Complete and Detailed Bond Movie Ranking

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  • Posts: 6,975
    GoldenGun wrote: »
    Thanks @Mathis1, I really like AVTAK despite the obvious flaws that it has. That goes for the majority of the Moore era, they might not be perfect, but they’re colourful fun and that’s what makes them so rewatchable.

    When I’m in a bad mood, or stressed-out, films like MR or AVTAK are definitely a better medicine than something more serious.

    I know exactly what you mean! I thought of putting this in the Controversial Opinions of Bond thread, but despite my love of Daltons 2, OHMSS, and most of Craigs/Connerys films, if I just want pure entertainment/ enjoyment/ cheering up....its Roger Moore era every time!
  • Posts: 1,578
    I find that a specific ranking gets too arbitrary. I see it that some of them are very good, some are good, and some not. So I'll go with the good ol' Siskel and Ebert simplicity: Worth seeing (well they're ALL "worth seeing for a fan" so this comes down to more like "worth seeing again"), or not, and commendations for the very good ones. So I use 2 checks for very good,1 check for good, 1 X for not.
    Except that I cannot type a checkmark, so I'll use YY, Y and N
    Looking at it now, I suppose it would be easier for me to rank the Y, and even the X, but the YY ? Again - when more than one are so good in their own, different ways, ranking them becomes arbitrary.

    Y DN (very nearly a YY but then the next three would be YYY, and if it's going to be one Y apart, then just keep it simple with one Y)
    YY FRWL
    YY GF
    YY TB
    Y CR '67 (it was fun, and enjoyable as a spoof after a long stretch of Bond and spy "fever")
    X YOLT
    YY OHMSS
    Y DAF (it was a return to fun without the bloat of YOLT, and great to have SC back, and he was MUCH better than in YOLT)
    Y LALD
    X TMWTGG
    YY TSWLM
    Y MR (darn close to an X; a shame that a film with the elegant and brutal forest rundown also had such clownish elements, of which brining Jaws back and having him turn good so quickly and his life-changing relationship with, um, an adult Pippi Longstocking ? Who dreamed THAT up ?)
    Y FYEO
    Y NSNA (once again, great to have SC back, and he was much better than in YOLT)
    YY OP (a return to fun, rather like DAF was a return to fun)
    X AVTAK (precious little to like of this one)
    Y TLD
    X LTK
    YY GE
    YY TND
    Y TWINE (Dr. Christmas Jones did not even need to be in the film, and hurt it. Take her out and it becomes closer in tone to CR the 2nd and could be a YY)
    X DAD (Too bad they messed it up after a good start)
    YY CR
    YY QOS (Swift, direct, with some cool, elegant portions like re-uniting with Mathis, the opera and the showdown in the desert resort and all which came afterward)
    YY SF
    Y SP (Just three things really stand out as keeping from a YY: Handgun bringing down a helicopter, Bond showing very little ill effects from brain-needle, and, to a lesser extent, Brofeld. It clearly was an attempt to get back to a fun Bond mission movie, with a GREAT PTS)
    YY NTTD

    In an attempt to ranking the Y, first, here they are:
    DN
    CR '67
    DAF
    LALD
    MR
    FYEO
    NSNA
    TLD
    TWINE
    SP

    Now, for Ranking them...Hmmm...too many of them and they're too varied to rank, as I look at it now. Something like:

    DN
    SP
    DAF
    FYEO
    TWINE
    LALD
    NSNA
    TLD (TDalton was so poorly served by dull scripts, dull productions, and his second certainly got the worst of it, unfortunately, but TLD was not much of a return of Bond to the screen after RMoore's departure, either. It was a significant disappointment after looking forward to a new Bond in his prime again. The ending after the action, barely, anti-climactic climax was wan. Didn't they learn from the lame AVTAK ending not to end it with Bond and the leading lady indoors in such a mundane setting ?Taking the camera to the fountain does NOT qualify as properly ending it on the water. The villains barely were villains and, um, what WAS their plan again ? That is to say, not very memorable at all. Great stuff like the pipeline-travel-express trick, the assassin infiltrating the meeting in the country, and the Aston chase leading to musically sliding down the snowy hill with a great Bondian line ["We've nothing to declare !"], the fight at the rear of the cargo plane were wasted in this film. Many are very fond of TDalton, but that does not make the films good. RMoore is super-likable, too, with a different sort of Bond that was right for the time, but that does not make all his films good, either, and likewise with PBrosnan. It as none of those gents' faults - it was poor scripts or poor portions, and some dull direction and cinematography for some Moore and Dalton films)
    CR '67
    MR (my disappointment lingers to this day, there are so many awful things in it, and truly a shame, after such a great Bondian go with TSWLM)
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    edited March 2022 Posts: 6,838
    12. FOR YOUR EYES ONLY (1981, J. Glen)

    If I'd be a boxticker FYEO would top my list. It has everything that I want in a (Bond) film.

    Cold War espionage: Check. Behind enemy lines: Albania in 1981, so yes check. Set in Italy: Check. Giugiaro-designed car: Lotus Esprit, Check. Underwater action: Check. Snowy action: Check. Funky music: Check. A Seiko: two of them! Check. Check. Charming ally: Topol, check. Gorgeous and awesome Bond girl: Carole Bouquet wielding a crossbow, double-check.

    On top of that, Rog is in excellent form too. So I've got nothing but praise for FYEO, the only negative I could come up with, is that all of these aspects, while executed very well, have been done slightly better in another entry. I'd also argue the climax is a bit too quickly handled and not very tense either. The villians here might be a good metaphor, I like them all quite a lot, but none of them tops my list of the franchise's best.

    FYEO is a favourite, most certainly, but it's not my absolute favourite. Given the competition, there's no shame in that. If anything, it's a huge compliment for the franchise.

    GG’s rating: 4.5/5

    11. THE WORLD IS NOT ENOUGH (1999, M. Apted)

    Not in everyone's top half but it always has been in mine. Maybe that's because it was my very first Bond film and I'm therefore more forgiving towards some of its flaws, or maybe it's because I think there's also a lot of greatness in there that should not be so easily overlooked.

    Presumably it's a combination of both. Sophie Marceau for instance is a great villain, and the internal struggle Bond has to go through because of this devilishly beautiful manipulatrix gives Pierce the opportunity to deliver his most meaty Bond performance.

    The action scenes are mostly well-done, with the Thames chase being particularly spectacular, the plot is much more engaging and well-written than many would give it credit for, and David Arnold's music is at his best here, safe maybe for QOS.

    The only aspect I’m not sure about is not, and I might be the only one on the planet here, Denise Richards, who I actually quite like, but Robert Carlyle’s Renard, who comes across like an angry toddler with terrible parents.

    Having said that, I love this film. It's the film that made me a Bond fan, and the Bond films made me a film fan. I owe a lot to TWINE, clearly.

    GG's rating: 4.5/5

    10. THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN GUN (1974, G. Hamilton)

    The last of the Saltzman/Broccoli co-productions might not be 007’s most thought-provoking outing, though its iconic titular villain and his golden gun belong in the hall of Bond franchise greats.

    Furthermore, the location work is phenomenal, with the Asian settings giving this outing an atmospheric mood throughout. All that is also complimented by Peter Murton’s excellent set design (sunken liner hideout, island fun palace, etc.).

    Of course one could complain about the many illogical conveniences, such as Hip leaving Bond behind during an escape or Pepper wanting a test drive while on a holiday, let’s not be blind for the lesser aspects of our favourites.

    TMWTGG is obviously flawed, but Christopher Lee, Nick Nack, the likeable Bond girls, the locations, the atmosphere, an underrated John Barry score, Roger Moore in probably his most Flemingesque outing as 007 and that awesome golden gun give this one more than enough to warrant a top 10 spot for me.

    After all, Phuyuk isn’t great but it’s definitely much more tolerable with a Britt Ekland-Maud Adams dilemma afterwards.

    GG’s rating: 4.5/5
  • ProfJoeButcherProfJoeButcher Bless your heart
    Posts: 1,697
    Great GG review. Glad you mentioned the sets, which I think are easily top five for the series.
  • edited March 2022 Posts: 3,252
    1) From Russia With Love

    - Been my favourite since I was 8. Improves on the novel's plot I'd say. Performances, action sequences, editing etc. are all great. I enjoy it more and more every time I watch it.

    2) Skyfall

    - Some script contrivances that I can accept aside (why would Silva get himself captured just to escape in this manner? Very elaborate) this is a stand out film of the series. It breaks the Bond formula and has a cynicism to it, but it's recognisably Bond both in the sense that it works as a film and feels Fleming-esque in terms of its themes. Cinematography and editing are some of the best of the series, as are the performances.

    3) On Her Majesty's Secret Service

    - It has its flaws (Lazenby's performance is inconsistent and some of the plot doesn't adapt well to screen, Bond's odd 'resignation' scene being one of them) but it's impossible for me not to be smitten by this film. Great cinematography and stunt work, and great performances from Rigg and Savalas.

    4) The Spy Who Loved Me

    - Used to dislike this film (found it a silly Roger Moore film in my youth) but the more I've rewatched it the more I like it. I love the central relationship between Bond and Anya, and Moore does some of his best acting when he tells her he killed her lover. Same for the big action sequences towards the end, genuinely tense stuff. Jaws is one of the best henchmen of the series, and overall I can't help but enjoy this film.

    5) Goldeneye

    - Like TSWLM, this film 'saved' the series in a sense. For me, Brosnan always worked better as a breezier, more understated Bond, and this is where he's at his best. The Bond formula is not only retained but updated in this film, and everything from the villains to the plot holds together.

    6) License to Kill

    - Not everyone's cup of tea, but out of all the films where Bond goes 'off grid' this is the most convincing for me. Dalton's intensity in the role is spellbinding to watch (such an underrated Bond) and while there are perhaps just one too many antagonists there are some great performances by Davi and Del Torro. The central story is simple but engaging. Such gripping stunt work during the final chase too.

    7) Dr. No

    - Clearly lower budget than other entries, and one can tell the series was finding that Bond 'formula' but it's a classic Fleming story and Connery nails it.

    8) Casino Royale

    - Another solid entry, and Craig puts in a great performance. It's the type of Bond film most fans tend to come back to again and again and I can see why. Even elements of it I found unnecessary back in 2006 (the sinking house was never my cup of tea) don't detract for me now.

    9) Goldfinger

    - It does drag ever so slightly at the beginning of the third act, but like FRWL the script improves vastly on the novel's plot (even in the context of Bond the idea of robbing Fort Knox is a bit outlandish). Iconic villain and Bond girl, and Connery is at his best here. I'm not as terribly fond of the song as a lot of others are but it's undeniably a classic.

    10) Octopussy

    - Yes, it's silly (what's going on with the sound design? Why all the Tarzan yells and tiger roars?) but at its heart this is a really effective Cold War thriller. Even Bond dressing as a clown and trying desperately to disarm the bomb plays as tense in the moment. I'd take this any day over FYEO. Also, Bond/Octopussy's relationship is one of the most convincing and I'd say interesting of the series.

    11) The Living Daylights

    - Not as good as Dalton's second outing, and I'm really not a fan of Kara (feels like she should be more of a femme fatale in order to work as a character). The villains are a touch forgettable too. Despite this, it's a good outing and draws effectively from Fleming's source material while making it a solid story in its own right.

    12) Live and Let Die

    - Another one that's grown on me. It feels fresh after DAF with a great debut from Moore. I also love little subversions of this film such as Bond's magnetic watch not working during the crocodile run, or the whole ambiguity of the more supernatural elements. The theme song is a banger too.

    13) Tomorrow Never Dies

    - It feels a bit dated/like a 90s action movie in places, but much like Moonraker when I rewatch this film I find there's a lot to like. I genuinely think Bond's backstory with Paris feels extraordinarily well written and acted (seriously, their dialogue in the hotel could be from an old school film noir) and while Carver is a bit of a weedy figure the idea of a millionaire mogul manipulating the news is an interesting angle. The theme song is genuinely one of my favourites. Oh, and the scene with Dr. Kaufman is awesome. Honestly, I think this one is underrated.

    14) Moonraker

    - There's an element of 'it's not as bad as I remember' here. I don't have much tolerance for anything in a Bond film I think could be in a comedy (Jaws falling in love with Dolly due to their heights is one) but on rewatching Moonraker I feel it's not anywhere near as camp as its reputation. Lonsdale is such a delight to watch as Drax, and there moments in which this film has such great atmosphere/cinematography (Corrine's death, the fight between Bond and Chang etc.) The stunt work is some of the best of the series, and even the space sequences aren't as outlandish as one would expect. There's an actual sense of threat with Drax's plan, genuine tension during the climax, and despite all my problems with the sillier elements of this film, I feel what it gets right for me makes up for that. I even like Holly Goodhead and Bond's little character arc of slowly coming to respect her after initially being condescending towards her.

    15) No Time To Die

    - I'm still conflicted over this film. On the one hand the ending does nothing for me, and I feel it needed another few rewrites to get everything right. The cinematography, while sleek, is a bit surface level for me. The title song is boring. Safin's motivations are all over the place. It's frustrating as this film gets so much right, especially after SP - the relationship between Madeline/Bond feels stronger in this one, the opening flashback is great, the stunt work/editing is excellent, the Cuba sequence is a highlight for many fans. One of its strongest points is the dynamics between characters, and much of this is down to the high quality of Fukunaga's direction as well as the great performances all round. I'd go as far to say that the film is nearly perfect up until Blofeld's interrogation. I just feel this film treads this odd line between being a great Bond film and a terrible mistake. Very frustrating film.

    16) SPECTRE

    - Again, a frustrating film for me. It feels like it needed another few rewrites (Bond and Blofeld being foster brothers feels like something from an early draft that should have been phased out). For all the hype about bringing SPECTRE and Blofeld back into the series, the film relies too much on previous Bond motifs/iconography. Instead of reinterpreting these story elements we instead get a lacklustre performance from Waltz, generic SPECTRE things like a death in a stuffy board room, and Blofeld's cat/eye scar reappearing randomly. There's much to like in this film (the opening shot is pretty cool, the scenes in the health clinic are wonderful, and I even like the idea of the torture scene). Again, like NTTD it's like there's a great Bond film in there but just can't quite get out.

    17) The Man With The Golden Gun

    - Another missed opportunity. Scaramanga and Nick Nack are wasted in this film. I appreciate the more hardboiled aspects of this one, particularly Bond's early investigating in Hong Kong. The funhouse scene at the beginning is also great, although the final show down between Bond/Scaramanga feels like it could have been strengthened. Other problems are that the plot is confused about what it wants to focus on (I feel they should have stripped it down to Scaramanga's obsession with Bond as the Solex subplot adds nothing... even by the villain's own admission he has little interest in it). Very silly comedy elements also keep popping up in which does this no favours. Bond also comes across as... well, an ar*ehole in this one, especially towards Goodnight. Not in a cocky, ultimately redeemable way as in CR or MR though. Lots to like, but it should have been better.

    18) A View To A Kill

    - First Bond film I ever watch so I have a soft spot for it. It's not the most energetic film of the series though. Moore is too old in this context for the part, the Bond girl is... well, bad. That said I love Zorin and May Day, and I enjoy this film every time I watch it.

    19) You Only Live Twice

    - Connery looks noticeably bored in this one. I actually don't like Pleasance's performance all that much, although Blofeld's reveal is undeniably iconic. It has its moments. I love how the fight sequence was filmed on the rooftops of the docks with the helicopter shot. Really stands out for me. The production design of the volcano is great and like many of the classic Bonds the stunt work is great. I just don't enjoy this film that much.

    20) Die Another Day

    - It gets a lot of hate... the CGI is bad and looks more and more dated by the day. Invisible cars are just not especially believable for me. That said there are some highlights to this one. I actually like the PTS, and Brosnan's performance as Bond is actually generally solid throughout this one. He especially looks good during the Cuba scenes. It's not great... bad in places actually, but I would say it's not as bad as many make it out to be.

    21) Quantum of Solace

    - This film was butchered. Forster was completely the wrong choice of director (strange visual/editing choices - why cut to a horse race during a perfectly tense interrogation? First year film school nonsense). That said it does its job, and scenes such as Bond and Camille's near suicide in the burning hotel really stand out for me. I like the supporting characters in this one - Camille, Agent Fields and even Green. I think this film was always going to struggle following on from CR just by virtue of not having the source material to go from already, and the writer's strike/rushed production didn't help matters.

    22) Thunderball

    - I get a lot of flack for this one. I just find it dull. I get that the underwater sequences are technically accomplished, especially for the 60s, but they're hard to make exciting (all very slow, hard to follow etc.) Young was not the right director for this one I think. Someone like Gilbert had a better handle on the scale and visual finesse required for these larger Bond adventures. Apart from that I find Connery's performance noticeably lacklustre, and despite the iconic appearance of Largo he's just not as interesting a character as he is in the novel.

    23) Diamonds Are Forever

    - Like TMWTGG I like the more hardboiled elements of this one, and Connery actually seems to be putting in the effort. Much of the dialogue is memorable too, and of course Wint and Kidd are stand outs. Again, I just find much of this film a bit dull, and like I said I don't have much patience when I feel a Bond film is drifting into outright comedy. This film just does that a bit too much with the whole clone subplot, Grey's bizarre interpretation of Blofeld etc. Even the film doesn't seem to be taking itself seriously, which is a problem. Bond can be outlandish, even have moments of silliness/be tongue in cheek at points, but I feel it has to try and make its central premise believable and an important part of this is for the filmmakers to take their stories seriously. This film just doesn't do that.

    24) For Your Eyes Only

    - Perhaps I'm overly harsh on this one, but apart from finding it boring I don't think the character Moore plays is recognisably James Bond. I don't think any incarnation of Bond would wag his finger, quote Chinese proverbs and blabber on about the nature of revenge (Bond even kicks the henchman's car off a cliff out of revenge for Luigi's death later in the film, so it's not as though he practices what he preaches). As silly as Moonraker can be, this film drifts into outright parody at points - the opening with 'Blofeld' and the ending with 'Thatcher' being the most noticeably culprits. Also Bibi... those scenes between her and Bond are weird... Forgettable villain too. Waste of good Fleming material. Some good ski sequences though. Topol's great too.

    25) The World Is Not Enough

    - I always say this film is a prototype Skyfall. Things like Bond being injured, the more personal villain plot and involvement of M support this. I've also heard people say that this film is tonally off. It is. The performances all round, except Coltrane's and perhaps Marceau's, are embarrassing. Brosnan can't sell the dramatic scenes ("He knew about my shoulder, knew where to hurt me?!" Why does this scene feel like it should be in a soap opera?) in the same way Craig can in SF. Robert Carlyle is an accomplished character actor capable of playing menacing villains, and even he comes off as hammy. I won't say anything about Richards as it's all been said already. I hate this film. I personally find it near unwatchable.
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    Posts: 6,838
    Great GG review. Glad you mentioned the sets, which I think are easily top five for the series.

    Thanks @ProfJoeButcher! I always considered TMWTGG's sets, together with the OP ones to be the best non-Ken Adam set designs of the series. Both top 10 for me, maybe one of them would make my top 5 as well.

    @007HallY Interesting read, thanks for sharing.
  • Posts: 4,762
    007HallY wrote: »
    1) From Russia With Love

    - Been my favourite since I was 8. Improves on the novel's plot I'd say. Performances, action sequences, editing etc. are all great. I enjoy it more and more every time I watch it.

    2) Skyfall

    - Some script contrivances that I can accept aside (why would Silva get himself captured just to escape in this manner? Very elaborate) this is a stand out film of the series. It breaks the Bond formula and has a cynicism to it, but it's recognisably Bond both in the sense that it works as a film and feels Fleming-esque in terms of its themes. Cinematography and editing are some of the best of the series, as are the performances.

    3) On Her Majesty's Secret Service

    - It has its flaws (Lazenby's performance is inconsistent and some of the plot doesn't adapt well to screen, Bond's odd 'resignation' scene being one of them) but it's impossible for me not to be smitten by this film. Great cinematography and stunt work, and great performances from Rigg and Savalas.

    4) The Spy Who Loved Me

    - Used to dislike this film (found it a silly Roger Moore film in my youth) but the more I've rewatched it the more I like it. I love the central relationship between Bond and Anya, and Moore does some of his best acting when he tells her he killed her lover. Same for the big action sequences towards the end, genuinely tense stuff. Jaws is one of the best henchmen of the series, and overall I can't help but enjoy this film.

    5) Goldeneye

    - Like TSWLM, this film 'saved' the series in a sense. For me, Brosnan always worked better as a breezier, more understated Bond, and this is where he's at his best. The Bond formula is not only retained but updated in this film, and everything from the villains to the plot holds together.

    6) License to Kill

    - Not everyone's cup of tea, but out of all the films where Bond goes 'off grid' this is the most convincing for me. Dalton's intensity in the role is spellbinding to watch (such an underrated Bond) and while there are perhaps just one too many antagonists there are some great performances by Davi and Del Torro. The central story is simple but engaging. Such gripping stunt work during the final chase too.

    7) Dr. No

    - Clearly lower budget than other entries, and one can tell the series was finding that Bond 'formula' but it's a classic Fleming story and Connery nails it.

    8) Casino Royale

    - Another solid entry, and Craig puts in a great performance. It's the type of Bond film most fans tend to come back to again and again and I can see why. Even elements of it I found unnecessary back in 2006 (the sinking house was never my cup of tea) don't detract for me now.

    9) Goldfinger

    - It does drag ever so slightly at the beginning of the third act, but like FRWL the script improves vastly on the novel's plot (even in the context of Bond the idea of robbing Fort Knox is a bit outlandish). Iconic villain and Bond girl, and Connery is at his best here. I'm not as terribly fond of the song as a lot of others are but it's undeniably a classic.

    10) Octopussy

    - Yes, it's silly (what's going on with the sound design? Why all the Tarzan yells and tiger roars?) but at its heart this is a really effective Cold War thriller. Even Bond dressing as a clown and trying desperately to disarm the bomb plays as tense in the moment. I'd take this any day over FYEO. Also, Bond/Octopussy's relationship is one of the most convincing and I'd say interesting of the series.

    11) The Living Daylights

    - Not as good as Dalton's second outing, and I'm really not a fan of Kara (feels like she should be more of a femme fatale in order to work as a character). The villains are a touch forgettable too. Despite this, it's a good outing and draws effectively from Fleming's source material while making it a solid story in its own right.

    12) Live and Let Die

    - Another one that's grown on me. It feels fresh after DAF with a great debut from Moore. I also love little subversions of this film such as Bond's magnetic watch not working during the crocodile run, or the whole ambiguity of the more supernatural elements. The theme song is a banger too.

    13) Tomorrow Never Dies

    - It feels a bit dated/like a 90s action movie in places, but much like Moonraker when I rewatch this film I find there's a lot to like. I genuinely think Bond's backstory with Paris feels extraordinarily well written and acted (seriously, their dialogue in the hotel could be from an old school film noir) and while Carver is a bit of a weedy figure the idea of a millionaire mogul manipulating the news is an interesting angle. The theme song is genuinely one of my favourites. Oh, and the scene with Dr. Kaufman is awesome. Honestly, I think this one is underrated.

    14) Moonraker

    - There's an element of 'it's not as bad as I remember' here. I don't have much tolerance for anything in a Bond film I think could be in a comedy (Jaws falling in love with Dolly due to their heights is one) but on rewatching Moonraker I feel it's not anywhere near as camp as its reputation. Lonsdale is such a delight to watch as Drax, and there moments in which this film has such great atmosphere/cinematography (Corrine's death, the fight between Bond and Chang etc.) The stunt work is some of the best of the series, and even the space sequences aren't as outlandish as one would expect. There's an actual sense of threat with Drax's plan, genuine tension during the climax, and despite all my problems with the sillier elements of this film, I feel what it gets right for me makes up for that. I even like Holly Goodhead and Bond's little character arc of slowly coming to respect her after initially being condescending towards her.

    15) No Time To Die

    - I'm still conflicted over this film. On the one hand the ending does nothing for me, and I feel it needed another few rewrites to get everything right. The cinematography, while sleek, is a bit surface level for me. The title song is boring. Safin's motivations are all over the place. It's frustrating as this film gets so much right, especially after SP - the relationship between Madeline/Bond feels stronger in this one, the opening flashback is great, the stunt work/editing is excellent, the Cuba sequence is a highlight for many fans. One of its strongest points is the dynamics between characters, and much of this is down to the high quality of Fukunaga's direction as well as the great performances all round. I'd go as far to say that the film is nearly perfect up until Blofeld's interrogation. I just feel this film treads this odd line between being a great Bond film and a terrible mistake. Very frustrating film.

    16) SPECTRE

    - Again, a frustrating film for me. It feels like it needed another few rewrites (Bond and Blofeld being foster brothers feels like something from an early draft that should have been phased out). For all the hype about bringing SPECTRE and Blofeld back into the series, the film relies too much on previous Bond motifs/iconography. Instead of reinterpreting these story elements we instead get a lacklustre performance from Waltz, generic SPECTRE things like a death in a stuffy board room, and Blofeld's cat/eye scar reappearing randomly. There's much to like in this film (the opening shot is pretty cool, the scenes in the health clinic are wonderful, and I even like the idea of the torture scene). Again, like NTTD it's like there's a great Bond film in there but just can't quite get out.

    17) The Man With The Golden Gun

    - Another missed opportunity. Scaramanga and Nick Nack are wasted in this film. I appreciate the more hardboiled aspects of this one, particularly Bond's early investigating in Hong Kong. The funhouse scene at the beginning is also great, although the final show down between Bond/Scaramanga feels like it could have been strengthened. Other problems are that the plot is confused about what it wants to focus on (I feel they should have stripped it down to Scaramanga's obsession with Bond as the Solex subplot adds nothing... even by the villain's own admission he has little interest in it). Very silly comedy elements also keep popping up in which does this no favours. Bond also comes across as... well, an ar*ehole in this one, especially towards Goodnight. Not in a cocky, ultimately redeemable way as in CR or MR though. Lots to like, but it should have been better.

    18) A View To A Kill

    - First Bond film I ever watch so I have a soft spot for it. It's not the most energetic film of the series though. Moore is too old in this context for the part, the Bond girl is... well, bad. That said I love Zorin and May Day, and I enjoy this film every time I watch it.

    19) You Only Live Twice

    - Connery looks noticeably bored in this one. I actually don't like Pleasance's performance all that much, although Blofeld's reveal is undeniably iconic. It has its moments. I love how the fight sequence was filmed on the rooftops of the docks with the helicopter shot. Really stands out for me. The production design of the volcano is great and like many of the classic Bonds the stunt work is great. I just don't enjoy this film that much.

    20) Die Another Day

    - It gets a lot of hate... the CGI is bad and looks more and more dated by the day. Invisible cars are just not especially believable for me. That said there are some highlights to this one. I actually like the PTS, and Brosnan's performance as Bond is actually generally solid throughout this one. He especially looks good during the Cuba scenes. It's not great... bad in places actually, but I would say it's not as bad as many make it out to be.

    21) Quantum of Solace

    - This film was butchered. Forster was completely the wrong choice of director (strange visual/editing choices - why cut to a horse race during a perfectly tense interrogation? First year film school nonsense). That said it does its job, and scenes such as Bond and Camille's near suicide in the burning hotel really stand out for me. I like the supporting characters in this one - Camille, Agent Fields and even Green. I think this film was always going to struggle following on from CR just by virtue of not having the source material to go from already, and the writer's strike/rushed production didn't help matters.

    22) Thunderball

    - I get a lot of flack for this one. I just find it dull. I get that the underwater sequences are technically accomplished, especially for the 60s, but they're hard to make exciting (all very slow, hard to follow etc.) Young was not the right director for this one I think. Someone like Gilbert had a better handle on the scale and visual finesse required for these larger Bond adventures. Apart from that I find Connery's performance noticeably lacklustre, and despite the iconic appearance of Largo he's just not as interesting a character as he is in the novel.

    23) Diamonds Are Forever

    - Like TMWTGG I like the more hardboiled elements of this one, and Connery actually seems to be putting in the effort. Much of the dialogue is memorable too, and of course Wint and Kidd are stand outs. Again, I just find much of this film a bit dull, and like I said I don't have much patience when I feel a Bond film is drifting into outright comedy. This film just does that a bit too much with the whole clone subplot, Grey's bizarre interpretation of Blofeld etc. Even the film doesn't seem to be taking itself seriously, which is a problem. Bond can be outlandish, even have moments of silliness/be tongue in cheek at points, but I feel it has to try and make its central premise believable and an important part of this is for the filmmakers to take their stories seriously. This film just doesn't do that.

    24) For Your Eyes Only

    - Perhaps I'm overly harsh on this one, but apart from finding it boring I don't think the character Moore plays is recognisably James Bond. I don't think any incarnation of Bond would wag his finger, quote Chinese proverbs and blabber on about the nature of revenge (Bond even kicks the henchman's car off a cliff out of revenge for Luigi's death later in the film, so it's not as though he practices what he preaches). As silly as Moonraker can be, this film drifts into outright parody at points - the opening with 'Blofeld' and the ending with 'Thatcher' being the most noticeably culprits. Also Bibi... those scenes between her and Bond are weird... Forgettable villain too. Waste of good Fleming material. Some good ski sequences though. Topol's great too.

    25) The World Is Not Enough

    - I always say this film is a prototype Skyfall. Things like Bond being injured, the more personal villain plot and involvement of M support this. I've also heard people say that this film is tonally off. It is. The performances all round, except Coltrane's and perhaps Marceau's, are embarrassing. Brosnan can't sell the dramatic scenes ("He knew about my shoulder, knew where to hurt me?!" Why does this scene feel like it should be in a soap opera?) in the same way Craig can in SF. Robert Carlyle is an accomplished character actor capable of playing menacing villains, and even he comes off as hammy. I won't say anything about Richards as it's all been said already. I hate this film. I personally find it near unwatchable.

    Really enjoyed reading this! We share a similar Top Ten (and 11-15) but definitely deviate toward the lower end of the ranking, haha. I enjoyed the perspectives on your bottom three of four, though. I like TWINE but understand what you mean about its tonal strangeness. I don't know that I can explain it but certainly understand your point. I also agree about DAF even though I like it, too. I never considered how it defeats itself by not being as serious as it should be, especially as the follow-up to OHMSS.
  • edited April 2022 Posts: 3,252
    00Beast wrote: »

    Really enjoyed reading this! We share a similar Top Ten (and 11-15) but definitely deviate toward the lower end of the ranking, haha. I enjoyed the perspectives on your bottom three of four, though. I like TWINE but understand what you mean about its tonal strangeness. I don't know that I can explain it but certainly understand your point. I also agree about DAF even though I like it, too. I never considered how it defeats itself by not being as serious as it should be, especially as the follow-up to OHMSS.

    Glad you enjoyed reading it. Again, I tend to get a lot of flack for the TB and FYEO placements. Even TWINE isn't as disliked by many viewers as it is by me personally. DAF I always find disappointing in a similar way to NTTD and SP - it feels like it could have been great (like I said the harboiled noir elements and witty dialogue is there) but it's just trying so hard to be lighter/comedic in terms of tone that I feel it loses its way. Ah well, everyone's got different opinions on these films.
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    edited April 2022 Posts: 6,838
    9. QUANTUM OF SOLACE (2008, M. Forster)

    I can understand that for casual viewers, QOS might be a tad confusing when you haven't seen CR shortly before, but as a Bond fan, for me there's no such problem and I love that this film doesn't spell everything out all the time.

    QOS is a relevant film, touching upon themes such as shady geo-politics, favouritism and coping with loss. Obviously, such themes are not as easily digestible and clear-cut as, say, a more evident subject as 'old vs. new', though they keep this viewer intrigued every single time.

    In addition to its subltely and its relevance, QOS also has Daniel Craig at his most Bondian, while it's also a spectacular, beautifully shot, globetrotting spy thriller. Though it's in the quieter moments between Bond, Camille and Mathis that this film really shines.

    Concerning the much-maligned editing, may I remind cinemagoers it's not QOS that owes its action-editing style to Bourne, but Bourne who owes its action-editing style to Peter Hunt.

    Now, I have no problem admitting QOS could have done with some polishing here and there, but as much as that may be true, I'd invite anyone to look past those issues and discover QOS's hidden beauty.

    Directed by Swiss-German Marc Forster, it's not your usual action film of course, it leans more towards a European film than many of its kin, and that's also, much like Tosca, not everyone. I however love European cinema, and mixing such an approach with 007 makes QOS a film that's right up my ally.

    GG's rating: 4.5/5

    8. OCTOPUSSY (1983, J. Glen)

    Unfortuantely I don't think there's a Rog Bond film that falls perfectly into place the whole way through, though OP comes mighty close.

    Firstly, there's the man himself finding the perfect balance between Fleming's Bond and his own more jovial portrayal. Secondly, there's Maud Adams, the best Bond girl of the Moore years, who has tremendous chemistry with Rog. Thirdly, OP is a well-crafted Cold War spy adventure with atmospheric locations, amusing characters, inspired production design, a fine John Barry soundtrack and breathtaking stunts.

    Two other elements are unique to this entry that I personally find particularly satisfying:

    - OP is the only Bond film set in the GDR, and also the only Bond film that features the Berlin Wall, Checkpoint Charlie and the Inner German Border, which are, at least for me, the most iconic Cold War locations. For someone obsessed with the era, that's a big plus.
    - This is the only time Bond drives an Alfa Romeo! I know the DB5 and the Esprit are rightfully celebrated, but for me, as an alfista, the GTV6 is the most beautiful car Bond has ever driven.

    A Tarzan yell and a gorilla disguise away from pure perfection, it's rather remarkable that my favourite Moore film comes so late in his Bond career, which makes me realise I, for one, am glad he stayed on for so long.

    GG's rating: 4.5/5

    7. GOLDENEYE (1995, M. Campbell)

    The primary reason why I like GE as much as I do is the same reason why many others wouldn't place it any higher: Éric Serra's music.

    Being a fan of the man's work outside the Bond films, mainly the many scores he made for several Luc Besson films, the step for me isn't as big as for other fans I suppose. Moreover, I think GE, by nature a celebration of everything Bond, is given its very own, distinctive identity here, and avoids becoming a bit pastiche because of its out-of-the-box music.

    That's not to say I don't think there aren't other aspects worth mentioning. On the contrary, the characters are a colourful bunch, both on the good side with Natalya, Zukovsky and Wade, as well as on the baddie side, with Alec, Boris, Ourumov and especially the phenomenally insane Xenia Onatopp. Famke Janssen steals the show, though the entire cast is a fantastic ensemble. Much like a stellar football team, with Xenia as their top striker.

    Including several impressive stunts and a well-paced plot, Pierce's debut is exciting throughout, with the man himself succesfully inhabiting the Bond persona from the get-go. It's tough to pick an absolute favourite moment, but the pre-title sequence with Bond and Alec teaming up to infiltrate a Soviet chemical weapons facility is 007's last stroll behind the Iron Curtain and it's an absolute cracker.

    GG's rating: 4.5/5
  • Posts: 6,975
    You were going great guns GG, until you came to
    GE! 🤣🤣
    QOS and OP are two cracking Bond films, so much to enjoy and both high on my listing!
    And then there's GE, which has THE most annoying set of characters in one Bond film ( and that includes Ol' woodenchops Brossa!)
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    Mathis1 wrote: »
    You were going great guns GG, until you came to
    GE! 🤣🤣
    QOS and OP are two cracking Bond films, so much to enjoy and both high on my listing!
    And then there's GE, which has THE most annoying set of characters in one Bond film ( and that includes Ol' woodenchops Brossa!)

    You took the words right out of my keyboard.
  • Goldeneye having the most annoying amount of characters in a Bond film? Sacrilege.
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    Posts: 6,838
    Haha @Mathis1, I figured you’d give me a hard time for my GE love, but if GE and TWINE are the only ones we disagree on, I think we’ll survive ;)

    I didn’t know your dislike for GE was that close to Mathis’s, @Thunderfinger, hope you enjoyed the rest though :)

    The remaining entries are FRWL, TB, OHMSS, TLD, LTK and CR, I hope that’s a top 6 most of us can live with ;)
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    GoldenGun wrote: »
    Haha @Mathis1, I figured you’d give me a hard time for my GE love, but if GE and TWINE are the only ones we disagree on, I think we’ll survive ;)

    I didn’t know your dislike for GE was that close to Mathis’s, @Thunderfinger, hope you enjoyed the rest though :)

    The remaining entries are FRWL, TB, OHMSS, TLD, LTK and CR, I hope that’s a top 6 most of us can live with ;)

    I enjoy it all, whatever the order.
  • Posts: 6,975
    GoldenGun wrote: »
    Haha @Mathis1, I figured you’d give me a hard time for my GE love, but if GE and TWINE are the only ones we disagree on, I think we’ll survive ;)

    I didn’t know your dislike for GE was that close to Mathis’s, @Thunderfinger, hope you enjoyed the rest though :)

    The remaining entries are FRWL, TB, OHMSS, TLD, LTK and CR, I hope that’s a top 6 most of us can live with ;)

    I most certainly can get on board with that remaining 6! And I can forgive you your GE following since we both are Dalton fans!
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    Posts: 6,838
    A lot of Dalton praise coming up soon, that’s for sure ;)
  • Posts: 6,975
    GoldenGun wrote: »
    A lot of Dalton praise coming up soon, that’s for sure ;)

    Excellent!!
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    Posts: 6,838
    6. THUNDERBALL (1965, T. Young)

    A Sean Connery in top form, surrounded by the ultimate femme fatale Luciana Paluzzi, by the stunning Claudine Auger and by eye-patched Largo and his Golden Grotto sharks, TB is what I consider Bond at his archetypical best.

    The DB5, the jetpack, the SPECTRE meeting, the underwater action, the sparkling dialogue, the Ken Adam sets and John Barry score, it's all there, with a villain castle in France at the start followed by the exoticism of the Bahamas later on, TB is the ultimate all-inclusive formulaic Bond adventure.

    I realise the underwater stuff isn't quite to everyone's fancy because it is admittedly not exactly what you'd call fast-paced, though as an admirer of ocean set goings-on I adore these scenes as well as the film's largely aquatic atmosphere.

    To sum up my feelings towards TB, if I'm thinking of that typical 1960's larger-than-life Bond look and feel that every spoof/homage tries to replicate, I think of this film.

    GG's rating: 5/5

    5. CASINO ROYALE (2006, M. Campbell)

    Personally, I consider true cinematic magic, a few exceptions aside, something of the 21st century. Modern cinema, how technically advanced it might be, just lacks a certain charm for me. Maybe also atmosphere. CR is nevertheless, Bond's equivalent of some of those exceptions. I remember being impressed back in 2006, and I still am now.

    A return to a more grounded approach, while thankfully (loosely) adapting Fleming's first novel, was a masterstroke. Back were the beautiful locations (Prague, Bahamas, Venice and Karlovy Vary doubling for Montenegro), back was the interesting and eloquent co-star (Eva Green), back was fine dialogue and an engaging plot and back were the impressive action scenes.

    I'd also argue, and I imagine I could be in a minority here, CR has one of the strongest climaxes of the series: personal stakes, a striking background location and Bond wielding a silenced Walther throughout the entire shootout. A fitting finale to Bond's best outing since cinematic magic became a rarity.

    GG's rating: 5/5
  • Posts: 6,975
    Nice one @GoldenGun, With the re-release of all the Bond movies starting this week, these are two that are high on my list that I want to see again on the big screen, particularly the latter, as I will never forget my first viewing of it, CR was an instant classic! Glorious Bond film!
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    edited April 2022 Posts: 6,838
    Thanks @Mathis1 !

    I can’t get enough of either of these two films :)
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    edited April 2022 Posts: 6,838
    4. FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE (1963, T. Young)

    FRWL is a film that's best compared to fine-dining. Every aspect, ingredient if you will, is noticeable but none of them overpower the other, instead they compliment eachother. FRWL is all about finding the right balance. And just like fine-dining, it takes its time.

    A good exmaple of said balance are the characters, eccentric and unforgettable, but never over-the-top. Red Grant is one of the best Bond baddies, he's no metal-toothed giant or doesn't have a hat that kills you, but he's not YOLT's Hans either. Stay clear of his watch.

    Other memorable characters are Kerim Bey, Tania, Klebb or Kronsteen. A fine collection of co-stars to compliment Sean Connery's elegant, cultivated, citizen of the world that is established here. Long before the days of obligatory (and preposterous) product placement, this Bond knows his stuff; the right wines, figs for breakfast, coffee 'very very black' or 'medium sweet'. It's all there, in the details.

    Another aspect that I always loved about this outing is the spy atmosphere amidst these gorgeous locations: Istanbul at the start, Venice at the end, with a tense trip through Yugoslavia on the Orient Express in between. It's spy fun at its very best.

    FRWL is not the film that aims for you to yell: 'Hell yeah!', it's a film that satisfies you in the long run. Comparable to that moment when you're having an espresso after a delicious meal, thinking to yourself: 'This was excellent.'

    GG's rating: 5/5

    3. ON HER MAJESTY'S SECRET SERVICE (1969, P. Hunt)

    By now I suppose most fans are pretty much in agreement that everything in OHMSS works perfectly. Except for Bond himself. Still at the bottom of most Bond actors rankings that I come across, George Lazenby remains an underrated 007.

    I, for one, wouldn't put him near the bottom though, as I consider George to be excellent throughout what is already one of the best Bond films. Inexperienced as he must have been, George manages to make Bond a bit softer and much more vulnerable in what might as well be the first ever action-oriented film that left its protagonist heartbroken seconds before the credits roll.

    That final scene is the most emotional moment in the entire series for me, and as much as a certain amount of Lazenby detractors cannot understand why some fans claim he did a wonderful job, I just cannot understand how you can't give him top marks for that phenomenal end scene.

    As for the rest of the film, as stated earlier, I struggle to find an aspect that I don't like. The co-stars are all fabulous with Diana Rigg creating the ultimate Bond girl, while charming rogues Savalas and Ferzetti play 'who's the baddest man in town'.

    Complimented by a marvellous John Barry score, beautiful Alpine landscapes, spectacular action scenes and an engaging romance, OHMSS is a landmark (Bond) film on all accounts.

    GG's rating: 5/5
  • Posts: 6,975
    I wouldnt put George at the bottom! He carries himself well in the role, considering his lack of experience! Everything else works perfectly, so he was in good company! I dont believe Connery would have worked here, and maybe its special because of the one-offs..... Hunt, Laz, Bond marrying, downer of an ending, and the tropes we expect were turned up to 11, locations, regulars, action, music, which means it is still my number 1 Bond movie!
    FRWL, for me, is still Connerys finest hour as 007, am hoping to see it on the big screen on Tuesday, really looking forward to it!
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    Posts: 6,838
    I agree on both accounts @Mathis1!

    Lazenby is the only Bond that would have worked for OHMSS.

    And FRLW is also my favourite of the Connery Bonds, even though TB is a close second.
  • SIS_HQSIS_HQ At the Vauxhall Headquarters
    edited April 2022 Posts: 3,405
    I really agree with you @Mathis1
    Me too, I wouldn't put him at the bottom either.
    He's convincing to bring out the human side of Bond, and he's also good in fight scenes.
    The romance between him and Diana Rigg was perfect, and he works well with Telly Savalas.
    On Her Majesty's Secret Service is my favorite film.
    True, I don't think Connery would have worked in this film either.
    Everything in the film works, and all of them are great.

    From Russia With Love was Bond's answer to Le Carre and Smiley. Pure suspense, realistic espionage and spy thriller. For those saying that Bond was unbelievable as a spy or his films, they should watch this, this proves that Bond can do serious spying. It also has one of the best villains in Red Grant, Kronsteen and Rosa Klebb. Yes every detail was perfect, and this film was very fleming, each of the words written in the book was reflected well here.

    Great ranking! @GoldenGun 👍
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    Posts: 6,838
    Glad you’re enjoying it @MI6HQ !
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    Posts: 6,838
    2. LICENCE TO KILL (1989, J. Glen)

    I was musing about which of the Dalton films I wanted to put on top, and quite frankly it could have been either of them. But choices had to be made and I went for his first one. That being said, they make up a great duology. TLD is the elegant Cold War spy thriller, while LTK is the straightforward action-packed adrenalin rush.

    I see more and more people appreciate this entry now than ever before. Probably because Craig's tenure shines a new light on the Dalton era as the brooding hero has become much more en vogue. But I've always been a big fan, even back when Dalton's films were frowned upon as too serious and humourless.

    There is a difference between the two though, while Dalton also portrays Bond as a more relatable person with real emotions, and while his Bond, especially in this entry, is personally affected by the plot, Dalton's films nevertheless remain unapologetically true to Bond's cinematic hallmarks. I love how Desmond's Q pops up here, despite it making no sense, it gives LTK some moments of lightheartedness amidst all the revenge-taking, and its Desmond's finest hour in the role for me.

    There is much more to this film than "the Pinnacle of Q" of course. Dalton plays 007 with intensity and delivers one of the best of Bond performances. Subtle touches like Bond's weary sigh post-climax, leaning against a rock while overlooking the battlefield of his revenge, are characteristic for Dalton's more layered take on Bond.

    As for 007's co-stars, Pam Bouvier, the main Bond girl here, is one of the very best: competent, alluring, and one of the smartest Bond beauties of the franchise. The villain collection, lead by an impressively menacing Franz Sanchez, are a colourful bunch too, with a hilarious yuppie accountant in Truman-Lodge, Benicio Del Toro's ruthless assassin Dario, sleezy Milton Krest and double-crossing Heller this is, rather than a horde of crazy madmen, a true army of opportunists, giving LTK a sense of real danger.

    LTK is impressive, both from a story-telling perspective, giving Bond an emotional journey while also relying on his wits to get the job done; as well as on the action, with impressive stunts throughout the film, ending with the best climax of the series: the tanker truck chase.

    I'll recognise some viewers might find Bond chasing Latin American drug traffickers a bit too much 'Miami Vice' and I can see their point. I myself am a huge Miami Vice fan though, so I don't mind really mind that however. If anything, it makes me love this one even more.

    GG's rating: 5+/5

    1. THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS (1987, J. Glen)

    If there has ever been a Bond film that strikes the perfect balance between Fleming-inspired spy fiction and the imaginative escapism of the cinematic Bond franchise it is this film. In no small part thanks to the tremendous performance of its main star: Timothy Dalton, who can convey more emotions with one glance than many others can with an uninterrupted monologue. Dalton portrays Bond as a capable, smart, yet also sophisticated spy. There is an elegance to this 007, yet he's also a believable spy/assassin.

    Paired with the ultimate likeable-citizen-caught-up-in-the-wrong-scenario Kara Milovy, charismatic but untrustworthy Georgi Koskov, eclectic Kamran Shah, Soviet general in full perestroika mode Leonid Pushkin, silent killer with his own song Necros and the bully-gone-arms dealer Brad Whitaker, TLD is full of amusing characters, yet the very best co-star is Thomas Wheatley as Saunders. We'd had to wait until Mathis in QOS before Bond actually has a developed storyline with one of his colleagues again. It makes the death of Saunders the most touching one since Tracy back in OHMSS.

    TLD warrants its top finish also due to its excellent Cold War atmosphere. Bond has to find a way across the Czechoslovak-Austrian border on two occasions, for Koskov early on in what is probably the best scene in the series, and for himself and Kara later on, after a spectacular Aston Martin / cello case chase. All of this is accompanied by John Barry's greatest 007 score, a score that incorporates no less than three different original songs, all distincly belonging in the 80's, and that's just the way I like my music.

    I often read that apart from the villains, who I really like as stated above, the Afghanistan segment is one of the elements some fans can't get into. For me personally though, that is not issue at all. While the first part in Central Europe is Cold War / Iron Curtain tension at its best, the second part in Morocco and Afghanistan has a romantic, sweeping grand-scale vibe to it, with cinematographer Alec Mills catching desert sunrises as if he's shooting for David Lean.

    Quite clearly TLD makes no mistakes for this viewer. It has everything I look for and more, and it delivers the perfect framework for my favourite actor to shine in at his very brightest.

    GG's rating: 5+/5
  • Posts: 6,975
    Bravo @GoldenGun, couldn't have put it better myself! A perfect double bill, and Bond at his best!
    The re-issues in the cinema at the moment (Goldfinger is tonights, I do hope there isnt a repeat of the non show of FRWL last week!!), its these two Bond films I really want to see again on the big screen! August can't come quick enough!
  • goldenswissroyalegoldenswissroyale Switzerland
    Posts: 4,410
    This was a good read @GoldenGun
  • Junglist_1985Junglist_1985 Los Angeles
    edited May 2022 Posts: 1,007
    Nice review!
    Agree on the Morocco/Afghanistan parts - I think it provides an epic/sweeping conclusion to TLD. Very beautifully shot.
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    edited May 2022 Posts: 6,838
    Thanks a lot for the feedback fellas! It's nice to know some of you took the time to read it :)

    Edit: @Mathis1 Are there re-issues of the Dalton films on the big screen coming in August somewhere? :-O
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