest performances (his work in At Close Range the year after is like night and day next to Zorin) and an abysmal Bond girl. "JAAAAAAAAAAAAMES!" Really nothing special to report about any action sequence here, and I have always hated the fire truck chase with the Keystone Kops. Even Paris is pretty dull after so many viewings, an entire segment of the film that happens for no reason other than to give us an action sequence which I don't think any other scene in the series is so blatantly guilty of. "JAAAAAAMES!" 4/10

    I'll continue this another time soon, it's exhausting to talk about these bottom five.
  • royale65royale65 Caustic misanthrope reporting for duty.
    Posts: 4,422
    After having seen No Time to Die 3 times in the cinema, I feel confident in ranking it. Prior to seeing that film, however, I delved into a Bondathon, chronologically, naturally.

    Going through the Bond movies in that order, had some… insights. For example, I missed Sean Connery’s presence in Majesty’s; the way that Spy embraced being a Bond film, after the lackadaisical efforts of the Hamilton trio; FYEO being a welcome return to form after the inanity of Moonraker; TLD reinvigorating the series after AVTAK and the shot in the arm of Casino Royale.

    25. Die Another Day, 2002.
    It is a shame that Pierce Brosnan truly nails the character of James Bond, having a real ownership to the role, in this movie. The first half or so, moves at a fair clip, having some fantastic moments, yet it soon descends into a pastiche of a Bond film. Hammy acting, a tired script, some painful one liners and some less than stellar CGI, mar this high octane action adventure.

    24. The Man with the Golden Gun, 1974.
    Bizarre situations and a tepid screenplay mar this ninth Bond adventure. Roger Moore improves on his performance in Live and Let Die, giving a more terse interpretation. The films greatest asset is Christopher Lee as the titular villain, presenting a dark side of Bond. This was the last film for Ted Moore as cinematographer – his duties are shared with Oswald Morris after Moore took ill - Guy Hamilton as director, Tom Mankiewicz as writer and Harry Saltzman as producer.

    23. Diamonds are Forever, 1971.
    The presence of Sean Connery is welcome in this light and breezy episode. John Barry is, of course, up to his usual high standards, and Shirley Bassey returns to herald the second coming of Connery in the title track. The trend of overt humour is a step in the wrong direction for the Bond movies, but Tom Mankiewicz’s script sparkles.

    22. A View to a Kill, 1985.
    The fascinating and oddball duo of Christopher Walken and Grace Jones steal the show. The film also benefits from a fine John Barry score. However silly humour and a poor screenplay undermine this effort. An unworthy way to say goodbye to Sir Roger Moore.

    21. Moonraker, 1979.
    The sight gags and overt humour blight what could have been a terrific entry in the series. Regardless, Moonraker is a production treat, with winning contributions from John Barry, the entire visual effects team, and, in his last hurrah, Ken Adam as Production Designer.

    20. You Only Live Twice, 1967.
    A triumph in production values – the sets, the music and the cinematography are all second to none. The plot, however, is rather far fetched and quota of gadgetry reaches an all time high for the Connery era. Sean Connery is perhaps too laconic, while Donald Pleasence does not quite live up to expectations in Blofeld’s first, visible, on screen appearance, yet the other main cast members are truly great, especially Tetsuro Tamba as Tiger Tanaka.

    19. Live and Let Die, 1973.
    Cleverly written, Live and Let Die, contains some delicious humour, but the overt trend continues from Diamonds Are Forever, yet the plot is cunning in its simplicity. Roger Moore successfully establishes himself as James Bond. The heavies are particularly fine and Jane Seymour makes an impression as Solitiare.

    18. GoldenEye, 1995.
    In his first appearance, Pierce Brosnan impresses as 007. GoldenEye has a terrific cast, most notably Sean Bean as Trevelyan. The first of the post Cold War Bond films, the script ask Bond to validate himself, something he does with aplomb. Other highlights include many exciting actions scenes and great stunt work.

    17. Tomorrow Never Dies, 1997.
    This is a stylish, sleek, hi-tech adventure for Commander Bond. Brosnan is well paired with the always classy Michelle Yeoh’s Wai Lin, probably Bond’s finest comrade in arms. The first two thirds of the picture is particularly good, before action fatigue hits in in the final third. Also of note, is the debut of David Arnold in the composers chair – a fine effort all around. This was the first Bond movie without Cubby Broccoli, who passed away in 1996.

    16. The World is Not Enough, 1999.
    Trying to be an emotional thriller, TWINE sets its sights high, but is lacking in the execution. Yet, all the hallmarks of the formula are present, and in novel fashion. Pierce Brosnan is, for the most part, great value in his third attempt, yet the more emotional storyline exposes Brosnan’s foibles. The true standout of the picture is the villainous Elektra King, played with extreme relish by the gorgeous Sophie Marceau. She morphs from a winged dove, so favoured by Ian Fleming, into a megalomaniacal miscreant, with severe daddy issues.

    15. Spectre, 2015.
    In this, his fourth James Bond film, Daniel Craig is magnificent as the incomparable 007, being insouciant, charming and very dangerous, all leavened with a wry humour. His Bond is a self assured Bond, that learnt his lessons from the past three films – inner calm, tempered by his experiences. The screenplay is rather erratic from the SPECTRE lair onwards, particularly the B-Plot involving the MI6 regulars, and the less said about the Brofeld debacle the better, but the script, the cast and the sheer sense of Bondian fun compensates, somewhat.

    14. Octopussy, 1983.
    The fantastic splendour of India makes for a memorable backdrop to this most underrated gem. The screenplay is involving and intriguing and contains some inventive action. The cast is one of the strongest in the Roger Moore era and boasts one of his strongest performances.

    13. Licence to Kill, 1989.
    Dalton produces an edgy and tense performance in his final film. The goon squad are played superbly, especially Robert Davi as Franz Sanchez. The confrontation between him and Bond is a highlight to the film. Licence to Kill also features some frantic action, a fitting tribute to Dalton’s terrific portrayal of 007.

    12. For Your Eyes Only, 1981.
    Representing a welcome return to the more serious side of 007 after the comedic hi-tech hi-jinks of Moonraker. The great action is well tempered by a paired down plot. The supporting cast of Carole Bouquet (Melina Havelock), Topol (Columbo) and Julian Glover (Kristatos), give great performances, which meshes well with one of Roger Moore’s best portrayals of James Bond.

    11. The Living Daylights, 1987.
    Timothy Dalton is supremely impressive in his debut performance as 007. The plot is well written and has a fine script. The film benefits from a great attention to detail, in a similar vein to the rest of John Glen’s work. The fantastic elements of espionage are well balanced with some terrific action. Dalton also enjoys a convincing relationship with his leading lady, Maryam d’Abo, in this well rounded thriller.

    10. Skyfall, 2012.
    Featuring an excellent cast, great script, gorgeous cinematography by Roger Deakins and inspired direction from Sam Mendes, Skyfall is one great Bond flick. Skyfall trades the soundness of its plot, in order to be thematically strong, which is an admitted flaw to this 50th Anniversary treat.

    9. Quantum of Solace, 2008.
    QoS has a bleak ambience that makes it unique in the Bondian canon. Marc Forster delivers a most visually impressive film, being brisk and classy, helped by good work from a production design and cinematography standpoint. The oft-maligned hyper editing is a drawback, yet the highlight to this picture Craig’s subtle character study of Bond.

    8. The Spy Who Loved Me, 1977.
    The series returned in fine fettle, after the disappointing box offices grosses for The Man With The Golden Gun. The scope and style is reminiscent of the earlier Bond films, with stylish direction by Lewis Gilbert. Spy boasts some great stunt work and action, all centred around Roger Moore’s definitive Bondian performance.

    7. Goldfinger, 1964.
    This glittering classic introduces all the legendary hallmarks of the series, defining the style of the franchise. Goldfinger is also the first film to put an emphasis on high tech gadgetry. The movie itself, is wonderfully balanced and includes some of the most iconic scenes and most memorable casts of the series.

    6. No Time to Die, 2021.
    The script is playful, the tone is fun, the direction by Cary Fukunaga is both stylish and, at times, thoughtful. The action is kinetic and brutal. The dynamic between Commander Bond and Dr. Swann is heart wrenching stuff. But, at the end of the day, No Time to Die is all about Bond and the superb actor that portrays him, in his fifth and final effort, Daniel Craig. A fitting send off to the Craig era.

    5. Dr No, 1962.
    Sean Connery steals the show as the charismatic 007. He receives wonderful support from a great cast, a strong story and superb direction from Terrence Young, not to mention worthy contributions from Ken Adam and Peter Hunt as Production Designer and Editor, respectively. Although lacking the polish of later entries, there is great attention to detail running throughout Dr. No.

    4. On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969.
    The cast of Majesty’s is of the standard of From Russia With Love or Goldfinger. Other strengths include a faithful adaptation of possibly Ian Fleming’s finest work, Peter Hunt’s majestic direction and John Barry’s best musical score. George Lazenby impresses in the action scenes, but, ultimately is a disappointing successor to Sean Connery. Lazenby, however, does show great potential and has good chemistry with the wonderful Diana Rigg (Tracy di Vicenzo) and Telly Savalas (the best of the various Blofeld’s).

    3. Thunderball, 1965.
    Epic and lush, Thunderball features Sean Connery at his most virile best and Luciana Paluzzi is simply smouldering, as the unrepentantly bad girl of Fiona Volpe. The film also achieves the right blend of Fleming glamour and brutality (see FRWL and OHMSS) and widescreen fantasy (see YOLT and TSWLM). John Barry, Ken Adam, Ted Moore and Peter Hunt are all up to their usual high standards, in this eye popping action adventure.

    2. Casino Royale, 2006.
    A refreshingly mature and well written film, which succeeds in presenting a classic Bondian thriller with a twist – Daniel Craig’s more earnest and visceral interpretation of our man. Which breathes new life into a character that has been in the pop zeitgeist for more than half a century.

    1. From Russia with Love, 1963.
    Several hallmarks of the series are established in this classic entry, namely Desmond Llewelyn as “Q”, the introduction of Ernst Stavro Blofeld, the pre titles sequence and the theme song. Moreover, From Russia With Love has the best written plot of the series – it is fantastic to watch Bond being outmanoeuvred from the start. The film also boasts one of the finest casts to appear in a Bond movie, the direction from Terrence Young is uniformly excellent and John Barry makes his debut as composer.


    I hope you enjoyed the show. Goodnight.



  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    @royale65 , agree with some, and disagree with the rest, but great show. Well thought out and formulated, nice read.
    R.cc91569498dae58d68f34ade1b76dfe3?rik=%2fTW5Hf2ONt%2b5FA&riu=http%3a%2f%2fpbs.twimg.com%2fmedia%2fDiPflJ6W0AUjUwS.jpg&ehk=9dao7nBIghU%2b0WaKzl9IDd6lhA4MjNlxbY68tuUQtng%3d&risl=&pid=ImgRaw&r=0
  • royale65royale65 Caustic misanthrope reporting for duty.
    Posts: 4,422
    What a wistful pic of Miss Goodnight you've chosen there @Thunderfinger . Goodnight may have been a somewhat of a ditz, but Britt played her with such warmth and vim, it's hard not to like her.

    Thank you for the read. I was trying to not repeat myself after doing a run through on @NicNac 's fine thread https://www.mi6community.com/discussion/851/tell-us-all-about-your-bondathon#latest
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    edited March 2022 Posts: 6,824
    I'm going to try and write some thoughts down on my most recent rankings, which have changed quite a bit these last few days, starting with my bottom choices.

    27. SKYFALL (2012, S. Mendes)
    Definitely not one we're used to see at the bottom, but I have to be honest here and for me it's my least favourite.

    Now, I have no problem admitting that SF is technically well-made, with good actors giving fine performances, gorgeous shot compositions and fabulous cinematography.

    It’s just not for me. I feel like this one thinks it’s really smart, pretentiously looking down on the rest of the franchise (making a joke at the expense of GE of all films), acting as if it has reinvented Bond, while it’s chockfull of plot holes.

    For me it’s a pretty lifeless, energy-free affair, with dull locations and an unpleasant atmosphere. Other films might have more cringey moments, but I just have a better time with them. I find little enjoyment in SF, and believe me, I have tried really hard.

    In the end though, it’s like that conversation with a person who takes himself very seriously while he really shouldn’t.

    GG's rrating: 2.5/5

    26. CASINO ROYALE (1967, V. Guest, Et al.)
    One can’t possibly put this one much higher, despite actually enjoying it quite a bit. But it’s a Bond film ranking and on that account it’s a disaster.

    A disaster that is an explosion of 60’s excesses including a fair bunch of actors that I absolutely adore (David Niven, Peter Sellers, Orson Welles and even Jean-Paul Belmondo), trippy production design and a great Burt Bacharach score.

    There is of course no plot and not all jokes are successful, but this one does feature my favourite Miss Moneypenny: Barbara Bouchet. For entirely subjective reasons, naturally. I can feel the huge giallo fan in me celebrating ecstatically, nevertheless.

    GG’s rating: 2.5/5

    25. LIVE AND LET DIE (1973, G. Hamilton)
    There is a huge gap of enjoyment between this one and SF, for this one at least knows what it is.

    Regretfully, there are some painpoints. The locations are uninteresting, the opaque cinematography lacks atmosphere and both the pre-title sequence as well as the finale make almost no impression whatsoever. Except for a single terrible one, which is Kananga's embarassing demise. I also think Rog still had to find his modjo as Bond here. He might have been old in AVTAK, but I felt he knew where he wanted to go in that one, while in this one he's still searching a bit.

    Nonetheless, it's a testament to how much I love these films, that even in a film that I rank so low, I can find aspects that I love, such as the hilarious Tee Hee, the spooky Baron Samedi and my very favourite M scene of the series.

    GG's rating: 3/5


    24. DIE ANOTHER DAY (2002, L. Tamahori)
    Since DAD’s flaws, of which there are many, have been well-documented I don’t feel I should explain why it’s near the bottom, I do feel I should explain why it’s not dead last.

    That’s because it was the first Bond film I saw in theaters and also because my middle name is Melancholy.

    Aside from that, I genuinely enjoy myself from the Hong Kong hotel entrance all the way up to, and including, the car duel, which I think is rather well-done. Although a certain laser fight and an even more notorious tsunami scene are head-scratchingly ill-advised even for Mr. Melancholy.

    On a more positive note I love the Blades’ sword fight, the ice palace design and Miranda Frost. A special shoutout also to allies Raoul and the hotel manager, they always crack me up the both of them.

    Maybe I should take off my nostalgia goggles and fulminate about the terrible CGI and the adolescent puns, but my 13-year old self wouldn’t forgive me. Analyse this, indeed.

    GG’s rating: 3/5

    23. DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER (1971, G. Hamilton)
    The most sleazy Bond film, set in the most kitschy place on the planet, as if it was written in the stars.

    Following OHMSS, that's not acceptable of course. Nothing in this film makes any sense, especially Moneypenny asking Bond a diamond ring after his wife just died at the end of the previous film.

    Having said that, it's full of witty dialogue, it has a marvellous soundtrack and a whole collection of eccentric side characters. I usually have a good time with DAF, unless I watch the series chronologically.

    GG’s rating: 3.5/5

    22. YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE (1967, L. Gilbert)
    Fabulous on all accounts (locations, cinematography, sets and music) this one, though I do have difficulties with one particular segment of this film.

    It all starts wonderful with the unfolding mystery, the Tokyo scenes, charming allies Mr. Henderson and Tiger Tanaka, but at a certain point the film’s pace comes to a halt to provide Bond with a ridiculously unconvincing and wildly questionable Japanese disguise.

    Luckily it does have one of the strongest climaxes of the series as we go out on a big bang, literally.

    GG’s rating: 3.5/5

    21. NO TIME TO DIE (2021, C.J. Fukunaga)
    This one has dropped quite a bit since my first viewings. Whenever I finish it, it leaves a bitter aftertaste. It has been written towards a predestined ending and maybe it's for that reason that I don't really feel invested in what happens onscreen.

    Still though, the pre-title sequence, the titles + the Eilish song and the Cuba scene with Ana de Armas are all excellent. It's the later part that I find somewhat unsatisfactory, even though I'd say Léa Seydoux does a cracking job as Madeleine.

    Ultimately, there is a lot that I enjoy about NTTD, though that ending I would have liked to have been handled differently. ‘We Have All the Time in the World’ also belongs in OHMSS for me.

    GG’s rating: 3.5/5
  • CharmianBondCharmianBond Pett Bottom, Kent
    Posts: 549
    Great writeup for Spectre @Quantum_of_Tomorrow, there are wonderful little moments throughout the film. It's a much funnier than I remember, I think Van Hoytema's homogenous colour grading not only looks unimpressive but it's actively working against the tone of film. It's the only DC film which comes close to the 'Bank holiday/lazy Sunday afternoon stick on a Bond film' feeling that means I can't fully bring myself to hate it.
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    Posts: 6,824
    20. TOMORROW NEVER DIES (1997, R. Spottiswoode)
    It's worrying that the villain of a by-the-numbers 90's Bond film has become one of the most realistic ones in the franchise. I'm sure dear old Elliott would love the algorithm-controlled social media of today.

    About the film though, I thoroughly enjoy TND's exciting, well-paced and occasionally funny first part. Pierce is also in great form and it shows, he's having a great time and so am I. Got to love Dr. Kaufman as well, what a deliciously crazy crackpot.

    In the second half, TND gradually becomes more and more of a generic action film, unfortunately, resulting in a fairly mundane shootout near the end. Overall, with a strong first half and a mediocre second one, it's definitely a missed opportunity.

    GG's rating: 3.5/5


    19. NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN (1983, I. Kershner)
    Sir Sean returns one last time, surrounded by two excellent villains, Klaus Maria Brandauer and Barbara Carrera, as well as my favourite Felix, Bernie Casey.

    The typical EON tropes like the gunbarrel, the colourful title sequence and the James Bond theme are sorely missed and as a consequence it feels a bit Bond B-side.

    I nevertheless think this is a more enjoyable goodbye to Sean's Bond than either YOLT or DAF, thanks in no small part to the man himself, playing 007 with a lot more gusto than in his two EON fairwells.

    GG's rating: 4/5

    18. MOONRAKER (1979; L. Gilbert)
    From a French château (set in California for some reason), to Venice and Rio, to the Amazon and outer space, MR is a globe-, or even better, universe-trotting spy farce that can be enjoyed when you're in that rainy afternoon kind of vibe.

    Don't be too critical of its lazy writing or its childish humour, it's all about self-aware silliness this one. Beautifully shot and magnificently scored silliness that is.

    Moreover, its production design and special effects are awe-inspiring. Sure, there's a pigeon double-take and Jaws falls in love on Tsjaikovski's Romeo & Juliet, but at least MR is in on its own joke.

    GG's rating: 4/5

    17. SPECTRE (2015, S. Mendes)
    First I hated SP, than I loved it, and now I think it's good but not great.

    In other words, at first I used to be blind for its positive aspects, such as the great locations, the mysterious atmosphere and the elegant Bond girl duo Léa Seydoux-Monica Bellucci. Subsequently, I turned a blind eye to its lesser aspects, such as the retro-active world building and the horrendous decision to make Blofeld Bond's foster-brother.

    Today, I acknowledge both the good and the bad, and foremost I appreciate that it is that one Craig Bond film that actually feels like it wants to be a Bond film.

    GG's rating: 4/5

    16. GOLDFINGER (1964, G. Hamilton)
    There's no denying GF, being iconic from beginning to end, is the prototype Bond film that has allowed the franchise to live on for so long, making 007 a cultural icon.

    For me personally though, as much as I love several moments in this film, it's not one that I want to revisit all that often. I miss the travelogue aspect, with the Kentucky ranch setting being especially underwhelming. The barn scene is also particularly cringy, even to 1960's standards.

    Regardless of these gripes, there is still enough to enjoy, such as the wide variety of amusing characters, the imaginative production design and the sparkling dialogue.

    GG's rating: 4/5
  • goldenswissroyalegoldenswissroyale Switzerland
    Posts: 4,405
    I have a good time with your list so far @GoldenGun.
    SF, LALD and NTTD are much higher in my ranking but 3 or 3.5/5 is still solid.
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    Posts: 6,824
    I have a good time with your list so far @GoldenGun.
    SF, LALD and NTTD are much higher in my ranking but 3 or 3.5/5 is still solid.

    Thanks a lot @goldenswissroyale ! Glad you’re enjoying it :)

    SF and LALD are definitely unpopular bottom choices, but I just don’t feel what others do when watching them. It’s all personal of course.

    Still though, anything that I give 2.5 or more I enjoy at least on some level. So far, there hasn’t been a single Bond film that I actively dislike.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    I am also looking forward to the rest.
  • GBFGBF
    Posts: 3,197
    I hope "The Living Daylights" will be #1 again. Would be very deserved... :-)
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    edited March 2022 Posts: 6,824
    15. THE SPY WHO LOVED ME (1977, L. Gilbert)

    TSWLM is the perfect mix of everything the Gilbert Bond films excelled at: beautiful locations, stunning cinematography, futuristic sets, breathtaking stunts and an epic scope throughout. This time though, it also includes an interesting dynamic between Bond and the Bond girl, and indeed also at the same time between West and East.

    Why doesn't it end up any higher then? I've seen Barbara Bach in quite a few giallo films, and never did she act as if she was a robot, but as Anya, regretfully, she does. My guess is that she was asked to do so, and I'm afraid it's not convincing at all.

    Moreover, Rog has a few questionable moments of his own, taking away the tension in the scene where Jaws attacks their van by wisecracking all over it, or smirking inappropriately at Anya when he told her he killed her lover the scene before.

    That scene, however, is a great scene, in which Rog gives it his all. One of the many highlights in an entertaining larger-than-life Bond outing, being the ultimate comfort food of the franchise, easy-going and tense at the same time. A pity about those few lesser moments mentioned above, but make no mistake about it, this one is always an enjoyable rewatch.

    GG's rating: 4/5

    14. A VIEW TO A KILL (1985, J. Glen)

    As absurd as its aging star pretending to be the world's best secret agent, AVTAK is similar to its own phenomenal title song; it makes no sense at all, but it's a lot of fun nevertheless.

    At least for someone like me, who loves 80's atmosphere. With John Barry's mix of orchestra and electric guitars, with villain duo Christopher Walken - Grace Jones, with dated computers and microchip-inspired semi-science, with a Cold War subplot just for the sake of it, with a collection of Bond girls that could've come straight from a Miami Vice set, with Seiko watches and a title sequence filled with neon and lasers, this one delivers such a mood in spades.

    Yes, the fire engine chase is embarrassing, the stunt doubles are obvious and the plot is daft, these are all valid criticisms, though none of them stops me from going along for the ride.

    One word also on Rog, who is undeniably too old for the part here at 57, he still remains devoted to the role and, acting-wise, he gives a fine performance. And now that we're on the main characters, Tanya Roberts might be screaming a bit too much, she makes for a very likeable Stacey nonetheless. And you know, she's just a civilian caught in this mess, I'd be screaming too if I were stuck in an elevator during a fire.

    GG'rating: 4/5

    13. DR. NO (1962, T. Young)

    The absolute highlight of this solid low-key detective thriller is without any question Sean Connery. Later episodes also features fantastic performances by the different Bonds, but given the increasingly higher production values, none of those episodes had to rely mostly on its protagonist alone, however strong they might have been. This one more or less has to and it's all the better for it.

    That's not to say there's nothing else to enjoy about DN. There's the setting of early 1960's Jamaica, there are the Ken Adam sets, the excellent villains, a fantastic Felix in Jack Lord, one of Bond's best allies in Quarrel and, of course, there's also Ursula Andress.

    Not yet so impressive on stunts or action scenes, and the Monty Norman score is a bit misplaced here and there, but overall a cracking first entry for Bond.

    GG's rating: 4/5

  • edited March 2022 Posts: 6,955
    Love your take on AVTAK, @GoldenGun, there was a programme on BBC4, 'Premium Bond' where Mark Gatiss and Matthew Sweet took a close look at all the actors ( they were particularly kind to Dalton, quite rightly 😁) but Gatiss used your exact description of Rog for AVTAK, a geriatric pretending to be the worlds greatest secret agent! Agree with you too, that the 80's gave us great Bond movies, John Glens era was hugely entertaining! And of course, it gave us THE best James Bond 😉
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    edited March 2022 Posts: 6,824
    Thanks @Mathis1, I really like AVTAK despite the obvious flaws that it has. That goes for the majority of the Moore era, they might not be perfect, but they’re colourful fun and that’s what makes them so rewatchable.

    When I’m in a bad mood, or stressed-out, films like MR or AVTAK are definitely a better medicine than something more serious.
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