Last Movie you Watched?

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  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,107
    Batman V Superman I watch this film alot though the action scenes in Ultra HD are bloody intense, this film is such an immersive experience in 4K.

    It s a good one. Shame about the horrendous villain.
  • Posts: 13,951
    Batman V Superman I watch this film alot though the action scenes in Ultra HD are bloody intense, this film is such an immersive experience in 4K.

    It s a good one. Shame about the horrendous villain.

    Which one ;)

    Just watched Captain America Civil War I think this film is great, a good balance between reality and fantastical. This film is my second favorite Marvel film.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Digitalia
    Posts: 40,107
    Batman V Superman I watch this film alot though the action scenes in Ultra HD are bloody intense, this film is such an immersive experience in 4K.

    It s a good one. Shame about the horrendous villain.

    Which one ;)

    Pick one.
  • MayDayDiVicenzoMayDayDiVicenzo Here and there
    Posts: 5,065
    Fargo (1996)

    What a great little film. I admit I couldn't get into the TV series but the film is an understated gem.
  • Posts: 13,951
    Batman V Superman I watch this film alot though the action scenes in Ultra HD are bloody intense, this film is such an immersive experience in 4K.

    It s a good one. Shame about the horrendous villain.

    Which one ;)

    Pick one.

    David Goyer
  • Posts: 13,951
    Dirty Harry It's been over twenty years since I watched this, the transfer on Bluray has me drooling it's like watching a great film for the first time. There are scenes with dirt and grain though it's welcome for the tone of this excellent movie.
  • Posts: 19,339
    Dirty Harry It's been over twenty years since I watched this, the transfer on Bluray has me drooling it's like watching a great film for the first time. There are scenes with dirt and grain though it's welcome for the tone of this excellent movie.

    You really want Scorpio to get a kick-in from Harry dont you..and he does.

  • Posts: 13,951
    barryt007 wrote: »
    Dirty Harry It's been over twenty years since I watched this, the transfer on Bluray has me drooling it's like watching a great film for the first time. There are scenes with dirt and grain though it's welcome for the tone of this excellent movie.

    You really want Scorpio to get a kick-in from Harry dont you..and he does.

    Man this film looked awesome, Scorpio is a piece of... good acting from Andrew J. Robinson
  • Posts: 19,339
    barryt007 wrote: »
    Dirty Harry It's been over twenty years since I watched this, the transfer on Bluray has me drooling it's like watching a great film for the first time. There are scenes with dirt and grain though it's welcome for the tone of this excellent movie.

    You really want Scorpio to get a kick-in from Harry dont you..and he does.

    Man this film looked awesome, Scorpio is a piece of... good acting from Andrew J. Robinson

    He was seriously mad eh ? shooting a priest or a *******...

    Its the fact he keeps getting away with it and even gets beaten up to frame Harry that makes you so determined to back Callahan !!

    Brilliant film...i love all the Dirty Harry's....i mean,its Clint !!
  • Posts: 13,951
    barryt007 wrote: »
    barryt007 wrote: »
    Dirty Harry It's been over twenty years since I watched this, the transfer on Bluray has me drooling it's like watching a great film for the first time. There are scenes with dirt and grain though it's welcome for the tone of this excellent movie.

    You really want Scorpio to get a kick-in from Harry dont you..and he does.

    Man this film looked awesome, Scorpio is a piece of... good acting from Andrew J. Robinson

    He was seriously mad eh ? shooting a priest or a *******...

    Its the fact he keeps getting away with it and even gets beaten up to frame Harry that makes you so determined to back Callahan !!

    Brilliant film...i love all the Dirty Harry's....i mean,its Clint !!

    Bluray Boxset arrived today I grew up with Clint's films, got five days off now so a Dirty Harry binge watch for me, Tightrope arrived today also, I'll watch that between Sudden Impact and Dead Pool.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    Dirty Harry is a bona fide classic. I must give it a rewatch soon. Coincidentally, I'm watching the great Clint being a badass right now (In The Line of Fire). Rene Russo looks great here.
  • ClarkDevlinClarkDevlin Martinis, Girls and Guns
    Posts: 15,423
    The most hideous film that Clint did in his heyday can very well beat a "critically acclaimed" film made today.
  • Posts: 19,339
    barryt007 wrote: »
    barryt007 wrote: »
    Dirty Harry It's been over twenty years since I watched this, the transfer on Bluray has me drooling it's like watching a great film for the first time. There are scenes with dirt and grain though it's welcome for the tone of this excellent movie.

    You really want Scorpio to get a kick-in from Harry dont you..and he does.

    Man this film looked awesome, Scorpio is a piece of... good acting from Andrew J. Robinson

    He was seriously mad eh ? shooting a priest or a *******...

    Its the fact he keeps getting away with it and even gets beaten up to frame Harry that makes you so determined to back Callahan !!

    Brilliant film...i love all the Dirty Harry's....i mean,its Clint !!

    Bluray Boxset arrived today I grew up with Clint's films, got five days off now so a Dirty Harry binge watch for me, Tightrope arrived today also, I'll watch that between Sudden Impact and Dead Pool.

    God you are a lucky lucky chap...if only !!
    bondjames wrote: »
    Dirty Harry is a bona fide classic. I must give it a rewatch soon. Coincidentally, I'm watching the great Clint being a badass right now (In The Line of Fire). Rene Russo looks great here.

    Malkovic is a brilliant villain (Bond quality) in that.
  • Posts: 4,079
    bondjames wrote: »
    Dirty Harry is a bona fide classic. I must give it a rewatch soon. Coincidentally, I'm watching the great Clint being a badass right now (In The Line of Fire). Rene Russo looks great here.
    Love it, especially the part where
    Malkovich puts the gun in his mouth. Extravagant yet brilliant touch. And the score is terrific, especially when Eastwood takes the bullet for the president.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited April 2018 Posts: 23,883
    barryt007 wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    Dirty Harry is a bona fide classic. I must give it a rewatch soon. Coincidentally, I'm watching the great Clint being a badass right now (In The Line of Fire). Rene Russo looks great here.

    Malkovic is a brilliant villain (Bond quality) in that.
    Agreed. He's in top form and the back and forth with Eastwood is really good. I've always enjoyed this film.
    mattjoes wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    Dirty Harry is a bona fide classic. I must give it a rewatch soon. Coincidentally, I'm watching the great Clint being a badass right now (In The Line of Fire). Rene Russo looks great here.
    Love it, especially the part where
    Malkovich puts the gun in his mouth. Extravagant yet brilliant touch. And the score is terrific, especially when Eastwood takes the bullet for the president.
    Agreed. Superb scene. The character work in this film is really good too. They're all interesting.
  • Posts: 4,807
    My favorite part of Dirty Harry is that cartwheel Scorpio does when Harry shoots him across the football field :))
  • ClarkDevlinClarkDevlin Martinis, Girls and Guns
    Posts: 15,423
    mattjoes wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    Dirty Harry is a bona fide classic. I must give it a rewatch soon. Coincidentally, I'm watching the great Clint being a badass right now (In The Line of Fire). Rene Russo looks great here.
    Love it, especially the part where
    Malkovich puts the gun in his mouth. Extravagant yet brilliant touch. And the score is terrific, especially when Eastwood takes the bullet for the president.
    That's exactly the moment I remember whenever I think of the film.
  • Posts: 13,951
    Got to love Dirty Harry's unorthodox methods

    @barryt007 been working way too much overtime, a mini break is a godsend lol
  • Posts: 4,079
    My favorite part of Dirty Harry is that cartwheel Scorpio does when Harry shoots him across the football field :))
    I feel I'm gonna start to sound like a broken record, but that's a great scene. Paraphrasing, and if I'm not misremembering, Don Siegel said the shot with the camera "flying" away from the stadium and the fog engulfing the characters was meant to symbolize how both Scorpio and Harry had crossed ethical boundaries, and thus were both "tainted." Scorpio for obvious reasons, and Harry because he tortured him to find out the girl's whereabouts. Dirty Harry is the best, the most provocative and the edgiest of the five films. It's a thought experiment. It takes all this talk about the criminal's rights and pushes it to the extreme by presenting us the most despicable villain they could portray and forcing us to consider the situation. It's also the most narratively single-minded of the films, brutally efficient in how almost every scene advances the story with basically no distractions, save for the few intended to flesh out Harry and address Chico's situation after being shot.
  • Posts: 19,339
    Just created a Dirty Harry/Clint thread peeps !!!
  • Posts: 3,135
    mattjoes wrote: »
    My favorite part of Dirty Harry is that cartwheel Scorpio does when Harry shoots him across the football field :))
    I feel I'm gonna start to sound like a broken record, but that's a great scene. Paraphrasing, and if I'm not misremembering, Don Siegel said the shot with the camera "flying" away from the stadium and the fog engulfing the characters was meant to symbolize how both Scorpio and Harry had crossed ethical boundaries, and thus were both "tainted." Scorpio for obvious reasons, and Harry because he tortured him to find out the girl's whereabouts. Dirty Harry is the best, the most provocative and the edgiest of the five films. It's a thought experiment. It takes all this talk about the criminal's rights and pushes it to the extreme by presenting us the most despicable villain they could portray and forcing us to consider the situation. It's also the most narratively single-minded of the films, brutally efficient in how almost every scene advances the story with basically no distractions, save for the few intended to flesh out Harry and address Chico's situation after being shot.

    Clints reserve is great in that stadium scene as he struggles against the blast of the helicopter filming it!
    The original and the best! Don Siegel was an excellent action director!
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    edited April 2018 Posts: 28,231
    The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011)
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    The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is one movie I try to get to every year around wintertime, simply because its atmosphere puts me more in the mood for the season than any Christmas comedies with their holiday hijinks could ever hope to. Considering the very dark and twisted subtext and imagery that come along with this film, that may say a bit too much about me and my own twisted nature. ;) I caught this film at the end of the season I usually choose it to transition into, so this watch of Dragon Tattoo did lose a special something for me simply because it was April and not January when I was watching it. That being said, my town still had a snowstorm going on outside at the time and so I thought it was fair game to view it since the weather hadn't changed from how it was during the Christmas season. I'm glad I jumped on it, as I don't think I could wait until next winter to see this, and I refuse to watch it in summer (just doesn't feel right).

    I've definitely seen this movie a lot, which can make some sections not as engaging to get through anymore, but I guess that's the same with a lot of films. The things that struck me when I first watched it, however, are extremely evergreen, and the scenes I originally found hard to watch (those who've seen it will know the major two) are those I still struggle with. David Fincher's mastery of mood and atmosphere which he imbues with a twisted edge are the real centerpiece here with some of the most haunting visuals made out of very normal locations. He can make a beautiful Swedish mansion outside town look like the devil's manor, and that speaks to his amazing talents as a visual storyteller. The disturbing and unconventional score of Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross is another treasure of the film, as the music does as much for the mood of the piece as the visuals; I've seldom seen a movie that uses its visuals and sounds in such perfect union, in fact. The score of this film reminds me of how Kubrick used sound in his movies, where you can pick up on a sort of white noise or skin crawling buzz or tone underlying a number of scenes that provides a distinct otherworldliness. A very simple effect, but very effective in making you uneasy that the characters are in immediate peril even if they may not be (at that moment).

    The other centerpiece of Dragon Tattoo outside its brilliant sound and visuals are definitely the performances which still make an impressive statement. Rooney Mara is a wonder here, and it's amazing just how effortlessly she slips into the character of Lisbeth. The movie does one of my favorite narrative tricks with Lisbeth where we're introduced to her character through the opinions other characters have of her before we every actually see her on screen. This instantly colors our impressions and expectations of the character leading up to her debut as we become shocked or vindicated in feeling what we do about her. I have personally always related to the antisocial loner Lisbeth is, and part of the fun in watching Mara is how well she nails the character's resentment for small talk and human interaction in general. Lisbeth is also so terrifying at times for such a small, svelte little woman, and that's a testament to Mara's performance and the places she can go to as an actress; her inherent innocence belies her resourcefulness and strength. She truly becomes Lisbeth here and, speaking as someone who has loved the books, she really feels true to the character I enjoyed reading about.

    A special mention must also be made of the costume and makeup departments of Dragon Tattoo for how they took a very beautiful woman in Mara and really crafted her into the gothic, asocial and bohemian woman we see here in Lisbeth, a very remarkable feat. I also really like the subtle ways that the film visually characterizes Lisbeth through her clothing, hair style and piercings. She is constantly changing her appearance, giving her a chameleon-like presence, but her appearance is also nicely used to show how she changes as a character as the narrative progresses. She starts the film in full piercings, a wild mohawk and clad in leather but as the film goes on and she and Daniel Craig's Blomkvist grow closer (and she becomes more accepted for who she is by him) she loses more and more of those piercings and the other style items she used to hide herself underneath. In that way, a sub-story of the film is about Lisbeth truly coming out of her shell and stripping away a lot of the defense mechanisms that she finds herself never having to use with Blomkvist because, for once, she doesn't feel judged, vulnerable to harm or cast aside. A nice touch that truly makes Lisbeth and Blomkvist feel like a strong and supportive team who compliment each other despite their vast differences as characters, much like Holmes and Watson before them in that grand mystery tradition.

    Speaking of Daniel Craig, he still impresses here. It's a testament to his talents that he can effortlessly scare the living hell out of me as James Bond but can then feel so meek, breakable and anxious here; he truly becomes a chameleon. He plays Mikael Blomkvist as he should be done, with an everyman mix of bemusement, self-deprecation and vulnerability as he becomes overwhelmed and gradually more in over his head due to the film's central case that he's been tasked to unmask. He truly feels raw and a shell of a man coming off a big journalistic faux pas at the start of the film, and Dan crafts a compelling character out of that human drama. He also shows off his knack for extremely dry humor, as he takes on the role of the straight man to a cast of characters who he often doesn't realize are making jokes. Always feeling ten steps behind the punchline, Dan often gives Blomkvist an endearing sort of innocence or naivete. That doesn't detract from the character's intellect, however, as Dan can also effectively fall into the troubled detective of such rich cinematic tradition. Like the greats before him taking on similar roles, Dan perfectly represents the exhaustion, anxiety and fear that the best film detectives express while being overwhelmed by their own cases. While I still find it a tad odd to hear Dan using a British accent while a lot of the cast are going for a more local, Swedish one, the kinds of things he brings to every performance still keep me glued to the screen no matter what. It's because of films like this that make me see him in anything, no matter the role or genre he's taking on.


    Dragon Tatto contains only minor issues for me, as I can easily fall into it and forget that the film is nearly three hours long. It really is a ride and you just hop on it as it takes you to ordinary locations that are given an extraordinary spookiness and inherent danger; basically, the Fincher standard. This movie fits in perfectly with Fincher's other twisted mysteries, including Se7en and Zodiac, where very troubled characters are taken down haunting and bizarre alleyways of terror to solve even more bizarre and haunting cases. One day I'll have to use a weekend to watch the "Fincher Twisted Mystery Trilogy" from Friday to Sunday, one for each night.

    In closing, I do think that Dragon Tattoo could be trimmed in places, as it can have some false starts and emphasize certain moments that aren't as important as others in the film itself. Some changes were made from the book that I actually think were improvements, but the focus of the film could have been more honed and instead of taking the narrative down certain alleys it would've perhaps been more effective to allocate that time to more relevant and pressing aspects of the story like the central case.

    Very little to complain about, really, and I would recommend this movie to the same sorts of people I recommended Shutter Island to: viewers who don't mind mysteries that emphasize character over said mystery in a film that presents very real and uncensored content that will make you uncomfortable because of how based in reality it is. As with Scorsese's work in that film, here Fincher uses the volatile content not to shock you raw, but instead to present the very real horrors of the world that man is capable of committing, another timeless theme of the detective genre that often shows how far humans can fall in their own desperation or selfishness. In The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo you will confront man and beast not as separate entities, but as one, with no holds barred. If that doesn't bug you, I invite you to take a train and join Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara on the grounds of that spooky manor.
  • Posts: 15,052
    As much as I like Fincher, I don't think his 2011 adaptation of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo comes close to Män som hatar kvinnor, with Michael Nyqvist and Noomi Rapace. All these foreign actors playing Swedes kind of takes me out of the movie.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 28,231
    I still need to see the original, @Torgeirtrap, but I completely get the criticism. What I think the original may struggle to have, in my eyes, however, is that Fincher touch that really fits in perfectly with the way the book is presented. That twisted, otherworldly mood.

    I forgot to mention another positive in my most recent impression of the film: it's one of the only remakes that I think actually makes the case for its existence. While far too many reboots or remakes are done for easy profit or to retain rights, this movie truly represents a team going for it to make the best project they can in the name of the art itself.
  • edited April 2018 Posts: 15,052
    I still need to see the original, @Torgeirtrap, but I completely get the criticism. What I think the original may struggle to have, in my eyes, however, is that Fincher touch that really fits in perfectly with the way the book is presented. That twisted, otherworldly mood.

    I forgot to mention another positive in my most recent impression of the film: it's one of the only remakes that I think actually makes the case for its existence. While far too many reboots or remakes are done for easy profit or to retain rights, this movie truly represents a team going for it to make the best project they can in the name of the art itself.

    @0BradyM0Bondfanatic7 Interesting you should pick on The Fincher touch. I want to add that it's been a while since I saw both adaptations, but the thing that made me feel the Swedish adaptation was better (other than the casting), is the focus on mood. I felt like the Fincher version was too "Fincher" for it's own good. More like Fincher taking on TGWTDT, rather than TGWTDT, directed by Fincher. The original had more of the Scandinavian crime procedural style (of course), that makes the story more as it should be, to me. You definitely should see the original. With the Swedish adaptation you also have the opportunity to watch the sequels.

    Need to read the novel again, too. Haven't read that in a long, long time.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 28,231
    @Torgeirtrap, the mood of the 2011 film can often be expansive, so the Swedish version may have a more even focus on mood and story. I simply mean that the Fincher version gives me the same feeling that the book does, so the visceral experience of all the ominous locations, the hidden danger and the anxiety of the thing really feel very faithful. I'll be interested to see how the performances stack up against the remake too, though I think it will be hard for me to see anyone but Mara as Lisbeth at this stage.
  • Mendes4LyfeMendes4Lyfe "I need a year off" Craig
    Posts: 7,263
    One common thread around all the Craig films that aren't connected to Bond, is that good or bad, they have never really stuck in the public consciousness. TGWTGT was well received upon release, but I rarely see it get mentioned much anymore. Same with Cowboys and Aliens, and likely will happen with Logan Lucky. Even Munich is probably bottom 3 least memorable Spielberg films.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 33,983
    One common thread around all the Craig films that aren't connected to Bond, is that good or bad, they have never really stuck in the public consciousness. TGWTGT was well received upon release, but I rarely see it get mentioned much anymore. Same with Cowboys and Aliens, and likely will happen with Logan Lucky. Even Munich is probably bottom 3 least memorable Spielberg films.

    Blasphemy. Go to your room.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 28,231
    Sadly, I think that's the case for most movies now that are worthy of plaudits. A lot of the most impressive films I've seen in "modern cinema" have been those that you probably won't see talked about that much, as they weren't trendy enough to become part of watercooler discussion. More movies will be forgotten or silently talked about than those that become pop culture darlings, and when the latter are films like Twilight or Fifty Shades of Grey you do wonder where our sense of great cinema went.
  • edited April 2018 Posts: 15,052
    @Torgeirtrap, the mood of the 2011 film can often be expansive, so the Swedish version may have a more even focus on mood and story. I simply mean that the Fincher version gives me the same feeling that the book does, so the visceral experience of all the ominous locations, the hidden danger and the anxiety of the thing really feel very faithful. I'll be interested to see how the performances stack up against the remake too, though I think it will be hard for me to see anyone but Mara as Lisbeth at this stage.

    I actually think Noomi Rapace's performance was better than Mara's. Rapace sold the character more for me. Same in the case of Michael Nyqvist as Mikael Blomkvist, compared to Craig. I think you'll find the Swedish adaptation to be just as good as the American one, and - depending on your own preference in tone, etc., maybe even better.

    In any case the Swedish adaptation is more a Scandinavian noir, like Bron/Broen (The Bridge), for example. Also, I may be mistaken, but I think I read somewhere that the English translations of the books were heavily edited?
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