No Time to Die production thread

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  • Posts: 3,164
    antovolk wrote: »
    octofinger wrote: »
    I think the VOD market would be very small, and it's hard to imagine a pricing structure that would make it worthwhile.

    I'm thinking of the millions of people in, say, southeast Asia who are Bond fans and would gladly stump up a few bucks to see it in cinema, but who don't have a credit card, or access to home streaming.

    $20 to rent for 48 hours is what Universal's been pioneering. And local platforms and solutions - along with global players like iTunes - exist in those territories too. All you need is a laptop or smartphone at least...

    You're being ignorant towards piracy. You will loose a huge chunk of money once that occurs.

    I think the pandemic has to get much worse before we get into a situation where VOD becomes realistic. If it's still a problem in August/September, they'll push NTTD to summer 2021.

    I'm fed up of this 'I want it now!' mentality. People need to be patient and wait for theatres to re-open and this disaster to subside. There are far more pressing issues than whether we get our precious Bond film or not.

    Not necessarily - piracy has always been an issue with home releases and yet Trolls makes double of what it was predicted to theatrically... And how much of the people pirating would have gone to see it in cinemas if they were open? Not all of piracy is necessarily lost sales.

    I still think though if the crisis goes on for longer and cinemas don't reopen by November, the entire business model of theatrical will be changed irrevocably. Not only loads of cinemas - even major chains - may not survive closures that long, audiences will be even more used to consuming content at home. And distributors will have to adapt.
  • edited April 2020 Posts: 490
    antovolk wrote: »
    antovolk wrote: »
    octofinger wrote: »
    I think the VOD market would be very small, and it's hard to imagine a pricing structure that would make it worthwhile.

    I'm thinking of the millions of people in, say, southeast Asia who are Bond fans and would gladly stump up a few bucks to see it in cinema, but who don't have a credit card, or access to home streaming.

    $20 to rent for 48 hours is what Universal's been pioneering. And local platforms and solutions - along with global players like iTunes - exist in those territories too. All you need is a laptop or smartphone at least...

    You're being ignorant towards piracy. You will loose a huge chunk of money once that occurs.

    I think the pandemic has to get much worse before we get into a situation where VOD becomes realistic. If it's still a problem in August/September, they'll push NTTD to summer 2021.

    I'm fed up of this 'I want it now!' mentality. People need to be patient and wait for theatres to re-open and this disaster to subside. There are far more pressing issues than whether we get our precious Bond film or not.

    Not necessarily - piracy has always been an issue with home releases and yet Trolls makes double of what it was predicted to theatrically... And how much of the people pirating would have gone to see it in cinemas if they were open? Not all of piracy is necessarily lost sales.

    I still think though if the crisis goes on for longer and cinemas don't reopen by November, the entire business model of theatrical will be changed irrevocably. Not only loads of cinemas - even major chains - may not survive closures that long, audiences will be even more used to consuming content at home. And distributors will have to adapt.

    So do you believe if theaters are still closed in November or even August (when they'd need to start marketing again) they'd seriously consider VOD rather than another delay?
  • matt_umatt_u better known as Mr. Roark
    Posts: 4,343
    I feel BB won’t allow a VOD release.
  • matt_u wrote: »
    I feel BB won’t allow a VOD release.

    She should have premiered The Rhythm Section on VOD, it would have made more money. ;)
  • matt_u wrote: »
    I feel BB won’t allow a VOD release.

    Don't disagree with you, but she's not the only one with a stake in NTTD.
  • matt_umatt_u better known as Mr. Roark
    Posts: 4,343
    matt_u wrote: »
    I feel BB won’t allow a VOD release.

    Don't disagree with you, but she's not the only one with a stake in NTTD.

    Yes sure... anyway she will try to protect a theatrical release with all her strength.
  • DeerAtTheGatesDeerAtTheGates Belgium
    edited April 2020 Posts: 524
    The CEO of Aston Martin on Bond in a new interview:

    Aston Martin and Bond

    The 1964 James Bond film Goldfinger (pictured above) saw the introduction of a new car for 007, the Aston Martin DB5 – signalling the start of a relationship that now spans 13 films and more than 50 years of cinema history.

    In the upcoming instalment, No Time To Die, no fewer than four Aston Martin’s are featured.

    “First comes the DB5, then V8 Sedan, DBS Superleggera and finally the Valhalla. It’s a progression through time and it’s a great reflection of the relationship.

    “We produce cars that are functional, elegant and powerful – they’re cars that allows James Bond to do his job effectively.”

    Marek has an excellent working relationship with Barbara Broccoli, Michael Wilson and Daniel Craig.

    “They typically come to my studio before they’re about to finalise the script and we take them through the cars we have in our line-up. It’s very much a mutual partnership – not a pay-to-play relationship,” he explains.

    “In fact, when Sam Mendes introduced the cast of Spectre, he introduced the Aston Martin DB10 as one of the first cast members.”
  • Posts: 11,425
    It's so hard to predict but some countries seem to be opening up again a bit already. Maybe by November everyone will be keen for a bit of light relief and cinemas will be back open. They can't keep lock down going forever
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    Posts: 14,917
    TripAces wrote: »
    I work in government, and so I know a little about how officials operate: the basic idea is the keep the public's expectations low. The worst thing to do is to give an optimistic report, only for things to fall short. To operate the other way around always works better.

    You need to tell your President that! He seems to think it'll all be gone in a few weeks... :D
  • edited April 2020 Posts: 3,164
    ertert wrote: »
    antovolk wrote: »
    antovolk wrote: »
    octofinger wrote: »
    I think the VOD market would be very small, and it's hard to imagine a pricing structure that would make it worthwhile.

    I'm thinking of the millions of people in, say, southeast Asia who are Bond fans and would gladly stump up a few bucks to see it in cinema, but who don't have a credit card, or access to home streaming.

    $20 to rent for 48 hours is what Universal's been pioneering. And local platforms and solutions - along with global players like iTunes - exist in those territories too. All you need is a laptop or smartphone at least...

    You're being ignorant towards piracy. You will loose a huge chunk of money once that occurs.

    I think the pandemic has to get much worse before we get into a situation where VOD becomes realistic. If it's still a problem in August/September, they'll push NTTD to summer 2021.

    I'm fed up of this 'I want it now!' mentality. People need to be patient and wait for theatres to re-open and this disaster to subside. There are far more pressing issues than whether we get our precious Bond film or not.

    Not necessarily - piracy has always been an issue with home releases and yet Trolls makes double of what it was predicted to theatrically... And how much of the people pirating would have gone to see it in cinemas if they were open? Not all of piracy is necessarily lost sales.

    I still think though if the crisis goes on for longer and cinemas don't reopen by November, the entire business model of theatrical will be changed irrevocably. Not only loads of cinemas - even major chains - may not survive closures that long, audiences will be even more used to consuming content at home. And distributors will have to adapt.

    So do you believe if theaters are still closed in November or even August (when they'd need to start marketing again) they'd seriously consider VOD rather than another delay?

    August - no problem as you don't need cinemas open to start marketing. November - yeah I genuinely think so. Remember that industry consensus for reopenings at the moment is July and many cinemas have cash reserves such that they can stay closed until then - but not necessarily beyond...

    @Getafix they can and they will - if it's not deemed safe enough. That's the #1 priority. Doesn't matter if people are sick of lockdown.
    @matt_u as much power BB may have, it's MGM's call. They paid for the film.
  • Posts: 4,400
    antovolk wrote: »
    ertert wrote: »
    antovolk wrote: »
    antovolk wrote: »
    octofinger wrote: »
    I think the VOD market would be very small, and it's hard to imagine a pricing structure that would make it worthwhile.

    I'm thinking of the millions of people in, say, southeast Asia who are Bond fans and would gladly stump up a few bucks to see it in cinema, but who don't have a credit card, or access to home streaming.

    $20 to rent for 48 hours is what Universal's been pioneering. And local platforms and solutions - along with global players like iTunes - exist in those territories too. All you need is a laptop or smartphone at least...

    You're being ignorant towards piracy. You will loose a huge chunk of money once that occurs.

    I think the pandemic has to get much worse before we get into a situation where VOD becomes realistic. If it's still a problem in August/September, they'll push NTTD to summer 2021.

    I'm fed up of this 'I want it now!' mentality. People need to be patient and wait for theatres to re-open and this disaster to subside. There are far more pressing issues than whether we get our precious Bond film or not.

    Not necessarily - piracy has always been an issue with home releases and yet Trolls makes double of what it was predicted to theatrically... And how much of the people pirating would have gone to see it in cinemas if they were open? Not all of piracy is necessarily lost sales.

    I still think though if the crisis goes on for longer and cinemas don't reopen by November, the entire business model of theatrical will be changed irrevocably. Not only loads of cinemas - even major chains - may not survive closures that long, audiences will be even more used to consuming content at home. And distributors will have to adapt.

    So do you believe if theaters are still closed in November or even August (when they'd need to start marketing again) they'd seriously consider VOD rather than another delay?

    August - no problem as you don't need cinemas open to start marketing. November - yeah I genuinely think so. Remember that industry consensus for reopenings at the moment is July and many cinemas have cash reserves such that they can stay closed until then - but not necessarily beyond...

    @Getafix they can and they will - if it's not deemed safe enough. That's the #1 priority. Doesn't matter if people are sick of lockdown.
    @matt_u as much power BB may have, it's MGM's call. They paid for the film.

    You have totally made your own point against yourself.

    MGM need to make money on box-office from cinemas AND VOD.

    The model you are suggesting sees them loosing their biggest market and instead focussing solely on their second biggest market, namely VOD. Why would anyone in the business world cut out an entire revenue stream? Especially if that revenue stream can produce a gross of $1billion. Even more so in light of your second biggest revenue stream not being comparable to the money you make in the first.

    As I've said before, the economics of blockbuster films rely on global theatrical releases. Otherwise, you can't feasibly turn these big films into moneymakers.

    MGM's tenuous financial position means they are more reliant on theatrical than ever. Releasing straight to VOD is another way to ensure they loose money and potentially destroy their own company.

    As long as MGM is independent, Bond will be a theatrical series and that includes NTTD. If MGM get bought by Netflix or Apple things will change.

    @antovolk your argument is for the birds.
  • edited April 2020 Posts: 3,164
    If cinemas remain closed past November we might not even come back to a world where a film can make a billion at the box office! And all the 2020/21 blockbusters will be anomalies, with studios having to manage budgets in the future to work and be recoupable under new distribution models.

    And no shit, that's why Universal is pioneering a premium rental window, at a similar 90-day interval before going to Blu-ray, DVD, digital purchase to-own with extras and so on. Instead of dropping the film to own straight away.

    Again, I'm only arguing about a VOD release for NTTD *if* and only if cinemas don't open up in November. If cinemas reopen in July, or August, or September as current consensus suggests and cinemas can financially weather without government bailouts, we'll almost certainly have the November release as planned.
  • DaltonCraig007DaltonCraig007 They say, "Evil prevails when good men fail to act." What they ought to say is, "Evil prevails."
    edited April 2020 Posts: 15,689
    @antovolk A question for you, if I may: if cinemas re-open by July/August, but with minimal capacity (say 50% of a full audience at most) for the rest of the year, can studios/cinemas force indie/small budget films to go straight to VOD, so that big tentpole films like Bond, Tenet, Mulan, Black Widow, etc, get extra showings to minimize the tickets lost due to the limited allowed capacity?
  • edited April 2020 Posts: 3,164
    @antovolk A question for you, if I may: if cinemas re-open by July/August, but with minimal capacity (say 50% of a full audience at most) for the rest of the year, can studios/cinemas force indie/small budget films to go straight to VOD, so that big tentpole films like Bond, Tenet, Mulan, Black Widow, etc, get extra showings to minimize the tickets lost due to the limited allowed capacity?

    Yup yup, feels like a foregone conclusion at this point.
    https://www.insider.com/when-will-movie-theaters-reopen-masks-social-distancing-2020-4
    For instance, with regards to Tenet:
    "It's not just showing the movie, but offering so many showtimes as a thank-you to Warner Bros. for having faith in us and not giving up on theatrical," one theater owner told Insider.
  • DaltonCraig007DaltonCraig007 They say, "Evil prevails when good men fail to act." What they ought to say is, "Evil prevails."
    Posts: 15,689
    Thanks for the info @antovolk!
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 8,026
    Thanks for the informed posts, @antovolk

    @Pierce2Daniel the way you change your stance on things makes it seem like there's more than one person in charge of your account. Weren't you in favour of a phased rollout at one point, and downplayed the impact of piracy when everyone else raised it as an issue?

    It doesn't seem like you actually read antovolk's post, either. These are just hypotheticals at this point, not an argument for it.
  • TripAcesTripAces Universal Exports
    Posts: 4,554
    mtm wrote: »
    TripAces wrote: »
    I work in government, and so I know a little about how officials operate: the basic idea is the keep the public's expectations low. The worst thing to do is to give an optimistic report, only for things to fall short. To operate the other way around always works better.

    You need to tell your President that! He seems to think it'll all be gone in a few weeks... :D

    We don't listen to him. LOL
  • Posts: 12,506
    Blofeld has some words of wisdom for those wondering what they should be doing right now...


    Absolutely! =D> :-bd But obviously in the real world it far easier said than done for many people.
  • ResurrectionResurrection Kolkata, India
    Posts: 2,541
    The_Return wrote: »
    Guys, Europe is already starting to open up again (schools in Denmark were reopened this week). Cinemas will reopen LONG before November and NTTD will not be delayed.

    Having said that, I am absolutely stunned that @Getafix wrote that he has no desire to see it on VOD. The way most of us experienced most Bond films was at home on a small screen. I don't dislike DN or TB any less just because I never saw them at the cinemas, and I believe most fans feel the same way.

    If i ever get the opportunity i would definitely want to watch every single bond film in theatre even if i have seen most of them on TV.

    Why not get a projetor to watch them on? It's not the full cinema experience for sure, but it's close to it.

    Close doesn't count, i want the actual cinema experience. At some point i would think of that but not at the moment.
  • Posts: 727
    People are unironically using 2002 music industry arguments against VOD?

    Most people are lazy. They would not seek out pirated versions if the official version is readily available at great quality.

    We saw it in the music industry. Piracy dropped when proper digital versions were supported.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 8,026
    Music videos don't cost hundreds of millions of dollars.
  • The_Return wrote: »
    Guys, Europe is already starting to open up again (schools in Denmark were reopened this week). Cinemas will reopen LONG before November and NTTD will not be delayed.

    Having said that, I am absolutely stunned that @Getafix wrote that he has no desire to see it on VOD. The way most of us experienced most Bond films was at home on a small screen. I don't dislike DN or TB any less just because I never saw them at the cinemas, and I believe most fans feel the same way.

    If i ever get the opportunity i would definitely want to watch every single bond film in theatre even if i have seen most of them on TV.

    Why not get a projetor to watch them on? It's not the full cinema experience for sure, but it's close to it.

    Close doesn't count, i want the actual cinema experience. At some point i would think of that but not at the moment.

    Surely it would improve your home video viewing? Wouldn't you rather watch films at home in a way that is closer to the theatrical experience? My setup is actually probably better than a lot of non mulitplex cinemas.
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    edited April 2020 Posts: 7,526
    The_Return wrote: »
    Guys, Europe is already starting to open up again (schools in Denmark were reopened this week). Cinemas will reopen LONG before November and NTTD will not be delayed.

    Having said that, I am absolutely stunned that @Getafix wrote that he has no desire to see it on VOD. The way most of us experienced most Bond films was at home on a small screen. I don't dislike DN or TB any less just because I never saw them at the cinemas, and I believe most fans feel the same way.

    If i ever get the opportunity i would definitely want to watch every single bond film in theatre even if i have seen most of them on TV.

    Why not get a projetor to watch them on? It's not the full cinema experience for sure, but it's close to it.

    Close doesn't count, i want the actual cinema experience. At some point i would think of that but not at the moment.

    Surely it would improve your home video viewing? Wouldn't you rather watch films at home in a way that is closer to the theatrical experience? My setup is actually probably better than a lot of non mulitplex cinemas.

    I could see a proper home set up would exceed the big-box theatre experience, and it wouldn't even need to be that complex. A big enough TV (or projector) and a good surround sound system (I would think this would be pretty key). Then you could include only those you want to (nobody on phones, talking, etc), no expensive snacks, etc.

    Streaming would be a big no, but the opportunity to download and then watch offline, yes. And I agree having discussed it that the studios would never go this route, but I'm saying it wouldn't be as bad as it may seem.
  • edited April 2020 Posts: 6,675
    Coincidently I bought a 77'' LG some days before total lockdown, so I wouldn't be against it. Not at all. Phones turned off, no popcorn, lights off, no exit signs, no annoying adverts, no interval (yes, they have breaks here). Yes, I'd pay good money for that, I must admit.
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 7,526
    Univex wrote: »
    Coincidently I bought a 77'' LG some days before total lockdown, so I wouldn't be against it. Not at all. Phones turned off, no popcorn, lights off, no exit signs, no annoying adverts, no interval (yes, they have breaks here). Yes, I'd pay good money for that, I must admit.

    Yes, exactly. And there are people who might want an intermission in a nearly-3-hour film, and they'd be able to have it their way as well.
    Again, however, I think the thing most home setups are lacking nowadays are good theatre-class sound. Myself included.
  • DenbighDenbigh UK
    Posts: 5,869
    Honestly I'm happy to wait. If it's released online or whatever (which I don't it will) I'll watch it, but I would 100% prefer seeing it in the cinemas, and no a projector isn't the same haha even if I do have one that I do love :)
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    edited April 2020 Posts: 7,526
    Denbigh wrote: »
    Honestly I'm happy to wait. If it's released online or whatever (which I don't it will) I'll watch it, but I would 100% prefer seeing it in the cinemas, and no a projector isn't the same haha even if I do have one that I do love :)

    Is it just the size of the screen for you then?

    I do think there's something in the energy of being surrounded by people with the same anticipatory excitement as you. But aside from that intangible, I think a good theatre experience is replicable at home.
  • matt_umatt_u better known as Mr. Roark
    edited April 2020 Posts: 4,343
    It’s because watching a Bond film in a theater on day 1 is first and foremost pure excitement, is an experience, beside the obvious technical incomparable aspects.
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    edited April 2020 Posts: 7,526
    matt_u wrote: »
    It’s because watching a Bond film in a theater on day 1 is first and foremost pure excitement, is an experience, beside the obvious technical incomparable aspects.

    I mean there's no point in arguing with any of you on this, because you're obviously set in your ways, but the technical scale of a movie theatre is only the way it is so they can cram as many people into the theatre is possible, so they can make money. If you only have a few people in your living room, all of these "technical incomparable aspects" are obviously scalable. And there's also the cinema 'benefit' of a hundred noisy and annoying strangers.

    May as well just leave it be now, so we can discuss all the new NTTD production news that's breaking. ;)
  • DenbighDenbigh UK
    Posts: 5,869
    matt_u wrote: »
    It’s because watching a Bond film in a theater on day 1 is first and foremost pure excitement, is an experience, beside the obvious technical incomparable aspects.
    Yeah, and it's a tradition for me at this point, as I'm sure it is for others. I've been to every Bond opening cinema night sine Casino Royale, with fond memories of each film. I had London IMAX tickets booked and still want that experience for Craig's last film :)
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