Complete and Detailed Bond Movie Ranking

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Comments

  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    edited June 2016 Posts: 6,779
    TWINE is one of those films I will always love. It was my first Bond film, it turned me into a Bond fan and eventually into a cinephile.

    It all started with The World Is Not Enough. So for all its flaws, it's a special film for me. For the moment I'd put it at 10 or 11.
  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 on fb and ajb
    edited October 2016 Posts: 9,020
    I have never watched as many Bond films than in 2015 and 2016.
    In 2015 I have seen 39 films total and in 2016 also 39 including NSNA and CR67.

    13 viewings of Spectre at the cinema alone included.

    The repercussions of this: I find it more and more difficult to uphold my ranking that has been pretty clear for 20 years (with the occasional fluctuation when a new one came along).

    This is what my ranking pretty much looks like since 2006, (without QOS, SF, SP) I put them where they are now in my ranking.

    SP
    1 GE
    2 TLD
    3 OHMSS
    4 CR
    5 OP
    6 FRWL
    7 GF
    QOS
    8 TND
    9 LTK
    10 FYEO
    11 DAD
    12 TSWLM
    13 MR
    14 DN
    15 TB
    16 YOLT
    17 AVTAK
    18 TWINE
    19 LALD
    20 TMWTGG
    21 DAF
    SF

    What really changed since last year is DAF escaping the bottom and LALD going up as well.

    This is my current ranking for 2016 which is almost the same.
    1 SP
    2 GE
    3 TLD
    4 OHMSS
    5 CR
    6 OP
    7 FRWL
    8 GF
    9 QOS
    10 TND
    11 LTK
    12 FYEO
    13 DAD
    14 TSWLM
    15 MR
    16 DAF
    17 LALD

    18 DN
    19 TB
    20 YOLT
    21 AVTAK
    22 TMWTGG
    23 TWINE
    24 SF

    Having watched quite a many Bond films lately (last couple of months) I suddenly experience changes in my perception of some films which make me seriously doubt my current ranking is still valid.
    Yes, I am a bit obsessed with ranking the films, so it's important to me.

    GE and TLD: Both are the most important Bond films in my life as TLD made me into the Bond fanatic I am today and GE was THE Bond experience for me (Age 21 in 1995).
    I love both films endlessly and I also feel, that they really do belong in any Top 10.

    Timothy Dalton, naturally, was and still is my favourite Bond actor. Having watched TLD and LTK only a couple of days ago I now think I have to re-think where they stand in my ranking.
    TLD may be my favourite after all, but I feel I can't put it over GE, because the Brosnan film is just this itsy bitsy tiny bit better for me.
    LTK though at No 11 seems once more too low, I did have it up to 8 at one point. Now I think it should permanently occupy a place between 7 and 9.

    DN: It never really has been higher than the middle for me, but since watching it twice two weeks ago I suddenly started to absolutely love it. It now seems to be as perfect as Goldfinger. The film is stunningly beautiful. It should be in my Top 10.

    OHMSS: The more years that go by, the more I believe and feel that this is the best ever made Bond film. Not even Lazenby can prevent it from being the best, in fact, maybe because of him it is the best. Sacrilege? Maybe, but why should Connery be untouchable?
    Lazenby was the perfect choice for OHMSS. Since many years I'm tempted to put it at the top.

    DAF and LALD: I had them near or at the bottom for years, well decades now. I was very prejudiced against DAF. I never liked it, the first viewing went horribly in the early 90s when I discovered all the older films. It is also one of my least watched films. Without the many viewing I had of it in 2015/2016 it would even be the least watched one together with SF, NSNA and TMWTGG.
    Now I ABSOLUTELY LOVE DAF. It is my No 1 re-watchable Bond. I could view it every week easily. But where to rank it. It still is far from the best. It is currently at No 16 sitting just in front of LALD which also went up for similar reasons. But it's quite possible it will bypass spot 14, 13 and even 12 in the future.

    The top 6 seemed always to be set in stone GE TLD OHMSS CR OP (FRWL/GF). The two Connery's always swap places since ages.
    Now I'm not so sure anymore, to be honest CR feels to be too high now.
    I was toying with those 6 (7) movies around a bit and I have come up with this:

    Possible Spectre rankings in italic lettering.
    1 OHMSS
    Spectre
    2 GE
    3 TLD
    Spectre
    4 OP
    5 GF
    6 FRWL
    7 CR

    LTK, TND, FYEO, QOS etc...

    Call me crazy, but this drives me insane :P
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    Go see a psychiatrist, and tell him about those james Bond film ranking problems. I am sure he gets similar patients every day.
  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 on fb and ajb
    Posts: 9,020
    Who is the MI6 Community psychiatrist? @Thunderfinger
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    it doesn t take one to not know one.
  • Mendes4LyfeMendes4Lyfe The long road ahead
    edited October 2016 Posts: 8,081
    I have never watched as many Bond films than in 2015 and 2016.
    In 2015 I have seen 39 films total and in 2016 also 39 including NSNA and CR67.

    13 viewings of Spectre at the cinema alone included.

    The repercussions of this: I find it more and more difficult to uphold my ranking that has been pretty clear for 20 years (with the occasional fluctuation when a new one came along).

    This is what my ranking pretty much looks like since 2006, (without QOS, SF, SP) I put them where they are now in my ranking.

    SP
    1 GE
    2 TLD
    3 OHMSS
    4 CR
    5 OP
    6 FRWL
    7 GF
    QOS
    8 TND
    9 LTK
    10 FYEO
    11 DAD
    12 TSWLM
    13 MR
    14 DN
    15 TB
    16 YOLT
    17 AVTAK
    18 TWINE
    19 LALD
    20 TMWTGG
    21 DAF
    SF

    What really changed since last year is DAF escaping the bottom and LALD going up as well.

    This is my current ranking for 2016 which is almost the same.
    1 SP
    2 GE
    3 TLD
    4 OHMSS
    5 CR
    6 OP
    7 FRWL
    8 GF
    9 QOS
    10 TND
    11 LTK
    12 FYEO
    13 DAD
    14 TSWLM
    15 MR
    16 DAF
    17 LALD

    18 DN
    19 TB
    20 YOLT
    21 AVTAK
    22 TMWTGG
    23 TWINE
    24 SF

    Having watched quite a many Bond films lately (last couple of months) I suddenly experience changes in my perception of some films which make me seriously doubt my current ranking is still valid.
    Yes, I am a bit obsessed with ranking the films, so it's important to me.

    GE and TLD: Both are the most important Bond films in my life as TLD made me into the Bond fanatic I am today and GE was THE Bond experience for me (Age 21 in 1995).
    I love both films endlessly and I also feel, that they really do belong in any Top 10.

    Timothy Dalton, naturally, was and still is my favourite Bond actor. Having watched TLD and LTK only a couple of days ago I now think I have to re-think where they stand in my ranking.
    TLD may be my favourite after all, but I feel I can't put it over GE, because the Brosnan film is just this itsy bitsy tiny bit better for me.
    LTK though at No 11 seems once more too low, I did have it up to 8 at one point. Now I think it should permanently occupy a place between 7 and 9.

    DN: It never really has been higher than the middle for me, but since watching it twice two weeks ago I suddenly started to absolutely love it. It now seems to be as perfect as Goldfinger. The film is stunningly beautiful. It should be in my Top 10.

    OHMSS: The more years that go by, the more I believe and feel that this is the best ever made Bond film. Not even Lazenby can prevent it from being the best, in fact, maybe because of him it is the best. Sacrilege? Maybe, but why should Connery be untouchable?
    Lazenby was the perfect choice for OHMSS. Since many years I'm tempted to put it at the top.

    DAF and LALD: I had them near or at the bottom for years, well decades now. I was very prejudiced against DAF. I never liked it, the first viewing went horribly in the early 90s when I discovered all the older films. It is also one of my least watched films. Without the many viewing I had of it in 2015/2016 it would even be the least watched one together with SF, NSNA and TMWTGG.
    Now I ABSOLUTELY LOVE DAF. It is my No 1 re-watchable Bond. I could view it every week easily. But where to rank it. It still is far from the best. It is currently at No 16 sitting just in front of LALD which also went up for similar reasons. But it's quite possible it will bypass spot 14, 13 and even 12 in the future.

    The top 6 seemed always to be set in stone GE TLD OHMSS CR OP (FRWL/GF). The two Connery's always swap places since ages.
    Now I'm not so sure anymore, to be honest CR feels to be too high now.
    I was toying with those 6 (7) movies around a bit and I have come up with this:

    Possible Spectre rankings in italic lettering.
    1 OHMSS
    Spectre
    2 GE
    3 TLD
    Spectre
    4 OP
    5 GF
    6 FRWL
    7 CR

    LTK, TND, FYEO, QOS etc...

    Call me crazy, but this drives me insane :P

    All the changes you have made seem like positive ones IMO. I too have had the feeling like CR is slightly overrated lately. There are a lot of unnecessary "Bond begins" stuff which didn't really serve a purpose. Plus, I feel that the film is acting out just to be different slightly, rather than because it's actually earned. It seems slightly too moody, too stern at times. I mean, I still love the film, but it's no OHMSS if you ask me.
  • edited October 2016 Posts: 15,801
    I have never watched as many Bond films than in 2015 and 2016.
    In 2015 I have seen 39 films total and in 2016 also 39 including NSNA and CR67.

    13 viewings of Spectre at the cinema alone included.

    The repercussions of this: I find it more and more difficult to uphold my ranking that has been pretty clear for 20 years (with the occasional fluctuation when a new one came along).

    This is what my ranking pretty much looks like since 2006, (without QOS, SF, SP) I put them where they are now in my ranking.

    SP
    1 GE
    2 TLD
    3 OHMSS
    4 CR
    5 OP
    6 FRWL
    7 GF
    QOS
    8 TND
    9 LTK
    10 FYEO
    11 DAD
    12 TSWLM
    13 MR
    14 DN
    15 TB
    16 YOLT
    17 AVTAK
    18 TWINE
    19 LALD
    20 TMWTGG
    21 DAF
    SF

    What really changed since last year is DAF escaping the bottom and LALD going up as well.

    This is my current ranking for 2016 which is almost the same.
    1 SP
    2 GE
    3 TLD
    4 OHMSS
    5 CR
    6 OP
    7 FRWL
    8 GF
    9 QOS
    10 TND
    11 LTK
    12 FYEO
    13 DAD
    14 TSWLM
    15 MR
    16 DAF
    17 LALD

    18 DN
    19 TB
    20 YOLT
    21 AVTAK
    22 TMWTGG
    23 TWINE
    24 SF

    Having watched quite a many Bond films lately (last couple of months) I suddenly experience changes in my perception of some films which make me seriously doubt my current ranking is still valid.
    Yes, I am a bit obsessed with ranking the films, so it's important to me.

    GE and TLD: Both are the most important Bond films in my life as TLD made me into the Bond fanatic I am today and GE was THE Bond experience for me (Age 21 in 1995).
    I love both films endlessly and I also feel, that they really do belong in any Top 10.

    Timothy Dalton, naturally, was and still is my favourite Bond actor. Having watched TLD and LTK only a couple of days ago I now think I have to re-think where they stand in my ranking.
    TLD may be my favourite after all, but I feel I can't put it over GE, because the Brosnan film is just this itsy bitsy tiny bit better for me.
    LTK though at No 11 seems once more too low, I did have it up to 8 at one point. Now I think it should permanently occupy a place between 7 and 9.

    DN: It never really has been higher than the middle for me, but since watching it twice two weeks ago I suddenly started to absolutely love it. It now seems to be as perfect as Goldfinger. The film is stunningly beautiful. It should be in my Top 10.

    OHMSS: The more years that go by, the more I believe and feel that this is the best ever made Bond film. Not even Lazenby can prevent it from being the best, in fact, maybe because of him it is the best. Sacrilege? Maybe, but why should Connery be untouchable?
    Lazenby was the perfect choice for OHMSS. Since many years I'm tempted to put it at the top.

    DAF and LALD: I had them near or at the bottom for years, well decades now. I was very prejudiced against DAF. I never liked it, the first viewing went horribly in the early 90s when I discovered all the older films. It is also one of my least watched films. Without the many viewing I had of it in 2015/2016 it would even be the least watched one together with SF, NSNA and TMWTGG.
    Now I ABSOLUTELY LOVE DAF. It is my No 1 re-watchable Bond. I could view it every week easily. But where to rank it. It still is far from the best. It is currently at No 16 sitting just in front of LALD which also went up for similar reasons. But it's quite possible it will bypass spot 14, 13 and even 12 in the future.

    The top 6 seemed always to be set in stone GE TLD OHMSS CR OP (FRWL/GF). The two Connery's always swap places since ages.
    Now I'm not so sure anymore, to be honest CR feels to be too high now.
    I was toying with those 6 (7) movies around a bit and I have come up with this:

    Possible Spectre rankings in italic lettering.
    1 OHMSS
    Spectre
    2 GE
    3 TLD
    Spectre
    4 OP
    5 GF
    6 FRWL
    7 CR

    LTK, TND, FYEO, QOS etc...

    Call me crazy, but this drives me insane :P

    All the changes you have made seem like positive ones IMO. I too have had the feeling like CR is slightly overrated lately. There are a lot of unnecessary "Bond begins" stuff which didn't really serve a purpose. Plus, I feel that the film is acting out just to be different slightly, rather than because it's actually earned. It seems slightly too moody, too stern at times. I mean, I still love the film, but it's no OHMSS if you ask me.

    I'm feeling at the 10 year mark now, it's not quite holding up as well as OHMSS, or FRWL consistently does. Probably in part due to the Bond origin story gimmick. It's solid, and I can certainly see why many rank it as their number one, but for me OHMSS has everything a Bond film needs. It hits the spot every time. Same with FRWL and GF. Same with TLD and LTK.
    I think had the Craig Bonds reverted to stand alone entries after CR, I'd appreciate it more. But no, they went the Dark Knight route of having a story arc.
    When I'm in the mood for a "Bond film"...which is often, I tend to go for the likes of GF, TB, OHMSS, DAF, LALD, TSWLM, FYEO, OP, AVTAK, TLD , LTK etc. I have to be in the mood for a "Craig era Bond" to enjoy CR, if that makes sense. In another 10 years time, I imagine I'd probably pop in SPECTRE more often than CR just for the simple fact it does embrace the Bond formula. It could eventually make it's way to my number one spot for the Craig films (just for the GB placement alone). I find lately I overlook plot holes, poorly written villains, limp endings, etc, over blatant disregard for beloved elements (such as the GB, Moneypenny and Q sequences, and Bond, dare I say, getting laid at the film's end) any day of the week.
    What makes me rank films like FRWL, GF, LALD, and TSWLM so high is that although adhering to the tried and true formula, they are all completely different films. The formula is in LALD as much as it is in TB, but the tone, look, feel is completely different. Yet, it is very much a James Bond movie. Same with FYEO, and TLD.
    It may soon be time for me to go back to that other thread and re-do my rankings this year for the 300th time..........
  • Mendes4LyfeMendes4Lyfe The long road ahead
    Posts: 8,081
    ToTheRight wrote: »
    I have never watched as many Bond films than in 2015 and 2016.
    In 2015 I have seen 39 films total and in 2016 also 39 including NSNA and CR67.

    13 viewings of Spectre at the cinema alone included.

    The repercussions of this: I find it more and more difficult to uphold my ranking that has been pretty clear for 20 years (with the occasional fluctuation when a new one came along).

    This is what my ranking pretty much looks like since 2006, (without QOS, SF, SP) I put them where they are now in my ranking.

    SP
    1 GE
    2 TLD
    3 OHMSS
    4 CR
    5 OP
    6 FRWL
    7 GF
    QOS
    8 TND
    9 LTK
    10 FYEO
    11 DAD
    12 TSWLM
    13 MR
    14 DN
    15 TB
    16 YOLT
    17 AVTAK
    18 TWINE
    19 LALD
    20 TMWTGG
    21 DAF
    SF

    What really changed since last year is DAF escaping the bottom and LALD going up as well.

    This is my current ranking for 2016 which is almost the same.
    1 SP
    2 GE
    3 TLD
    4 OHMSS
    5 CR
    6 OP
    7 FRWL
    8 GF
    9 QOS
    10 TND
    11 LTK
    12 FYEO
    13 DAD
    14 TSWLM
    15 MR
    16 DAF
    17 LALD

    18 DN
    19 TB
    20 YOLT
    21 AVTAK
    22 TMWTGG
    23 TWINE
    24 SF

    Having watched quite a many Bond films lately (last couple of months) I suddenly experience changes in my perception of some films which make me seriously doubt my current ranking is still valid.
    Yes, I am a bit obsessed with ranking the films, so it's important to me.

    GE and TLD: Both are the most important Bond films in my life as TLD made me into the Bond fanatic I am today and GE was THE Bond experience for me (Age 21 in 1995).
    I love both films endlessly and I also feel, that they really do belong in any Top 10.

    Timothy Dalton, naturally, was and still is my favourite Bond actor. Having watched TLD and LTK only a couple of days ago I now think I have to re-think where they stand in my ranking.
    TLD may be my favourite after all, but I feel I can't put it over GE, because the Brosnan film is just this itsy bitsy tiny bit better for me.
    LTK though at No 11 seems once more too low, I did have it up to 8 at one point. Now I think it should permanently occupy a place between 7 and 9.

    DN: It never really has been higher than the middle for me, but since watching it twice two weeks ago I suddenly started to absolutely love it. It now seems to be as perfect as Goldfinger. The film is stunningly beautiful. It should be in my Top 10.

    OHMSS: The more years that go by, the more I believe and feel that this is the best ever made Bond film. Not even Lazenby can prevent it from being the best, in fact, maybe because of him it is the best. Sacrilege? Maybe, but why should Connery be untouchable?
    Lazenby was the perfect choice for OHMSS. Since many years I'm tempted to put it at the top.

    DAF and LALD: I had them near or at the bottom for years, well decades now. I was very prejudiced against DAF. I never liked it, the first viewing went horribly in the early 90s when I discovered all the older films. It is also one of my least watched films. Without the many viewing I had of it in 2015/2016 it would even be the least watched one together with SF, NSNA and TMWTGG.
    Now I ABSOLUTELY LOVE DAF. It is my No 1 re-watchable Bond. I could view it every week easily. But where to rank it. It still is far from the best. It is currently at No 16 sitting just in front of LALD which also went up for similar reasons. But it's quite possible it will bypass spot 14, 13 and even 12 in the future.

    The top 6 seemed always to be set in stone GE TLD OHMSS CR OP (FRWL/GF). The two Connery's always swap places since ages.
    Now I'm not so sure anymore, to be honest CR feels to be too high now.
    I was toying with those 6 (7) movies around a bit and I have come up with this:

    Possible Spectre rankings in italic lettering.
    1 OHMSS
    Spectre
    2 GE
    3 TLD
    Spectre
    4 OP
    5 GF
    6 FRWL
    7 CR

    LTK, TND, FYEO, QOS etc...

    Call me crazy, but this drives me insane :P

    All the changes you have made seem like positive ones IMO. I too have had the feeling like CR is slightly overrated lately. There are a lot of unnecessary "Bond begins" stuff which didn't really serve a purpose. Plus, I feel that the film is acting out just to be different slightly, rather than because it's actually earned. It seems slightly too moody, too stern at times. I mean, I still love the film, but it's no OHMSS if you ask me.

    I'm feeling at the 10 year mark now, it's not quite holding up as well as OHMSS, or FRWL consistently does. Probably in part due to the Bond origin story gimmick. It's solid, and I can certainly see why many rank it as their number one, but for me OHMSS has everything a Bond film needs. It hits the spot every time. Same with FRWL and GF. Same with TLD and LTK.
    I think had the Craig Bonds reverted to stand alone entries after CR, I'd appreciate it more. But no, they went the Dark Knight route of having a story arc.
    When I'm in the mood for a "Bond film"...which is often, I tend to go for the likes of GF, TB, OHMSS, DAF, LALD, TSWLM, FYEO, OP, AVTAK, TLD , LTK etc. I have to be in the mood for a "Craig era Bond" to enjoy CR, if that makes sense. In another 10 years time, I imagine I'd probably pop in SPECTRE more often than CR just for the simple fact it does embrace the Bond formula. It could eventually make it's way to my number one spot for the Craig films (just for the GB placement alone). I find lately I overlook plot holes, poorly written villains, limp endings, etc, over blatant disregard for beloved elements (such as the GB, Moneypenny and Q sequences, and Bond, dare I say, getting laid at the film's end) any day of the week.
    What makes me rank films like FRWL, GF, LALD, and TSWLM so high is that although adhering to the tried and true formula, they are all completely different films. The formula is in LALD as much as it is in TB, but the tone, look, feel is completely different. Yet, it is very much a James Bond movie. Same with FYEO, and TLD.
    It may soon be time for me to go back to that other thread and re-do my rankings this year for the 300th time..........

    Wow. Everything expressed here is 100% correct IMO. The big "drop the ball" moment of the Craig era was the decision to continue where CR left off. That was one break from tradition too far, and ultimately what laid the foundations for the current predicament the franchise now finds itself in, tied up in narrative knots.

    You're also right that Bond films, for the most part, are traditionally comfortable with being little more that popcorn entertainment. In the Craig era, it seems like they're really quite ashamed of that label. Bond can't run down the street without being narrated by poetry anymore.
    I really love formula, structure and perspicuity when it comes to storytelling. That's one of the things that the Bond franchise has always had a pretty good understanding of - essentially just don't waste peoples time. PTS, TS, Bond receives mission, Bond heads out, etc. That's why Dr No is my favorite Bond film by far. The film is so simple, yet so elegant in how it just naturally unravels. No explosions needed, no personal conflict eating at the character. Just good old fashioned storytelling. In the Craig era, we couldn't be further from that concept. SPECTRE has so many strands, so many loose ends that the film almost collapses under it's own weight. I enjoy the film a lot as an honest attempt to do the formula right, but it is simply tasked with doing way to much, and is carrying to much baggage on it's shoulders. LALD is a great example of the carefree days, when nothing carried over and Bond lived from moment to moment.
  • M16_CartM16_Cart Craig fanboy?
    edited December 2016 Posts: 538
    my full james bond ranking list (december 2016)

    24. diamonds are forever (1971)

    it has the sights and sounds, but it does so many things wrong. it ignores the plot of the previous movie, despite wanting to be a sequel. it uses the standard bond formula, but lacks the substance of the 6 prior bond movies. has the worst female lead of the connery films. connery himself gives a begrudgingly complacent performance. i like the comical bond films, but connery didn't roll with the humor well

    23. the man with the golden gun (1974)

    christopher lee played a very good villain, but moore was a miscast for the role of a brutal assassin, and forced attempts to make him ruthless were corny. i loved the premise of dueling assassins, but it then resorted to the generic bond formula (with solar energy as the enemy). most of the film just consisted of random gag scenes. the tone was really inconsistent. it wanted to be serious in some parts, but it had way too much camp to take seriously.

    22. moonraker (1979)

    i loved jaws, drax and the evil lair, but that's only the last half-hour of the film. they needed to do something to get bond to the lair, so it just consisted of random scenes of bond following a breadcrumb trail. there was no real plot: just 90 minutes of boring filler to make the outerspace part look more interesting. it was just a watered down version of the spy who loved me. moore played his part well, and i also like the female lead, but it feels like a generic bond film purposed only with displaying cool film tech.

    21. a view to a kill (1985)

    moore was too old, but to worsen the issue, the female lead was half his age. max zorin and mayday were a great (weird) pair of villains, and the golden gate bridge scene was epic. but for every great scene there were several forgettable scenes. the story was generic goldfinger clone. the horse subplot that comprised the majority of the first hour was slow and boring. i loved the self-parodying humor, as well as its increased focus on action. it's the last classic bond film and an end of an era, but it was over-familiar, crossed the line and the series needed to go in a new direction.

    20. die another day (2002)

    i don't hate it as much as most bond fans do, and it's slightly underrated. i think the sci-fi, tech, invisible car, dna-changing, glass shattering-ring, fencing scene and ice fortress were all pretty cool. but this film didn't have much originality. every scene seemed to be borrowed from another bond film. the first act of the movie was good, but the 2nd and 3rd acts just lost focus and got silly. cgi isn't inherently bad, but some of it really was just awful.

    19. for your eyes only (1981)

    it avoids the excesses of the previous 5 bond films, but it doesn't seem to add anything new to the picture. it has boring villain, no gadgets and a female lead that is visibly averse to roger moore. i will say it has some of the best scenery in the series, and i love the element of suspense it has in embracing a slower, more-realistic bond. it doesn't do anything abhorrently bad, but it doesn't do anything great either.

    18. spectre (2015)

    i like the atmosphere, action and classic bond motifs of this one. it's fun to watch craig to react many nostalgic scenes in the franchise. madeline was a good love interest. fiennes is a good new m. but the films is unfocused, waltz was underutilized and comes off as a weak villain. the writing was awful. it actually copied austin powers with the brothers twist, and it ruined the whole Craig era by saying that this was the main cause of the previous events. it did a lot of things well, but didn't seem to excel in anything.

    17. the world is not enough (1999)

    this is a mixed bag for me. on one hand, i love that it's very unique. the villains in this one have a much different motive, dench gets more screentime and the plot is very complex, like a thriller/mystery. it has a nice industrial feel to it. brosnan offers up a much darker bond. but richards was a bad female lead and there was some really corny dialogue. worst of all, the directing. most of the scenes didn't evoke as much personality and emotion as they should have.

    16. tomorrow never dies (1997)

    this has some of the best action in the series and is very entertaining, but it's more of an action movie than a spy movie ; the plot was paper thin. bond's backstory with paris was interesting but doesn't go anywhere. i like how the media is the new villain, but carver was too hammy and his motives were too unrealistic even for fantasy standards. i love the gadgets in this one though ; remote controlled bmw remains one of my favorites.

    15. from russia with love (1963)

    on paper this is a great movie, but i find it somewhat boring. i love every part of the 30 minute section with the train. but the beginning is slow, the catfighting is overdone and it tries to introduce mini-climaxes after the climax. connery plays the role of a traditional male very well, and the female lead is one of the better ones for sure. i like how the plot in this one is unique and doesn't follow the bond formula.

    14. thunderball (1965)

    this movie has a lot of the bond classics. gadgets, plenty. suspense and action. spectre is shown here, and there's the classic board room meeting scenes. bond seduces beautiful women and beats the villain in poker. all of the bond tropes are really well. i love how bond finds his way out of danger with such aplomb. had there been a less predictable climax/ending and about 1/3 of the underwater footage was cut, it would easily be in my top 10.

    13. the spy who loved me (1977)

    the film could've had more originality, jettisoned the chase scene, had a better score and tightened up the first act, but nonetheless, this is the film that allowed moore to demonstrate that he was the true successor to connery. i love how this film is epic in its ambitions, does fantasy in a way that's not overly silly, and the female lead is actually not a sex object. jaws was one of the best henchmen. overall, this is a bond movie at its proudest.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    They don t play poker in TB that I am aware of.
  • w2bondw2bond is indeed a very rare breed
    Posts: 2,252
    So far so good except FRWL being so low. You'll come around
  • ForYourEyesOnlyForYourEyesOnly In the untained cradle of the heavens
    edited August 2017 Posts: 1,984
    After a few rewatches, reading a few blogs and just trying to reconsider things from different perspectives, I've come up with a rather different list than the one I had just two weeks ago in the no-details ranking thread. I ranked them first on instinct, then moved the films up and down based on comparisons between different areas (plot, dialogue, acting, score, etc.). Being forced to give reasons for your rankings does compel you change a few things.

    Virtually flawless

    1. Casino Royale (2006)

    Everything is excellent and well-balanced here. The theme song, acting, plot, action and dialogue are all of the highest calibre. Every part of the story is well, every twist and turn is intricately woven, and we've got a modern version of the original Bond book, but one that remains highly faithful to Fleming's premier creation. There's genuine tension in a lot of scenes and the fact that there's so many scenes you could consider the climax is a testament to that. At no point did I feel bored or detached from the film. It's the first Bond movie since OHMSS that really leaves an emotional mark. Everyone plays their part extremely well here — Daniel Craig, Eva Green, Mads Mikkelsen, you name it.

    While the sets lack the larger-than-life atmosphere of the Ken Adam designs, you'll note from my top picks that they aren't necessary. The sets here perfectly set out the atmosphere needed for their respective scenes. The only thing that isn't top-notch here is the score, but it's still good; it's not a glaring deficit or anything. It does away with the typical Bond formula, yet you walk away with the distinct feeling of having watched a Bond film. Still the ultimate 007 adventure in my book.

    2. Skyfall (2012)

    Most of what I said above applies here as well. The villain is even better than in CR and is a highlight of the film, even amongst all the other good things it has. We've had attempts at making a dark side to Bond before with Scaramanga and Trevelyan but Silva's is the closest to representing Bond's demons and manages to be both frightening and entertaining. The plot's noticeably weaker than CR and strains credibility somewhat, which for me leaves CR on top, but this is almost on par. Again, well-acted, good action and writing, with a special shout-out deserved for Roger Deakins' cinematography. SF succeeds in making the mission both personal and high-stakes for 007, all while travelling fearlessly into the relatively uncharted territory of Bond's past with a completely original story.

    3. From Russia With Love (1963)

    Part of the thing about my top entries are that they're not just good Bond movies, but excellent movies as a whole. If you dislike Bond and dislike camp you've a fair reason to dislike most of the other movies, but these top ones are brilliant as genuine spy thrillers and don't need to lean on established 007 formula to be brilliant. Excellent story of its own, despite a few pokes and prods at Dr No, and it is still very faithful to the book.

    Once again, the villains work their magic and manage to be both intimidating and reflective of the dark side of the spy world. Connery is flawless as 007 and Robert Shaw's Red Grant is the only character other than Silva who manages to convincingly be Bond's dark half. The only weaknesses are that the film has a slower pace which can cross into the territory of "too slow" at times, though it still manages to hold its suspense, and Daniella Bianchi, while not bad by any means, is hard-pressed to hold her own against the rest of the film's cast, which is top-notch.

    Barry's score here works wonders in setting the mood for the film and while FRWL is now dated like the rest of Connery's pictures, its strong roots in Cold War themes makes it far better contextualized than the rest of Connery's 007 adventures.

    Superior entries with modest issues

    4. On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969)

    This really should have been in the tier above because it also manages to be an excellent film while not relying on the Bond formula. The best things about the film are the cinematography and score, both of which are among the best in 007 history and set the atmosphere wonderfully. Right behind them are the cast and writing, which are exceptional with the notable and unfortunate exception of George Lazenby. He's tolerable after several rewatches, in part because he can at least handle some things (the action scenes and the more emotional scenes), but in general his acting is a clear weak link. Thankfully he's insured by all the good things in the film, which allow OHMSS to maintain its integrity at all times. It is consistent in its quality, and Lazenby does deserve credit for managing to pull off that final scene.

    Still, Lazenby's deficits are noticeable, along with that of the editing which has declined since Peter Hunt departed the role. On top of that, the pacing of the film is somewhat weaker than average considering its extraordinary length. Having rewatched this movie several times, I'm able to sit through it all without being bored but nonetheless I notice that it doesn't manage to hold its suspense as well as the above three entries, which is disappointing because otherwise the film itself doesn't drop in quality in its mid-section.

    5. GoldenEye (1995)

    We've always got to be charitable towards our first Bonds, and this was mine. I think today, it still holds up very well. The cast as a whole is good, and so is the acting. We've got good action and the feeling of traditional Bond despite Bond now being out of his element — this is the film that proved that Bond could survive after the Cold War. Some questions could be raised about the strength of the plot, especially in relation to Alec Trevelyan, and the plot and the film as a whole are admittedly formulaic but on the whole this film doesn't have any major deficits in the more important areas. This film was about bringing classic Bond into the modern world, which it did perfectly. The biggest letdown? Still the score. It just doesn't feel like Bond except during the tank chase.

    6. Octopussy (1983)

    I've always had a thing for Roger's 80's adventures. This movie has been panned quite a bit by critics but a number of fans are very generous towards it and I'm not ashamed to say I'm one of them. The film has a great score and atmosphere of adventure and danger, along with a good cast. It's a pity that Kamal Khan isn't afforded enough time to really develop himself, with him ultimately being mostly an accomplice to the far more over-acted General Orlov's plan. The late Louis Jourdan does a great job playing a more suave, back-seat type villain, however. I also get a kick out of watching his facial expressions when Bond humiliates him in the casino, or when he's trying to maneuver the plane at the end.

    I do have the same issues with the film that most people do, which is that it indulges a bit too much in the self-parodying — nowhere is this better seen than in the scene with the Tarzan call. I've never understood the criticism with the clown, though. It was an appropriate disguise that was contextually fitting for a scene that served as a great metaphor for the Cold War. On the other hand, a complaint about the complicated plot would be legitimate since the film doesn't give us enough time to tie everything together. Then again, the fast pace would be welcomed by some. Anyway, the other issue is that the film spends a bit too much time with filler scenes in India. The scenes in Germany are where it's at. Props to the crew for the excellent stuntwork and having Bond engage in a lot of actual spying in this one.

    7. Thunderball (1965)

    Of Connery's more traditional 007 outings, this is his best. The stakes are high, both the theme song and score are powerful and intense, and good ol' Sean plays Bond as well as ever. The cast as a whole is excellent, with Adolfo Celi playing one of the more notable villains in the Bond mythos in Emilio Largo and Fiona Volpe being another of 007's greatest foes (arguably eclipsing Largo himself). Her dancing with Bond while her gun-wielding henchmen surround them and take aim is still one of the best scenes ever. Domino is less of a standout in the pantheon of Bond girls but she still manages to take charge in the final act of the film very well. First Bond girl to outright save 007's ass. With a few rewatches, I've divested myself of complaints about the underwater scenes, but I can understand if the length of them is a bit of a turn-off for others. The plot is slightly weakened by the fact that we know what the villains are planning to do straight off the bat, although we still feel an imminent sense of danger with the whole "race against the clock" thing that the story has going on. Personally, my biggest complaint is with the choppy editing in the fight scenes. What is up with that?

    8. For Your Eyes Only (1981)

    Moore's most grounded adventure happens to be his second best. We've got strong characters, a strong plot, and good writing. The twist with the villain was actually surprising, unlike the one in Live and Let Die. Kristatos is excellent both when he appears to be Bond's ally and when he turns out to be a double agent. He's not over-the-top in any way and along with the highly realistic plot make this an excellent break from the pomp and parody that Moore is known for. Well, except for the PTS with Blofeld and the ending with Margaret Thatcher. Still, Melina Havelock is the first Bond girl who's a certified badass and she has a very good reason for being together with Bond, not to mention Carole Bouquet manages to have rather good chemistry with Roger Moore. And Columbo is still one of Bond's best allies to date.

    9. The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)

    Having just seen this again recently, I'm a bit sad to say it's no longer my favourite Moore film. It's certainly the best of the campy 70's flicks, but it's not as consistent as Moore's 80's adventures. For the first time ever, we've got a henchman who eclipses the villain — the terrifying Jaws steals the show from Curd Jurgens' rather anemic Karl Stromberg, who's saved only by a few good lines ("The funeral was at sea" is his best, though I have to give credit to Jurgens for his casual delivery of "Cancel transfer of twenty million dollars" which sometimes cracks me up).

    Moving on, we've got one of the best Bond themes, a wonderful larger-than-life setting thanks to the plot and Ken Adam's sets, and a good disco score from Marvin Hamlisch. Anya Amasova is a bit disappointing, though. She's intended to be Bond's equal but really, she's just given a few early wins over Bond to make us think that before she ends up being a typical damsel in distress. Barbara Bach's acting is also somewhat wanting, and I can't help but notice that the film's third act is considerably weaker than the first two with almost no sense of suspense or real danger (sorry, but the missile thing is overdone and the sense of threat was really underplayed in this one). At least until Bond encounters Stromberg and leaves him forever holding his piece.

    10. Goldfinger (1964)

    Classic Bond film with a very strong cast and plot. Shirley Bassey's golden theme, the scene with Shirley Eaton coated in gold and the Aston Martin DB5 are enduring icons of the Connery era, but this film is one of Connery's slowest (second only to Dr No) and it's both dated and formulaic, though I suppose the latter isn't a particularly valid complaint seeing as Goldfinger practically established the 007 formula. There are plenty of other brilliant scenes that can be named (the golf scene, the laser scene, etc.) but there are two things that probably should've been left on the cutting room floor. The first is Tilly Masterson, who contributes nothing to the plot. The second is Bond practically raping a disinterested Pussy Galore who suddenly turns over to the good side. That scene makes no sense at all. Goldfinger conferring with all the crime bosses is also silly given that he just kills them all right after the meeting, which again contributes nothing to the plot, but we need a way for our favourite spy to learn the villain's master plan, and at least 007's spying this time and not getting the plan told to him straight-up by the villain. Still, it's not as silly as each of the crime lords doing a twirl as they collapse dead from poison gas, lol.

    Good, but clearly flawed

    11. Dr No (1962)

    While it can't be understated as to what this film has given us, there's no denying that it was a much rawer production. This was the first attempt at a 007 adventure so naturally there are flaws. It's incredibly dated and slow, and the scenes between Bond's meeting with M and his meeting Honey Ryder feel painfully like filler scenes, even when they introduce key characters. The plot could use some work, as could the rather 50's sounding score. Still, the atmosphere is presented wonderfully and Dr No is one the best villains in the mythos — not just because Joseph Wiseman plays him perfectly but because he has the rare advantage of being built up in the shadows throughout the film. He's actually terrifying, and a great counterpart to Connery's immaculately played Bond. Can't complain about Ursula Andress as Honey Ryder, either.

    12. A View to a Kill (1985)

    I'm aware that this film has been near-universally panned by critics and fans alike, but as I said before, I have a soft spot for Moore's 80's flicks. Not sure how much people notice it, but Moore's 80's films get darker each time and this one is pretty dark by his standards. Despite that, this is the probably the only Bond film that manages to be fully campy and succeeds at it, an achievement in its own right. Moore's advanced age and contrast with the young girls he beds is a bit disturbing, especially because the previous two films readily acknowledged his age but this one tries to pretend that he's as young as when he started out. Other than that, though, his age isn't too much of a problem; his acting still manages to remain up to par.

    While Tanya Roberts' Stacey Sutton is admittedly a rather pitiful addition to the pantheon of Bond girls, she's still not the worst of the Moore era. And she's definitely made up for by the incredible theme song and score, and the amazing villains. The plot is mostly a rehash of Goldfinger's so it loses points for lack of originality, but it still manages to set up the stakes well and the early setbacks really makes Bond look out of his depth here. There's a sense of desperation all the way through to the brilliant climax on the Golden Gate Bridge. It's all rather just fun and moves along at breakneck pace, so you're never given enough time to fully appreciate the ridiculousness of it all, but you still manage to follow the plot and you're never bored (or at least I wasn't). A winning combination.

    13. Licence to Kill (1989)

    LTK is the better of Dalton's two entries and for the most part, there's one reason for that: Sanchez. He's an amazingly good villain who blows the ones of the last two decades out of the water. Even Dalton's acting is almost put to shame, and Dalton does manage the darker side of Bond very well. Everything else has mixed results: the revenge plot and "going rogue" theme was fresh (at least for its time; it's not anymore) and the series really does take a darker turn here. A welcome attempt at channeling the darker side of Bond is made by Dalton. However, the film spends too much time indulging in excessive bloodletting in colourless settings (Isthmus City doesn't get nearly enough exposition to justify Bond going to a fictional city) and not enough time on properly portraying Bond's damaged psychological state. That's not how you make a film dark. Dalton's attempt at playing a romance hero really goes too far when we get a love triangle between Pam Bouvier and Lupe Lamora that detracts from the film's plot. The Wayne Newton side story contributed absolutely nothing to the plot, either.

    14. Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)

    A fairly solid entry here. Michelle Yeoh is kickass but for the first half of the movie she's sidelined in favour of half-developed sideplots with Teri Hatcher and probably the most comically incompetent assassin ever in Dr. Kaufman. Brosnan gives a good performance and I greatly enjoyed Jonathan Prycer's take on Elliot Carver, but both are held back by a weaker script. The plot is original and we get the best action of the Brosnan era. Unfortunately, everything else is mediocre at best. The finale also feels a bit lazy (especially with the way it disposes of Carver) and ripped out of a generic action movie.

    15. The Living Daylights (1987)

    Timothy Dalton's widely lauded for turning the series away from the camp of the Moore era to a more gritty and grounded setting. While I appreciate his effort to do so, TLD really just doesn't feel all that fresh to me. There's repeated retreads of Moore-esque comedy, and the film really doesn't go beyond anything Moore did in FYEO or OP. Timothy Dalton's a good Bond but he's strained with carrying Kara Milovy, one of the weaker Bond girls, and it's only made worse by his attempts at playing a romantic hero. This is the last Cold War thriller and it's nice to have a movie where the world or most of the world isn't at stake again, but the villains' plot is poorly defined and after a while we lose sight of the actual arms-drugs trade between Koskov and Whitaker. Speaking of whom, they're also very weak villains, which drags the movie down. Whitaker's as dull as dishwater and Koskov is a pale shadow of Kristatos in FYEO, partly because his treachery is revealed too early, partly because he's way too ingratiating when he tried to play ally to actually believe he was one, and partly because he becomes almost as colourless as Whitaker after his betrayal.

    16. Live and Let Die (1973)

    Probably the weirdest Bond film. There's two big things to give it credit for: the cracking theme by Paul McCartney and Wings (the score by George Martin is pretty good too), and the voodoo subplot, which is one of the few that actually manages to tie into the main plot. Apart from those two, the plot and the sheer bizarre factor are probably the strongest elements of the film itself, which is spiced with ooga-booga voodoo (the sub-plot works, but there's too much of it) and features Rosie Carver, one of the most laughably incompetent Bond girls to ever grace the screen. She's supposed to be a double agent for Kananga whose cover is a CIA agent, but her first few minutes have her screaming twice (first at a dead snake and then at a hat) and her bedding Bond with her lips trembling. The best thing about her is that she sets up one of Bond's best one-liners "I certainly wouldn't have killed you before".

    Kananga's interesting. He's acted well and proved that Bond could persist beyond the era of tired Blofeld retreads, but the Mr Big/Kananga reveal doesn't fool anyone and he has a strange case of bipolar personality. Just compare at his personality in the first half of the film and in the finale in the underground lair. His demise is the most laughable of any Bond villain's, with the most obvious dummy ever. The PTS is also one of the worst, as it's not only an incoherent mix of people being killed, but outright fails to feature Bond in any capacity. Then there's Sheriff J.W. Pepper, who contributes nothing but bad humour. As compensation, we get some genuinely good humour in some of Moore's deliveries and quite a few good stunts, with the crocodile escape remaining one of the best moments in Bond history.

    Enjoyable, but with glaring deficiencies

    17. You Only Live Twice (1967)

    The ranking of this one surprised me most. I used to have it fairly high up, but when I'm asked to reconsider the details, there's shockingly little to justify it being up there. It's littered with cultural insensitivity and is easily the most racist (and probably the most sexist) entry in the Bond canon. We get the first true world-domination plot, a good theme song and score, and Ken Adam's incredible sets, but YOLT's also the most parodied of all the Bond films. Although Donald Pleasance's ultra-camp Blofeld works (as long as there's no shot of him standing next to Bond, after which he loses all semblance of menace), Connery goes straight from being the man in Thunderball to disinterested and near-wooden here. And while plenty of Bond films are guilty of the whole "villain leaks plot to 007 and fails to kill him when he has the chance", YOLT is easily the most guilty of that. Blofeld literally says his entire plan to Bond within a minute of meeting him, then tells Hans about the rocket-destroying switch right in front of Bond. Then there's the awfully cringeworthy "This is the price of failure, Mr Bond" scene where he threatens to shoot Bond, then takes forever to slowly move the gun away towards Osato and shoot him in a move that surprised nobody and taught Bond nothing. The worst is yet to come, though: instead of just shooting Bond afterwards, he beckons Bond to follow him outside into the main room where two armies are doing battle, just so he can then take his time bidding Bond goodbye while Tanaka disarms him with a ninja star. Ninjas as are cool and all, but Blofeld being reduced from the most terrifying to the most incompetent villain in Bond history is very disappointing.

    18. Spectre (2015)

    A very average entry. The first half is filled with suspense and good action, but second half is just packed with Bond cliches and is devoid of any suspense whatsoever. Giving Blofeld a personal connection to Bond was completely unnecessary, but giving him daddy issues is downright stupid. The film resorts to leaning on the 007 formula after having avoided it throughout the Craig era, which in of itself isn't bad, but it's not executed particularly satisfactorily. I've also got complaints about the shameless and pointless retreading of the Aston Martin DB5, which is just being overplayed now (it's featured in more of Craig's movies than it has in Connery 's). There's also something to be said about the atmosphere of the film. It's somewhat dark, but also bland and dull. There's nobody around in the Rome car chase and after the SPECTRE meeting almost everything is painfully predictable. The few injections of classic Bond humour were welcome, though.

    19. The World Is Not Enough (1999)

    Wasted potential is the first thing that comes to mind. Sophie Marceaux is one of the best Bond girls and one of the best villains, yet she's forced to play second fiddle to Christmas Jones and Renard, both of whom aren't fit to lick her boots. The plot is incredibly overcomplicated and there's too many twists and turns, with the action feeling increasingly typical and Americanized. M's meatier role is a double-edged sword — we get more of Judi Dench, which is always a plus, but it also greatly strains credibility that the head of MI6 would leave herself in such a compromised and vulnerable position. I will say that the movie's not boring, however, and manages to procure not only some good humour but also just some good scenes in general even without Elektra. I feel this could have been one of the best Bonds, but instead it's one of the worst with a few more things going for it than the next one in line.

    20. Moonraker (1979)

    I'm not actually that fussed over the gondola or Bond heading into space, but Jaws being reduced to comic relief is still hard to stomach. Every time I see him falling in love I'm tempted to rank this film at the bottom. The film almost deserves points for its audacity, but instead of just running away with its campiness it features the occasional effort to make itself taken seriously. Thankfully it drops that by the end but by then Jaws has already fallen in love. Ugh.

    The main reason why this film sits above the next few is because it does at least have a few things going for it. One is a strong cast: Roger Moore is completely in his element here and Michael Lonsdale is one of the better villains. I actually don't mind Holly Goodhead, either. On top of that, the film has a few moments of genuinely good humour, a decent theme song, one of Ken Adam's grandest set designs, and an equally grand contribution from John Barry.

    21. Quantum of Solace (2008)

    This one's disappointing in part because of the fact that it's sandwiched between the two best Bond films, for me, and how utterly mediocre it is in comparison. The main plot is insipid and uninteresting, and detracts from the far more interesting sub-plot with Bond chasing after justice for Vesper. The film features one of the worst Bond themes, one of the worst villains, and the worst editing ever. Good action scenes are marred by insane cutting rates that turn them into incomprehensible montages. Craig still turns in a good performance, though, and the final scene is one of the best in the franchise. A strong redeeming note, but it can't carry all of QoS' baggage, not with the worst gunbarrel in history immediately following it. :)

    22. The Man With The Golden Gun (1974)

    This is another film full of wasted potential. This could have been Roger Moore's most personal mission, featuring Bond vs Scaramanga as an absolute thriller. Instead, it's hindered by an energy-crisis subplot, Bond being forced into a silly karate fight (to be followed by an even sillier scene with Hip and his nieces), and way too much focus on third nipples. Britt Ekland is terrible, probably the worst Bond girl ever. Andrea Anders being killed off in favour of Goodnight was probably the nail in the coffin, but there's still Moore being forced to play Bond uncharacteristically like Sean Connery, J.W. Pepper returning for reasons known only to the producers, and a slide whistle ruining one of the best stunts in Bond history. Christopher Lee manages to shine, and any scene with Scaramanga in it is good. I especially like the final duel between him and Bond, but I find it difficult to sit through the rest of the film. Lulu's theme song is dreadful (one of the worst) and this might be John Barry's most pedestrian score.

    23. Die Another Day (2002)

    The only reason this isn't dead-last is because DAF had to build off prior films and failed miserably, letting them down in the process. DAD is its own thing, but it features the worst of the Brosnan era with shameless overindulgence in bad CGI at the cost of any decent characterization or writing. Jinx is a terrible Bond girl and the pun marathon in the movie is pretty cringeworthy even by Bond standards. The villain and theme song are probably the worst in Bond history, and again the script and plot are terrible. Virtually no redeeming features here except for being entertaining if you're in the mood for it; again it's saved from being the bottom of the barrel only because DAF is more disappointing due to its contextual place in the series, and because Brosnan actually looks interested here.

    24. Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

    The epitome of wasted potential. Instead of having a proper revenge story follow-up from OHMSS, we're given an ultra-camp film that features both Connery and Blofeld at their worst (I like Charles Gray as a villain but for me there's no denying his Blofeld brought the character to a new low, what with Bond casually killing his doubles over and over and him being dressed in drag at one point), a completely useless Bond girl, a boring, generic plot, terrible special effects even for its time, and a sour taste in the mouth after viewing. Still, there's a couple of good action scenes, a couple of actually really funny moments, and a pretty good theme song by the great Shirley Bassey.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    Very detailed ranking @ForYourEyesOnly. It was great to read your rationale for placements. I'm actually quite partial to your overall ranking decisions too.
  • ForYourEyesOnlyForYourEyesOnly In the untained cradle of the heavens
    Posts: 1,984
    @bondjames - Thanks. I seem to have a thing for lists and rankings, lol. But yeah, I'm quite surprised by how different my list is to my other one just two weeks ago in the other thread. I just having to justify your position forces a few changes.

    I can find things to enjoy about all of them, as I acknowledge in my name for the bottom tier, but some are just worse than others.

    And I've noticed a bit of a correlation between our rankings, too. In the other thread I was told that my correlation figure was closest to yours. I know you dislike TWINE and you seem to dislike SP? I thought you liked TMWTGG, though.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    @ForYourEyesOnly, yes I love TMWTGG sentimentally. It is one of my earliest memories of Bond (I think they showed it on ITV in the UK one bank holiday and I was instantly hooked on all the zany characters and amazing locations. Moore was just so cool as well). I can't remember where I place it in my rankings but it's not too high. Although I'll always have a soft spot for the film (and to this day always have a blast when watching it) I can't rationally place it in the upper ranks given the plot is a bit sparse and distracted by the energy element & silliness as you note. I personally think it's Moore's best performance though (I realize I'm in a minority on this view). I think his essential screen 'niceness' allows him to play a little more of an archetypal brutal Bondian 'a^h@!e' in this film without it coming across so rough & offensive on screen.
  • peterpeter Toronto
    Posts: 8,485
    Well done @ForYourEyesOnly; thanks for sharing. This made excellent reading as I watch the Federer surgery now taking place on live TV.

    I have to agree with @bondjames: I too think RM is best in TMWTGG (and OP).
  • ForYourEyesOnlyForYourEyesOnly In the untained cradle of the heavens
    Posts: 1,984
    @bondjames - That's fair. Firsts are difficult to rank low, and I can see the appeal of Moore playing it rough even though I just find it inconsistent myself.

    Looking at the list above, I'm very unsympathetic to Hamilton and Gilbert and very sympathetic towards Campbell, Young and Glen, lol.

    I recall you liking Gilbert, since I think you said you were one of the few who liked YOLT and I believe your all-time favourite is still TSWLM?
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited July 2017 Posts: 23,883
    @ForyYourEyesOnly, I think Young is my favourite based on my overall rankings (all 3 in the top 10), followed by Campbell (both in the top 10). So we're similar in that respect. I'm pretty split on the rest.

    Actually, I believe TSWLM (which I currently have at 3, behind FRWL & TB) is the only Gilbert film I have in the top 15 or so. Like TMWTGG, I really enjoy MR, but can't honestly rank it highly since it's essentially an entertaining parody of TSWLM. I like YOLT up until the ninja training but from then onwards I find it terribly dull, and so I rank the film quite low overall as well.
  • ForYourEyesOnlyForYourEyesOnly In the untained cradle of the heavens
    Posts: 1,984
    @peter - Haha, thanks. Glad to see Federer win again. My all-time favourite tennis player.
  • ForYourEyesOnlyForYourEyesOnly In the untained cradle of the heavens
    Posts: 1,984
    @bondjames — Ah, okay. Glad to see love for FRWL and TB. Brilliant movies, they are. What do you think of OHMSS and Dalton?
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    @ForyourEyesOnly, I've grown to like OHMSS a lot (I didn't like it at all when younger). In fact, like DAF (ironic given the change in tone between them and since the successor is seen as a travesty of a follow up), it's the Bond film that moves up my rankings every time I view it. I think I have it at 5.

    I'm not a big Dalton fan. I think he is the most forgettable Bond actor personally. While he had a real intensity, I just don't think he had screen presence or style. However, I have LTK at 10, because I think the Dalton/Davi dynamic is one of the best in the series and because LTK is such a unique entry. I think his 2nd film much better suits his style of Bond compared to his first. Again, I'm in the minority because most I know rank TLD higher. Ultimately, I think a Bond film must be built around the actor's style (another criticism I have of SP).

    PS: I'm also ecstatic that Federer won. So good to see an 'old school' finesse driven player still come up on top.
  • peterpeter Toronto
    Posts: 8,485
    Yes, Feds is a Master and makes it look like a great dance piece when he surgically picks apart his opponents.
  • ForYourEyesOnlyForYourEyesOnly In the untained cradle of the heavens
    edited July 2017 Posts: 1,984
    bondjames wrote: »
    @ForyourEyesOnly, I've grown to like OHMSS a lot (I didn't like it at all when younger). In fact, like DAF (ironic given the change in tone between them and since the successor is seen as a travesty of a follow up), it's the Bond film that moves up my rankings every time I view it. I think I have it at 5.

    I'm not a big Dalton fan. I think he is the most forgettable Bond actor personally. While he had a real intensity, I just don't think he had screen presence or style. However, I have LTK at 10, because I think the Dalton/Davi dynamic is one of the best in the series and because LTK is such a unique entry. I think his 2nd film much better suits his style of Bond compared to his first. Again, I'm in the minority because most I know rank TLD higher. Ultimately, I think a Bond film must be built around the actor's style (another criticism I have of SP).

    PS: I'm also ecstatic that Federer won. So good to see an 'old school' finesse driven player still come up on top.

    That makes sense. TLD spent too much time with Moore-esque comedy that Dalton wasn't suited for, and the villains were utterly forgettable. LTK was significantly darker and Sanchez is one of the best villains, on top of being perfect with Dalton. That's the big difference for me. In every other area (except action), I think TLD is better, which is why it still manages to rank quite close to LTK. But the villain thing is a big gripe for me.

    I agree with your thoughts on Dalton. I appreciate him giving us the turn of the page after Moore's chapter, but he really only lasted a page or two himself. He was sorely reliant on the plot and other characters around him, while the likes of Moore and Brosnan managed to come off as good Bonds even in spite of weak writing and deficiencies in the cast. On the other hand, I appreciate that Dalton was very faithful to the books (though Bond on the screen is a completely different beast) and that he took the role with utmost seriousness. Still, as you said, his presence is rather weak. I would still rank him above Lazenby somewhat just because his general acting is better, but he's second to last for me. He might have embodied the Bond of the books well but he never embodied the Bond of the screen well, which is a shame.
  • GBFGBF
    Posts: 3,195
    @ForYourEyesOnly

    Thanks for your nice ranking. I guess we have many similarities, even though my favourite Bond film is TLD...
  • ForYourEyesOnlyForYourEyesOnly In the untained cradle of the heavens
    Posts: 1,984
    @GBF - Thanks. I would still class TLD as above-average. :)
  • edited August 2017 Posts: 12,260
    Time for me to update my ranking on this thread. A lot changed has since my last time watching all the films. I'll post Part 1 now and Part 2 later:

    24. Moonraker
    Ultimately I decided MR is still my least favorite EON Bond film, but my #23 choice is pretty much on the same level. The PTS is my favorite part of MR, which is pretty decent, and the title song is decent too, but the film just becomes less and less enjoyable as it goes along IMO. Roger Moore gives his most autopilot performance, which still means he's good, but less good than in his other Bond films. None of the Bond elements of this film stand out as particularly good to me, and the whole idea of Bond being in outer space does not work for me at all. I don't hate any of the Bond films, but someone has to lose. I can still have some fun with MR at times, but I have to put it last.
    23. Die Another Day
    I like DAD about as much as MR, but decided to give it a slight edge; Brosnan's performance is a little more interesting here than Moore's in MR, so I let that be the difference maker. The first 40ish minutes of the film aren't too bad, but then like MR, it just keeps getting worse for me. Gustav Graves would probably be my choice for least favorite Bond villain. Both films have a train-wreck second half, but my preference for the first parts in DAD help it stay a little ahead for now. Good PTS, good job by Brosnan, some cool scenes here and there, but not much else unfortunately.
    22. Diamonds Are Forever
    A long time ago I ranked DAF considerably higher, but I've realized for a while now it has to be one of my least favorites. Connery's alright in it, and Mr. Wint & Mr. Kidd rank as some of the greatest henchmen in the series, but the film collectively is one of the weakest ones IMO. Charles Grey was a disappointing Blofeld, and the Bond girls here are meh. There are entertaining scenes here and there, but it's ultimately a disappointing return for Connery as Bond - far too silly especially for his Bond.
    21. The Man with the Golden Gun
    For certain, Christopher Lee's Scaramanga is one of the greatest villains of the Bond series; I wish the majority of the film had been played more seriously, as I think it would have benefited the plot more here. The title song is one of my least favorites, and Goodnight isn't such a great Bond girl. Many of the film's other elements don't stand out to me as particularly good or bad. A number of scenes can be sort of uninteresting unfortunately. On the whole, it's a silly, but still fun Bond adventure.
    20. The World Is Not Enough
    I have a hard time choosing between TMWTGG and TWINE, but for now at least, I will let TWINE stay one ahead. Elektra is a very good villain, Brosnan is fine as Bond, the action scenes are mostly good (except the snow one...), the story's good, and Desmond Llewelyn's Q gets a great final scene. However, I don't like Renard much, Denise Richards is one of the worst Bond girls easily, and many scenes do drag a bit. I used to like TWINE a lot more, but unfortunately, it now must stay on the lower side of my ranking.
    19. A View to a Kill
    AVTAK was once in last place on my list, but it has managed to climb up a few spots - carried heavily by the tremendous villain, Christopher Walken's Zorin. The film has many cool scenes, a great title song, and a solid Roger Moore performance, even though he is obviously too old at this point! Stacey Sutton is still my least favorite Bond girl, and the PTS also would rank near or at the bottom of the series for me. These things hold it back from ranking higher, but overall it's still a pretty enjoyable film that has enjoyed a nice boost in my estimation.
    18. Tomorrow Never Dies
    TND used to rank as my least favorite Brosnan Bond film, and it has now become my second favorite of his films. Unfortunately it still ranks on the lower side of my list, but that by no means makes it bad. The PTS is solid, Brosnan does a great job, the girls are good, and the action scenes are great across the board. I'm not a big fan of the villains (BESIDES DR. KAUFMAN, WHO IS TERRIFIC) though, and I think it is one of the more generic-feeling, by-the-numbers Bond films in the series. Regardless, a good time most of the way through - up until a meh finale.
    17. Octopussy
    OP is maybe the best example of what the Roger Moore Bond era was about - more comedy, more colors, and just a general lightheartedness. OP would rank super high if you ranked these films solely by their fun factor. It's very camp and silly, but it really works for this one; sometimes it just works and sometimes it doesn't IMO, and here most of it is just good fun. Not the biggest fan of the Bond villains and girls here, but there are too many good scenes here to neglect.
    16. Quantum of Solace
    Huge tonal shift going from OP to this! QoS's editing is questionable, and unfortunately many of its ideas and scenes can come off as dull in comparison to its predecessor CR. However, this film is still over-hated, and has a fair amount to like about it. Craig is great, the PTS is pretty cool, Quantum itself is underrated IMO, and the girls are good. Really not a bad movie, but what hurts most is it really needs CR to be such an enjoyable experience, rather than being good as a standalone.
    15. Spectre
    SP may be the most mixed bag of a Bond film to date for me. What I liked: the PTS (among my favorites), Craig (some don't like him in this one, but I like all his performances), Mr. White, SPECTRE's return, the actors, and some of the action (mostly the PTS, the snow chase, and the train fight - good stuff). What I didn't like: reliance on past Craig films for plot purposes, Blofeld having a childhood connection with Bond, Bond and Madeleine's relationship (not bad per say, but far from Bond + Vesper and Bond + Tracy), and a generally meh third act. I think making it more lighthearted and Moore-esque both helped and hurt the film as well at different times. I definitely like this film overall but it has fallen in my estimation since first seeing it.
    14. You Only Live Twice
    YOLT remains my least favorite of the golden age Bond era (DN through OHMSS), but by no means does that make it bad. It's always fun to see Connery Bond battling SPECTRE; the first 30 and final 30 or so minutes of this film are the strongest I think. Terrific climax especially. There's a lot of good scenes in the first and final acts of this film. However, I think some of middle can drag a bit, and I find myself sometimes itching to just reach the ending. Besides Blofeld, I didn't think the villains were particularly great - same goes for the Bond girls. A lot of it average. But all in all, there is a lot to like and it's still a good Bond classic.
    13. The Living Daylights
    I have always ranked Timothy Dalton as my least favorite Bond, but I still do like him, as well as both of his films. TLD is generally a solid Bond film all around - Dalton does fine, the PTS is top-notch, the action scenes are really good, the story is good, etc. One thing I didn't care for as much are the villains - Georgi and Whitaker - who I think are on the weaker side of villains in the series. Some of the third act is also on the weaker side. Barring that, lots of good stuff to be had.

    I will post my 12-1 later!
  • Posts: 12,260
    The rest of my current ranking:

    12. Thunderball
    Used to be my least favorite Connery Bond film - now comfortably ahead of YOLT and DAF. This is the first Bond film I ever watched actually! Connery gives a great performance in this one, and the Bond girls are some of my favorites in the series. The villains, barring Fiona, are on the average side, and the underwater climax is on the meh side I think. Most of it is a really good Bond film though, and comes fairly close to my Top 10.
    11. Live and Let Die
    LALD is a really good debut film for Roger Moore as Bond. The black magic themes and comedy really work here; the film has a clear, strong identity and works very well most of the time. Kananga is a good villain, and Solitaire is a good Bond girl. The title song is great, too. Just a few parts in the middle drag a bit for me, but otherwise it's totally solid and a very good Bond film. Falls just short of my Top 10 for now!
    10. For Your Eyes Only
    I had a really good time watching FYEO most recently, and for now I am going to give it my #10 spot; between TB, LALD, and this one it's very close. Roger Moore getting a more serious entry is great, and he does an excellent job acting in it throughout. The villains are decent, and Melina is a very good Bond girl. A lot of people hate the PTS and think it's too silly, but I personally really enjoy it. The only things that hold this one back are Bibi and the soundtrack; if not for those, it might have had a chance to be even higher. As it stands, a really good entry for Roger Moore.
    9. Licence to Kill
    LTK has always been my preference between Dalton's two Bond films, even though I like TLD too. LTK is a good revenge film, and Sanchez is one of the best Bond villains of the whole series. Lots of good action in this one to go with a good story. For me, this and FYEO mark the high points of 80s Bond films.
    8. From Russia with Love
    One of the most beloved of all Bond films - THE most beloved on our site here. I understand why; it's a pretty great Bond adventure from start to finish. Connery is great, the villains are great, the story's good, the action is sparing but superb, and the Bond girls are decent (I still think Tatiana is an overrated Bond girl, but not bad). The train fight is maybe the best fight scene in the whole series. Just a classic all-around; very good stuff.
    7. Dr. No
    Since the beginning, I have preferred the lower-budget DN to FRWL. This last marathon they are as close as ever to one another, but I still am going to give DN the nod for me personally. I love the story and villain of this one a lot, and Connery really is as good as ever in his first outing here. Honey is of course one of the greatest Bond girls. The side characters are very good as well - Dent, Quarrel, Felix, etc. I really love DN; it is the first EON Bond and still one of the very best.
    6. The Spy Who Loved Me
    Many would agree TSWLM is Roger Moore's finest Bond film, and I really can't imagine my opinion changing on that one. It's classic Bond from start to finish - from the incredible PTS to an epic climax! Jaws is one of the very best henchmen. The main baddie and Bond girl are both pretty good I think too! This one is just superbly entertaining all the way through - a long-time favorite of mine.
    5. Skyfall
    Though I like QoS and SP, they need the other Craig Bond films around them to operate well; on the other hand, CR and SF can work as standalone classics or within Craig's continuity. I really enjoy SF's story, and I like that Judi Dench's M got a lot of meat here for her sendoff. Craig is totally comfortable at this point as Bond, and getting Q and Moneypenny back was cool! The title song and main villain are terrific! It was very exciting when this one came to the theater; though not quite as high as when I first saw it, it still gets a deserved high ranking from me.
    4. GoldenEye
    Pierce Brosnan's first Bond film is far and away his best I think, and one of the finest outputs of modern Bond (90s and above). Brosnan himself does a good job, and he's surrounded by great villains and Bond girls here. The PTS is one of the series' best, and there are plenty of great action scenes throughout. Just a very fun, energetic Bond film here - one of my favorites.
    3. Goldfinger
    GF has always been, and still remains my favorite of Connery's Bond films - which is a great honor! Auric Goldfinger and Oddjob are a terrific pair of baddies, and the Bond girls are really good here too. Beyond that, Connery is terrific as Bond, the story is classic Bond, and there is an amount of action that feels just right. Also the PTS and title song are awesome. A true Bond classic indeed.
    2. On Her Majesty's Secret Service
    It's a shame many people didn't appreciate OHMSS when it first came out; it's a real treat from start to finish. Lazenby, while not quite my favorite Bond, gives a very convincing performance and I still think he is underrated as Bond. Tracy is my favorite Bond girl, and Telly Savalas's Blofeld is my favorite Bond villain. The story is terrific, and I absolutely love how they used the Alps for much of the film. So much to love here; a perfect conclusion to the original golden age of Bond films.
    1. Casino Royale
    CR - still my #1. I don't see that changing anytime soon either. Basically I love everything in this film - the PTS, Craig's Bond performance, the girl, the villain, the locations, the action, the story - just everything. It may be on the longer side for a Bond film, but that hasn't stopped me from rewatching it a ton. Absolutely brilliant debut for Craig, and exactly what the series needed after the disappointment of DAD - simply awesome.
  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 on fb and ajb
    edited August 2017 Posts: 9,020
    .
  • RemingtonRemington I'll do anything for a woman with a knife.
    Posts: 1,533
    PART ONE

    1. GoldenEye (1995) - I highly doubt this film will ever be dethroned from the top spot. This is the Bond that introduced me to the series and made me fall in love with it. I love Brosnan, the supporting characters, the action, the score, the story, the cinematography, the atmosphere, and the theme song. Even if you don't care for this movie, you have to admit it saved the franchise. The only change I'd make is to include a couple of the deleted scenes.
    A

    2. Licence to Kill (1989) - This is what happens when you combine Bond and 80s action/Miami Vice. I love both of those so this is almost perfection. Dalton and Davi are both on absolute fire here. It had my favorite finale of the series and I love Q's expanded role. The lower budget and "TV" look is almost part of its charm. There's a couple nitpicks I have here and there but I absolutely love this movie.
    A

    3. The Living Daylights (1987) - The only reason this film is below LTK is because the latter has a better villain and girl. The cinematography is good, the score is fantastic, and the settings are great. Controversially, I prefer Dalton in this film. John Terry is a weak link but it's a damn near perfect Cold War Bond film in my eyes.
    A

    4. Casino Royale (2006) - This film just blows me away every time I watch it. Everything works. This is the Craig that I love. The acting, characters, and writing is great all around. The locations are beautiful, the cinematography is lush, the action is awesome, and Arnold's score is great. Even people I know who don't care for Bond films actually enjoy this movie.
    A

    5. Quantum of Solace (2008) - I love this movie to death. Sure the editing is overly choppy at times. I don't care. Everything else is great and it works well as a second half to CR despite being stylistically different. This film has some of my favorite cinematography, music, and action of the series. Also, I think this is Craig's best performance. If this one was about ten minutes longer so a couple subplots could have been fleshed out, I would like this as much as CR. If only the Vesper/Quantum story ended here.
    A

    Objectively, the next few films rank higher but this list is purely subjective.

    6. Thunderball (1965) - The perfect 60s Bond film. This one has my favorite Connery performance, location, action, score, and women. I think the villains are great as well. The underwater climax lasts a little too long and the final fight aboard the Disco Volante is pretty rough but those are minor gripes. When I think of 60s Bond, I think of this movie.
    A

    7. Goldfinger (1964) - This one is pretty much tied with TB for me. Just about everything in this film is iconic. Goldfinger is one of the best villains, the theme song and score are great, Oddjob is awesome, the action is good, Connery is great, it's classy and sexy, and I love Pussy...Galore.
    A

    8. Dr. No (1962) - The reason I rank this film so highly is due to its simplicity. Many of these films have really convoluted storylines. Not this one. To top it off, we have a great setting in Jamaica, the plot is engaging, it feels pulpy in a good way, and Dr. No is my favorite Connery villain. Honey Rider is a decent character but she's far from my favorite Bond girl. Ursula Andress is indeed gorgeous though.
    A

    9. From Russia with Love (1963) - I think, along with CR and OHMSS, that this is the best film of the series. It works brilliantly as a standalone Cold War espionage thriller. Connery is on top form, the villains are phenomenal, I love Tanya, and the settings are all great. I just don't find myself watching this one as much as the others.
    A

    10. On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) - I absolutely hated this film when I was 11. Fast forward ten years and I realize that this film is almost a masterpiece. Lazenby does quite well for a first time actor, the cinematography is beautiful, the action is amazing, and Telly Savalas is my favorite Blofeld. Diana Rigg is of course great and the ending breaks my heart every time.
    A

    11. For Your Eyes Only (1981) - I used to consider this to be the worst film along with OHMSS. Damn have I matured. This movie is great. As much as I enjoy over the top Bond films, this film is a breath of fresh air. Moore gives one of his best performances. I totally buy him as a veteran agent in this one. I love the characters of Melina and Colombo as well. If the film has a weakness, it's the villains and the underwater sequence which seems to go on forever.
    A

    12. Live and Let Die (1973) - I always have a blast with this movie. God I miss Roger Moore. He knocks it out of the park with his first film. This also has one of my favorite scores and theme songs of the series. Kananga is a pretty good villain and I've always liked Solitaire. The finale is a little weak though.
    A

    To be continued
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    Nice read.
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