"Go ahead....make my day"...Dirty Harry ,Clint Eastwood discussion.

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  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    Happy Birthday, Mr Eastwood!
    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS9QZptBR_QvCy_K9hGwHWI3aAFwHG8BffW2rGO9AXyPPO9pZE6_Q
  • Posts: 11,189
    Happy birthday indeed.

    Here is a speech from Jim Carey at an Eastwood tribute in the 90s. Quite a few famous faces there including one all of us here know.

  • edited May 2018 Posts: 3,333
    Ha ha... yes, I remember that broadcast well @BAIN123. Carey was very amusing.
  • Posts: 11,189
    bondsum wrote: »
    Ha ha... yes, I remember that broadcast well @BAIN123. Carey was very amusing.

    I used to love Carey in the 90s.
  • DaltonCraig007DaltonCraig007 They say, "Evil prevails when good men fail to act." What they ought to say is, "Evil prevails."
    Posts: 15,696
    Happy birthday, Mr. Clint Eastwood!

    clint_eastwood_the_good_the_bad_and_the_ugly.jpg
    f609346a07f54c7fa4031de49edd2131.jpg
  • Posts: 15,948
    Happy birthday, Clint! My main man!
  • ClarkDevlinClarkDevlin Martinis, Girls and Guns
    Posts: 15,423
    Happy Birthday to The Man!

    Coolest Madafaka to ever live who doesn't take crap from anyone.
  • mattjoesmattjoes DAY OF THE BROSNAN
    Posts: 6,926
    Happy birthday, Clint!
  • Posts: 11,189
    One of my favourite Clint clips:
  • talos7talos7 New Orleans
    edited June 2018 Posts: 8,099
    @mattjoes

    Thanks for this link! I snagged another shot of me and Clint. :D

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  • mattjoesmattjoes DAY OF THE BROSNAN
    Posts: 6,926
    You're welcome, @talos7! After reading your story regarding Tightrope I couldn't help but take a picture of that scene!
  • Posts: 1,904
    I decided to pop in my Blu-ray of Dirty Harry last night as it's been years since I've watched it. Still as enjoyable as it's ever been.

    Had several observations during the viewing:

    -In this PC age it's interesting to revisit films made during a different time when it comes to attitudes and comments and it can almost come across as mildly shocking. And almost 50 years on some of those issues are still with us as far as perps' rights, threats to school children, etc.

    -It's still a really effective thriller as much as a detective/cop actioner. The kidnapped girl in the pit thing and the race against time to rescue her has been done to death in movies since, but it still really holds up here.

    -The big cross Harry meets Scorpio at is really surreal.

    -In a lot of movies, San Francisco looks glamorous, but here it can look as dirty and sleazy as NYC did in the '70s.

    -The bank robbery/do ya' feel lucky punk scene is still a classic and never gets old. Part of the fun is Harry still chewing his hot dog while stopping the robbers.

    -I don't know if it was part of the original cinematography, but there were some awfully dark parts, especially during the pursuit in the stadium.

    -We talk a lot here about modern music scores being unmemorable. Lalo Schifrin's stands out here, adding to the experience. Maybe that theory isn't so far off.

    -I noticed an interesting continuity issue. Harry's lieutenant has a photo of I'm guessing his daughters behind him in his office. The same photo of the two girls later shows up in the D.A.'s office. Maybe they share joint custody?

    -I didn't recall the scene with Chico's wife and Harry discussing his dead wife. That was a pretty powerful scene. It's good there wasn't a forced romance for Harry in this film has some of the sequels had.

    Can't wait to follow up with Magnum Force.

  • ClarkDevlinClarkDevlin Martinis, Girls and Guns
    Posts: 15,423
    All great points made up there!
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,720
    Firefox model just finished. Now I gotta watch my bd of it again...
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  • Posts: 7,000
    BT3366 wrote: »
    I decided to pop in my Blu-ray of Dirty Harry last night as it's been years since I've watched it. Still as enjoyable as it's ever been.

    Had several observations during the viewing:

    -In this PC age it's interesting to revisit films made during a different time when it comes to attitudes and comments and it can almost come across as mildly shocking. And almost 50 years on some of those issues are still with us as far as perps' rights, threats to school children, etc.

    -It's still a really effective thriller as much as a detective/cop actioner. The kidnapped girl in the pit thing and the race against time to rescue her has been done to death in movies since, but it still really holds up here.

    -The big cross Harry meets Scorpio at is really surreal.

    -In a lot of movies, San Francisco looks glamorous, but here it can look as dirty and sleazy as NYC did in the '70s.

    -The bank robbery/do ya' feel lucky punk scene is still a classic and never gets old. Part of the fun is Harry still chewing his hot dog while stopping the robbers.

    -I don't know if it was part of the original cinematography, but there were some awfully dark parts, especially during the pursuit in the stadium.

    -We talk a lot here about modern music scores being unmemorable. Lalo Schifrin's stands out here, adding to the experience. Maybe that theory isn't so far off.

    -I noticed an interesting continuity issue. Harry's lieutenant has a photo of I'm guessing his daughters behind him in his office. The same photo of the two girls later shows up in the D.A.'s office. Maybe they share joint custody?

    -I didn't recall the scene with Chico's wife and Harry discussing his dead wife. That was a pretty powerful scene. It's good there wasn't a forced romance for Harry in this film has some of the sequels had.

    Can't wait to follow up with Magnum Force.

    One of my all time favourite thrillers!
    You didn't mention the scene where Harry talks down the jumper, in his own inimitable way. Director Don Siegel was ill that day that they were to film it, so Clint took over helming the sequence! You can see the difference in style!
  • mattjoesmattjoes DAY OF THE BROSNAN
    Posts: 6,926
    Been meaning to post this for a while for discussion's sake:
    Of all the films I had anything to do with, I like it least. They changed a lot of things in a cheap and distasteful manner. The whole ending is wrong, it wasn't mine at all. All movies had a motorcycle or car chase at the time — except Westerns. They have a scene where this black girl's pimp forces Drano down her throat. In the script, they merely went into the morgue and Harry said, "I don't feel bad for that son of a b****, 'cause two weeks ago one of his girls was in here and he'd poured Drano down her throat." I think it's better to hear about it than to see it later; also, it goes right back to the character again: you understand Harry's feelings about it. All the stuff they put in about the Japanese girl: they put in a scene where the star gets to f*** some girl, and it's pretty hard to get it out. My Dirty Harry scripts never had Harry knowing any girls too well other than hookers, because he was a lonely guy who lived alone and didn't like to associate with people. He could never be close enough to a woman to have any sort of affair. A bitter, lonely man who liked his work

    Source: interview with Milius for Film Comment (by means of Wikipedia)

    I like the film but I must say what Milius describes here regarding the script is better than what wound up in the finished movie. While I don't particularly care about showing or not showing the death of the woman, Harry's line about the pimp gives him more of that edgier attitude he showed in the first film. I don't think it was necessary to underplay that side of the character, even with the vigilante story. And I agree with Milius about Harry being a loner. By having him get together with the Japanese girl who lives down the stairs, the character is somewhat transformed and softened. He was originally presented as this cop who lives on the edge of the law and whose frustration with it and with crime (personally and professionally) made him bitter, curmudgeonly and lonely. If he gets it on with the girl in such an easygoing, amicable way, with no hint of conflict or sadness, the dark side of Harry is diminished. He becomes just a badass cop, rather than the melancholic character he was in the previous film. Beginning with Magnum Force, quasi-love interests were par for the course and while this and the other sequels are good, enjoyable films, I do miss the edgier portrayal of Harry that was present in the original film. The best of the bunch by far.
  • ClarkDevlinClarkDevlin Martinis, Girls and Guns
    Posts: 15,423
    My thoughts exactly, Matt!
  • talos7talos7 New Orleans
    Posts: 8,099
    I think the interaction with the Asian girl could have been done in a more detached manner, from both of them.
    Yes, Harry is a melancholy loner , but hey, even melancholy loners enjoy a romp now and then . For her it could have been much the same. Skillful writing could have shown two detached, isolated people who connect for a moment of passing pleasure.
    It didn’t need to be as glib and cozy.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    Another from the same movie.
  • mattjoesmattjoes DAY OF THE BROSNAN
    Posts: 6,926
    It didn't make much money, and it got bad reviews. Pink Cadillac, that is. But I just watched it and had a blast with it. Clint's moustached showman disguise in Reno and his dumb hillbilly act in the bar scene are pretty funny. Bernadette Peters is very entertaining and shows fine comedy chops, especially in her attempts to escape from Clint's bounty hunter. Good chemistry between the leads. Geoffrey Lewis shows up for a brief and amusing role as a hippie document forger. The bad guys are somewhat generic at first (and at the end, I guess) but Timothy Carhart, John Dennis Johnston and Michael Des Barres make them enjoyable, especially Des Barres' nutcase supremacist. One of the bad guys has a fake ID whose last name I can't repeat here, but it's flat out hilarious.

    One thing this film really got right:
    It didn't kill off Geoffrey Lewis.

    And one thing that surprised me about it, in a good way:
    The main bad guy didn't die at the end, and in fact I don't think many people died at all. Tommy and Lou Ann just drove away. I was expecting a shootout, which happened, but there was no real bloodshed. It was refreshing and in keeping with the light, breezy tone of the film. Good call.
  • R1s1ngs0nR1s1ngs0n France
    Posts: 2,039
    Dirty Harry is probably one of my top 20 favorite movies ever.
    It's brilliant on every level: cinematography, direction, acting, dialogue, music.
    People nowadays tend to talk about Ledger's and Phoenix's Jokers but Andy Robinson's Scorpio trumps them all IMO. It's a performance for the ages and one that is sadly overlooked in discussions/lists including the greatest movie villains.
    Most iconic movie villains are made to be charismatic/sympathetic (Hannibal Lecter, Hans Gruber, Joker, many Bond baddies) but I argue than it's much more difficult to portray a villain that is so irredeemably vile and yet so believable.
    Scorpio is the ultimate cinematic psycho.
  • Fire_and_Ice_ReturnsFire_and_Ice_Returns I am trying to get away from this mountan!
    Posts: 24,197
    R1s1ngs0n wrote: »
    Dirty Harry is probably one of my top 20 favorite movies ever.
    It's brilliant on every level: cinematography, direction, acting, dialogue, music.
    People nowadays tend to talk about Ledger's and Phoenix's Jokers but Andy Robinson's Scorpio trumps them all IMO. It's a performance for the ages and one that is sadly overlooked in discussions/lists including the greatest movie villains.
    Most iconic movie villains are made to be charismatic/sympathetic (Hannibal Lecter, Hans Gruber, Joker, many Bond baddies) but I argue than it's much more difficult to portray a villain that is so irredeemably vile and yet so believable.
    Scorpio is the ultimate cinematic psycho.

    The first Dirty Harry film is definately one of the best in the genre, when I rewatched them on Bluray a few years ago I was pleasantly surprised that it was even greater than I remember, the direction is inventive and brilliant.
  • Posts: 15,948
    R1s1ngs0n wrote: »
    Dirty Harry is probably one of my top 20 favorite movies ever.
    It's brilliant on every level: cinematography, direction, acting, dialogue, music.
    People nowadays tend to talk about Ledger's and Phoenix's Jokers but Andy Robinson's Scorpio trumps them all IMO. It's a performance for the ages and one that is sadly overlooked in discussions/lists including the greatest movie villains.
    Most iconic movie villains are made to be charismatic/sympathetic (Hannibal Lecter, Hans Gruber, Joker, many Bond baddies) but I argue than it's much more difficult to portray a villain that is so irredeemably vile and yet so believable.
    Scorpio is the ultimate cinematic psycho.

    Well said.
  • Posts: 7,000
    R1s1ngs0n wrote: »
    Dirty Harry is probably one of my top 20 favorite movies ever.
    It's brilliant on every level: cinematography, direction, acting, dialogue, music.
    People nowadays tend to talk about Ledger's and Phoenix's Jokers but Andy Robinson's Scorpio trumps them all IMO. It's a performance for the ages and one that is sadly overlooked in discussions/lists including the greatest movie villains.
    Most iconic movie villains are made to be charismatic/sympathetic (Hannibal Lecter, Hans Gruber, Joker, many Bond baddies) but I argue than it's much more difficult to portray a villain that is so irredeemably vile and yet so believable.
    Scorpio is the ultimate cinematic psycho.

    Couldnt agree more. One of my all time favourite thrillers. Don Siegels direction is superb.
    Scorpios scene with the kids on the bus still frightens the life out of me!
    Interesting, the orginal script had Scorpio being shot by a police sniper at the airport!
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    Saw Cry Macho recently. Nothing outstanding, but another heartwarming film from Eastwood. I think it s fantastic that he is still working both in front of and behind the camera. The man is over 90. Living legend for so many reasons.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,809
    I'm very happy to see all the love for DH.

    Up yours, Pauline Kael!
  • Posts: 15,948
    I love every frame of DIRTY HARRY. One of the greatest films of all time in that genre.
    I think my personal favorite, though might be SUDDEN IMPACT.
  • mattjoesmattjoes DAY OF THE BROSNAN
    Posts: 6,926
    ToTheRight wrote: »
    I love every frame of DIRTY HARRY. One of the greatest films of all time in that genre.
    I think my personal favorite, though might be SUDDEN IMPACT.

    Paul Drake plays such a total scumbag in this film, it's ridiculous. You can't wait for Harry to just shoot the bastard.
  • Posts: 15,948
    mattjoes wrote: »
    ToTheRight wrote: »
    I love every frame of DIRTY HARRY. One of the greatest films of all time in that genre.
    I think my personal favorite, though might be SUDDEN IMPACT.

    Paul Drake plays such a total scumbag in this film, it's ridiculous. You can't wait for Harry to just shoot the bastard.

    He's a good villain, IMO. Well cast and creepy. He's kind of forgotten, really. He did a excellent job.
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