The James Bond Wardrobe/Style Thread

1474850525356

Comments

  • I don't get it. The description says Madeleine's dress is green, but it seems light blue to me. :-/
  • HMBFFHMBFF Lisboa, Portugal
    Posts: 202
    I don't get it. The description says Madeleine's dress is green, but it seems light blue to me. :-/

    http://www.jamesbondlifestyle.com/news/ultimate-guide-spectre-bond-24-products-and-locations#ghost
  • Posts: 630
    What Omega is Craig wearing in the Mexico scene in the final trailer? It looks like an Aqua Terra on my screen.
  • doubleoegodoubleoego #LightWork
    Posts: 11,090
    Yep it's the aqua terra master coaxial.
  • edited October 2015 Posts: 630
    Thanks, DoubleO! I like the aesthetic of the diving bezel on the Seamaster, PO, and 300, but the ATs are a sight to behold as well! Whenever the time comes, it's going to be hard to pick one to purchase!
  • Red_SnowRed_Snow Australia
    Posts: 2,172
    This Is the Story Behind the New James Bond Film's Makeup.

    Pret-a-Reporter: What is your process like when you first start working on a film?

    Naomi Donne: We start with the script—I read through it, making notes and starting to pull any reference that might be relevant to the characters we’re trying to create. Then I sit down with [director] Sam Mendes and go through the script character by character, and any relevant actions or situations that will affect how they look. Then the actor comes in and we go through their feelings about the character they’re creating, and we merge that all together. Then we start a long series of camera tests to see what works best with the lighting, sets and costumes. It’s usually takes around six weeks.

    So just how did you pull off getting 1,500 extras through hair and makeup in one day?

    I sent a team of five makeup artists from the UK who I work with a lot a ton of references and a very strong idea of what I wanted. They started makeup fittings with the costume fittings, so everybody was made up before we shot them. Every day they’d email me every image of every makeup they’d done, and I gave notes or approval on each. At the end of each day I was getting hundreds and hundreds of makeup to approve. On the day of we had 120 makeup artists and dressers — apart from the few from the UK we used Mexican hairdressers and makeup artists and they were phenomenally good. We got through it in two and a half hours, which was a miracle. I thought it would take five. We had to use makeup that would stay on in the heat and long shooting hours, so we used MAC Chromacake ($27) and airbrush makeup so it lasted well. Mexico was the most challenging [location] logistically — creatively challenging in every possible way, and incredibly rewarding when we pulled it off.

    It must have seemed easy to do everyone else’s makeup after that! Tell us about the lead Bond woman this time around. What was her look?

    Lea Seydoux actually has quite a natural look — Sam wanted her to look very fresh and natural. There are times when she’s wearing a little bit of makeup when she’s in a professional situation, but it’s very light because he wanted to see what was going on with her. She’s a character who has a lot of depth, it’s written in the film. Sometimes makeup can be a bit of an obstruction or distraction and he wanted it to be very open. There’s a scene where she is very dressed up and has quite a glamorous look, and it’s quite a good contrast with the rest of the movie. I dyed her eyebrows very dark; it gives a really strong look. She loved that. She’s one of those actors who’s fearless, very confident.

    Were there any fun special effects in Spectre?

    We had a sequence with someone bleeding and Sam decided he wanted to do it, so I gave him the blood and he applied it. It was really funny, he was so proud of himself. He’s a repressed makeup artist, very good — it must be his artistic personality.

    What about makeup on Bond himself?

    I don’t do Daniel Craig’s makeup. I did Christoph Waltz, who hardly needs any makeup at all. He has strong features and he doesn’t like makeup or need it. When you’re working with men who tend to not want to wear makeup, you just make sure their skincare is good, that they’re well moisturized. Ralph Fiennes wears a little bit of makeup, only to enhance his features. With actors you can do something like pluck their eyebrows very carefully to open up their eyes, or occasionally dye their lashes if you need definition without makeup. I’m very careful.
  • AVBAVB
    Posts: 97
    Does anyone know what Bonds navy outer jacket from the Mr.White scene is?

    Thanks in advance!
  • jake24jake24 Sitting at your desk, kissing your lover, eating supper with your familyModerator
    Posts: 10,547
    Red_Snow wrote: »
    This Is the Story Behind the New James Bond Film's Makeup.

    Pret-a-Reporter: What is your process like when you first start working on a film?

    Naomi Donne: We start with the script—I read through it, making notes and starting to pull any reference that might be relevant to the characters we’re trying to create. Then I sit down with [director] Sam Mendes and go through the script character by character, and any relevant actions or situations that will affect how they look. Then the actor comes in and we go through their feelings about the character they’re creating, and we merge that all together. Then we start a long series of camera tests to see what works best with the lighting, sets and costumes. It’s usually takes around six weeks.

    So just how did you pull off getting 1,500 extras through hair and makeup in one day?

    I sent a team of five makeup artists from the UK who I work with a lot a ton of references and a very strong idea of what I wanted. They started makeup fittings with the costume fittings, so everybody was made up before we shot them. Every day they’d email me every image of every makeup they’d done, and I gave notes or approval on each. At the end of each day I was getting hundreds and hundreds of makeup to approve. On the day of we had 120 makeup artists and dressers — apart from the few from the UK we used Mexican hairdressers and makeup artists and they were phenomenally good. We got through it in two and a half hours, which was a miracle. I thought it would take five. We had to use makeup that would stay on in the heat and long shooting hours, so we used MAC Chromacake ($27) and airbrush makeup so it lasted well. Mexico was the most challenging [location] logistically — creatively challenging in every possible way, and incredibly rewarding when we pulled it off.

    It must have seemed easy to do everyone else’s makeup after that! Tell us about the lead Bond woman this time around. What was her look?

    Lea Seydoux actually has quite a natural look — Sam wanted her to look very fresh and natural. There are times when she’s wearing a little bit of makeup when she’s in a professional situation, but it’s very light because he wanted to see what was going on with her. She’s a character who has a lot of depth, it’s written in the film. Sometimes makeup can be a bit of an obstruction or distraction and he wanted it to be very open. There’s a scene where she is very dressed up and has quite a glamorous look, and it’s quite a good contrast with the rest of the movie. I dyed her eyebrows very dark; it gives a really strong look. She loved that. She’s one of those actors who’s fearless, very confident.

    Were there any fun special effects in Spectre?

    We had a sequence with someone bleeding and Sam decided he wanted to do it, so I gave him the blood and he applied it. It was really funny, he was so proud of himself. He’s a repressed makeup artist, very good — it must be his artistic personality.

    What about makeup on Bond himself?

    I don’t do Daniel Craig’s makeup. I did Christoph Waltz, who hardly needs any makeup at all. He has strong features and he doesn’t like makeup or need it. When you’re working with men who tend to not want to wear makeup, you just make sure their skincare is good, that they’re well moisturized. Ralph Fiennes wears a little bit of makeup, only to enhance his features. With actors you can do something like pluck their eyebrows very carefully to open up their eyes, or occasionally dye their lashes if you need definition without makeup. I’m very careful.

    That was an interesting read. Thanks for posting!
  • edited October 2015 Posts: 372
    For the Dutch folks out there, here is an informal interview with Jany at the expo about Bond's costumes: http://www.npo.nl/nff2015-interview-jany-temime/29-09-2015/WO_VPRO_2135441
    I'm not sure if people outside the Netherlands have access to this video, but you get a great up-close view of the clothes. They're talking about the white tuxedo and blue/green dress. Anyway, I translated what she says from the very first question the interviewer asked onwards. Hoyte van Hoytema also makes a few comments, and I think that's interesting because you get a sense of the interaction that takes place between people such as cinematographers and costume designers, as opposed to thinking they're confined to their own compartment. Some things may be a little lost in translation.

    Interviewer:Can you tell us about all the things involved when desiging costumes for a big movie?
    Jany Temime: Now you ony see two costumes here. They're actually well-chosen because it's Bond in his new tuxedo. I gave him a white tuxedo because the movie is situated in Morocco, and I immediately thought of Casablanca en Humphrey Bogart. So I wanted to give him a white tuxedo as an homage to Casablanca but also to the ambiance of the desert, the train. And her [LOOKING TOWARDS THE DRESS], I wanted to give her a dress of the same ambiance. I also wanted, as you can see here on the picture [POINTS TOWARD PICTURE OF LEA WALKING], that she almost seemed naked. That's the first time we see her.
    Interviewer: So it's a very thin fabric?
    Jany: Yes, I wanted you to see her body in motion, and it turned out perfect.
    Interview: It turned out perfect!
    Jany: That's exactly what I wanted. And I said to Hoyte van Hoytema: 'I want you to see her body'.
    Hoyte van Hoytema: [POINTS TOWARDS PICTURE OF LEA WALKING] You can see the highlights of her legs, how it's shaped and how it turns out, how that shadow here... Yes, it was very exciting to shoot, and brillantly thought of by Jany and brilliantly designed. This one I find very interesting as well...[TOUCHES WHITE TUXEDO JACKET]
    Jany: It's not just your lighting, it's also my dress. [LAUGHS]
    Hoyte: Yes, yes. [LAUGHS]
    Interviewer: Do you ever tell someone, it doesn't have to be Hoyte, but someone working on this movie: 'Hey, you can't do this, you're ruining my dress'?
    Jany: Well, with Hoyte I'm more direct than with other cinematographers.
    Interviewer (to Hoyte): And then what does she say?
    Hoyte: [GRINS]
    Jany: Yeah, but it's normal. You're not being stern, you're fighting for your idea.
    Hoyte: Jany has, if that's what you mean, a lot of persuasiveness. She comes up to you and says: 'You cannot shoot that, it looks like shit, I want this other costume. You don't want the brown one, I put the blue one on'.
    Jany: [LAUGHS]
    Interview: When I told people I was going to interview you, they say: '[GASP] She touched Daniel Craig!'.
    Jany, interrupting: 'She's so fantastic'.
    interviewer: [LAUGHS] They say that too.
    Jany: [LAUGHS] Yeah, everywhere. Yeah, I often see him naked, it's true.
    Interview: And what's that like, is something the people at home wanna know.
    Jany: You talk about muscles, they're there. He has a fantastic body.
    Interviewer: If you now look at all the work you've done, all suits, all costumes that you designed, what exactly makes a suit...
    Jany: Special? The man who's wearing it.
    Interviewer: But your designs...
    Jany: It's not my design, it's the person inside. A piece of clothing on a hanger is just a piece of clothing. A piece of clothing on an actor is a costume.
    Interviewer: And you make it come alive?
    Jany: I give them something to wear.
  • SirHilaryBraySirHilaryBray Scotland
    edited October 2015 Posts: 2,138
    I
    AVB wrote: »
    Does anyone know what Bonds navy outer jacket from the Mr.White scene is?

    Thanks in advance!


    Hi AVB,
    This one http://assets.heart.co.uk/2015/29/daniel-craig-james-bond-in-spectre-1437557681.jpg

    been much discussion about that since the first trailer. It is believed to be a Tom Ford. I am 100% certain it is, the give away the over sized shirt collar style, it's a Tom Ford thing and something Dan favours. Almost like a woollen Harrington or Wind Cheater. Believed to be part of Fall/Winter Collection 2015.

    This one is similar by Ted Baker. But see how this one has a standard size shirt collar, now compare it to the small standard collar on the Ted Baker.
    http://www.houseoffraser.co.uk/Ted+Baker+Maxwell+drawn+wool+harrington/225285512,default,pd.html

    Then go back to QOS and look at the over size collar on the Harrington
    http://www.filmjackets.com/FEATURES/IMAGES/feature_007quantum_of_solace1-big.jpg

    Basically the Spectre Jacket is a winter version od the same jacket.
  • Posts: 567
    @SuzanneStone - thank you for the translation - very interesting how to see how Jany and Hoye work together.
  • AVBAVB
    Posts: 97
    SirHilary, thankyou for the reply. I'm going to buy the Ted Baker one I think. I actually thought that Craig had an outer jacket and some sort of lighter cardigan type affair underneath!
  • SirHilaryBraySirHilaryBray Scotland
    edited October 2015 Posts: 2,138
    AVB wrote: »
    SirHilary, thankyou for the reply. I'm going to buy the Ted Baker one I think. I actually thought that Craig had an outer jacket and some sort of lighter cardigan type affair underneath!

    This image gives that perception

    http://i.imgur.com/r5Kc9q6.jpg?1

    but as you can see by the second image the jacket appears to have like a windbreaker layer which the zip parts are layered upon giving that impression. It could be that it has a double zip. IF you by the Ted Baker Mind and wear your collar up! size up so you can get the heavy sweater underneath.
  • AVBAVB
    Posts: 97
    Yes, the Harrington style jackets always come up small. I have a Baracuta which unfortunately does not fit anymore - British classic! I'd love to have seen Craig wear one instead of the Tom Ford jacket in QoS.
  • I am huge fan of Bond dinner suits, there isn't any doubt that donning am Ivory white tuxedo is the great way in paying tribute to Sean Connery and change the look after wearing two consecutive midnight blue tuxedo. I personally believe that Tom Ford should go with black tuxedo just like Craig's Casino Royale one. it would look more better on him. What's your opinion guys ??
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited October 2015 Posts: 23,883
    Alexedward wrote: »
    I am huge fan of Bond dinner suits, there isn't any doubt that donning am Ivory white tuxedo is the great way in paying tribute to Sean Connery and change the look after wearing two consecutive midnight blue tuxedo. I personally believe that Tom Ford should go with black tuxedo just like Craig's Casino Royale one. it would look more better on him. What's your opinion guys ??

    I personally agree. While the white tux is a nice tribute touch, I don't think it looks all that good on DC (due to his height/frame/hair colour etc.), at least based on the trailer clips. It was more suited to Sean due to his frame/hair colour etc.

    DC looked superb in the CR tux and yes, I think that would be the better look for him, imho. Lindy Hemming gets some flack for her work on CR but I think it is unwarranted. She established the new look for DC in CR, and I'm sure had she not retired she would have transitioned him out of Brioni (which Brosnan used to wear) into something more suitable for DC's rugged frame.

    crtux-main1_0.jpg
  • MurdockMurdock Mr. 2000
    Posts: 16,058
    That's a stunning tux. I want one. :D
  • dominicgreenedominicgreene The Eternal QOS Defender
    Posts: 1,756
    Murdock wrote: »
    That's a stunning tux. I want one. :D

    I wouldn't surprised if Craig's tie was $1000.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    A few more from CR that just scream 'Bond'
    MTI5MDAwMDMyMzQ2MTYzMjEw.jpg

    VrGjMJr4.jpg

    1e351315267281c242923bdc79f43a9e.jpg
  • MurdockMurdock Mr. 2000
    Posts: 16,058
    That first one could be made into a CR novel book cover. I love it.
  • SarkSark Guangdong, PRC
    Posts: 1,138
    It's amazing how much the fit of his tuxedo changed between CR and SF.
  • imranbecksimranbecks Singapore
    Posts: 902
    The two Omega watches Bond will wear in Spectre. One is the Aqua Terra model ref no.23110422103003 which he will wear in the early part of the movie, the other one, which will probably be worn throughout the rest of the movie would be the Seamaster 300 on Nato model ref no.23332412101001.

    21878010670_2aae677207_c.jpg
    22053785672_01930cdddc_c.jpg
  • doubleoegodoubleoego #LightWork
    Posts: 11,090
    Yes these are the two watches, however, he wears the Aqua Terra at the start and again towards the end of the movie (Mexico and London)as evidenced by the trailers.
  • leas_mole wrote: »
    @SuzanneStone - thank you for the translation - very interesting how to see how Jany and Hoye work together.

    No problem. (:

    To tell you the truth, what surprised me was how she said Humphrey Bogart was the inspiration behind the white dinner jacket, as opposed to saying it was Sean Connery.
    But it's nice to see her and Hoyte getting along well.
  • Posts: 1,199
    How could the white dinner jacket really been inspired by Bogart instead of
    Connery? Really?!?!? There's no carnation on Bogie's jacket..........................
  • andmcit wrote: »
    Those trousers look like they're a leotard / shrink to fit second skin jeans and an inch or two too short (for the dummy)

    The trousers say it all. They are ridiculous. Why can't they just get Bond a decent tailor and forget this fashion nonsense?
    Style forever - fashion never!

  • AVBAVB
    Posts: 97
    doubleoego wrote: »
    In SF he was made to look somewhat terrible and burned out and his look was punctuated with the short hair cut that added to his off-kilter look. I stood feet away from him at the Royal Premiere and he looked noticeably different, younger, compared to how he looked in SF.

    He definitely had work done before that premiere. But it matter little.

    Bond should look a little rough round the edges. All men do when they get into their 40's.

  • Red_SnowRed_Snow Australia
    Posts: 2,172
    Bond Girl has Daniel Craig’s Measure on the Set of the New Bond Movie Spectre

    IF the suit fits … James Bond star Daniel Craig has 50 more just like it hanging in his dressing room trailer.

    Behind every immaculately-dressed super spy, says costume designer Jany Temime, is an army of craftsmen and women labouring over every stitch.

    “When he has to ride a motor bike, we add some length to the sleeves. When he has to climb, we put a toggle on the back to hold him. When he has to wear pads for certain stunts, we make the trousers bigger,” she explains on the set of Craig’s fourth Bond movie, Spectre, in Mexico City.

    A “prototype” Bond suit takes about three months to complete.

    “The Italian tailors of Tom Ford, they really are artists,” says Temime.

    “They spend hours on each fitting. They move the hem of the trouser up half a centimetre and they say: oh, bene!

    “They can talk about a cuff for 30 minutes. I love that.”

    Craig says that as a struggling actor, he could only fantasise about owning a bespoke suit.

    “They wear beautifully. They don’t tear. They don’t rip. I have squatted down a lot in these suits and I haven’t lost an arse yet.”

    Unless the visual effects department clears it first.

    According to Temime, 20 of these high end fashion garments can be destroyed in a single action sequence.

    The glamorous Frenchwoman is sitting on the rooftop balcony of the opulent Gran Hotel Ciudad overlooking Mexico City’s historic Zocalo Square.

    Below her swarm 1500 ghoulish extras who have been assembled by director Sam Mendes to recreate the annual Day of the Dead parade for Spectre’s jaw-dropping opening chase.

    The authorities have closed down Mexico City’s downtown quarter for almost two weeks to enable the filmmakers to get the footage they need.

    Stunt helicopter pilot Chuck Aaron has been flying repeatedly past the windows of the Palacio National for days, so close he must surely have ruffled the president’s papers.

    At times, the thwup-thwup-thwup of the rotor blades has been punctuated by thus-far unexplained explosions - after which Craig has emerged dusty and rumpled.

    “It’s a big complicated sequence and we had to get a lot of cooperation – which we have done and we are thrilled,’’ says veteran producer Barbara Broccoli, daughter of franchise founder Albert.

    “We are causing a lot of disruption but it’s a beautiful festival and I think (the Mexican people) really appreciate us putting it on film.”

    In a medium now dominated by CGI, Bond is one of the few remaining franchises that can still command a big enough budget to do things for real.

    “I have done a lot of big movies and I have never been on a set like the one today. It’s extraordinary,” enthuses Craig, clearly galvanised by the eyebrow-singing nature of his work.

    “It’s very rare to have (this) many extras on a movie and the scope … the helicopter … you have got to take full advantage of that.”

    Collaborating with Craig on his most extreme action sequences is second unit director Alexander Witt (Skyfall, Terminator Genisys, X-Men: First Class).

    “He is genuinely one of the bravest people I have met,’’ says Craig.

    “I have been hanging off the side of trains, hanging out the side of buildings, and Alexander is there on a rope with me - with a camera on his shoulder.”

    Craig isn’t too far from the action, either, in today’s impressive helicopter stunt, which see Aaron deftly manoeuvre his aircraft between the city’s buildings.

    Despite the inconvenience and upheaval posed by such a large scale enterprise, the Mexican authorities lobbied hard to land a role in Spectre, banking on 007’s ability to put a more positive spin on the country’s image, tarnished by a war on drugs that has claimed more than 100,000 lives since 2006.

    The franchise’s commitment to old school, trousers-up production values explains both the enduring success of the Daniel Craig reboot, and Spectre’s $300 million plus budget - which puts it on track to become the most expensive movie ever made.

    Each of the extras on the Day of the Dead set has spent at least an hour and a half in make-up. Every painted face is unique.

    The same goes for the fabulously flamboyant costumes, one group inspired by the colourful folkloric outfits made famous by Mexican artist Frida Kahlo.

    The attention to detail carries all the way down to Temine’s own choice of outfit. The glamorous Frenchwoman, whose credits include Skyfall and Gravity, has picked out a Prada shirt with a stylish gun motif for today’s press interviews because, well, it “seemed appropriate.”

    Temime designs Craig’s suits in consultation with the actor and fashion designer Tom Ford, who has directed one extremely classy film himself (A Single Man.)

    “You couldn’t make any man look like Daniel Craig because Daniel Craig is also gorgeous naked - trust me,’’ she says.

    “But everybody wears my suits very well. The secret? Well, they are so well made, they don’t weigh anything. And they hide every single flaw - they hide that little belly, give you a waist or a little more shoulder ...”

    Italian beauty Monica Bellucci, who at 50 is the oldest Bond girl ever to be cast, is just as well looked after in the sartorial department.

    “It’s not a question of age, it’s a question of style,’’ says Temime.

    “The difference is that the Bond girls are usually girls and (Monica Bellucci) is a woman. She is mature. She knows more than he knows or at least as much as he knows. And I think that equality is actually much more modern than the fact that she is the same age as him or older.”

    Taking her cue from the curvaceous appeal of 50s stars such as Sophia Loren and Gina Lollobrigida, Temime’s wardrobe department even designed the character’s underwear.

    “That was very important. I wanted to make a parallel between her underwear and the sexuality of a mature woman,’’ she says.

    “You can have young girls in bikinis but in the case of Monica Bellucci, her underwear is extremely beautiful and sophisticated - not to cover up but as an expression of her sexuality.”

    Bellucci, it turns out, is no less of a woman off screen, turning down the pair of Ugh boots that were presented to her at the beginning of the production (a traditional, between-takes foot comfort concession for female actors).

    “She is not one of us, no no no!” says Temime. “She is feminine from top to toe. She stepped out of the trailer in 12 inch Louboutin heels.”
  • Red_Snow wrote: »
    Bond Girl has Daniel Craig’s Measure on the Set of the New Bond Movie Spectre

    IF the suit fits … James Bond star Daniel Craig has 50 more just like it hanging in his dressing room trailer.

    Yes but at no stage in this lengthy piece does she explain why none of these 50 suits actually fit him correctly.
    And sorry, Tom Ford doesn't do bespoke. He does off the peg or made to measure!
    It's high time 007 got himself a good Savile Row tailor. Perhaps the new sartorially correct 'M' could give him a recommendation?
  • SirHilaryBraySirHilaryBray Scotland
    edited October 2015 Posts: 2,138
    Red_Snow wrote: »
    Bond Girl has Daniel Craig’s Measure on the Set of the New Bond Movie Spectre

    IF the suit fits … James Bond star Daniel Craig has 50 more just like it hanging in his dressing room trailer.

    Yes but at no stage in this lengthy piece does she explain why none of these 50 suits actually fit him correctly.
    And sorry, Tom Ford doesn't do bespoke. He does off the peg or made to measure!
    It's high time 007 got himself a good Savile Row tailor. Perhaps the new sartorially correct 'M' could give him a recommendation?

    If you go back and watch Jany speak on wardrobe in Skyfall she explained that Craig and Mendes wanted different versions of each suit which allowed Dan to move certain ways in certain scenes. She approached Brinoni and they said they could not fulfill such an order. Jany reached out and Tom Ford said that they could do everything they needed. If Brioni couldn't fulfill the order what chance would someone like Anthony Sinclair have? Said it before the Slim/skinny fit suits Dan's gritty Bond. Dan is broad shouldered you put him in Tailor cut, the suits hang off his shoulder and don't compliment his physique. I have the same issue I go slim fit it's more modern & complimentary to the stature.
Sign In or Register to comment.