FRWL briefcase knife

Hello, I work with a small manufacturing company that is thinking of doing a limited run of the attache case knife used in FRWL. These would be true to the movie knife and made out of steel not aluminum. Just wondering if there is any interest in these from the fan community or a waste of time and money...

Comments

  • Posts: 19,339
    I don't think that will be legal in the UK...its a dangerous weapon.
  • Posts: 4,325
    It is illegal to sell disguised knives in the UK - i.e. a blade or sharp point hidden in everyday objects - which is precisely what the FRWL briefcase is!
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Enemy of the state
    Posts: 41,566
    I remember when you could buy a springknife disguised as a haircomb practically anywhere.
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    Posts: 3,416
    I remember buying a Rambo knife by mail order as a teenager. The bloody thing was lethal! It had a compass and sewing kit in the handle!
  • DragonpolDragonpol The Crazy World of David Dragonpol
    edited March 2017 Posts: 14,723
    I remember when you could buy a springknife disguised as a haircomb practically anywhere.

    Well that's true.

    Agreed that the sale of such concealed knives and the carrying of such knives and other offensive weapons in a public place is illegal under UK law going back many years to at least the Prevention of Crime Act 1953, s. 1(1).

    Here is a list of the relevant statutes on knives in the UK:

    The Prevention of Crime Act 1953

    Prohibits the carrying of any offensive weapon in a public place without lawful authority or reasonable excuse. A public place includes private premises to which the public have access. An offensive weapon is defined as any article made or adapted for use for causing injury to the person, or intended by the person for such use. Maximum penalty: Six months imprisonment and/or £5000 fine.

    The Restriction of Offensive Weapons Act 1959

    Prohibited the manufacture, sale, hire or offer for sale or hire, and importation of flick knives and gravity knives. Maximum penalty: Six months imprisonment and/or £5000 fine.

    The Criminal Justice Act (CJA) 1988

    Created an offence of having an article with a blade or point in a public place without good reason or lawful excuse. An exemption applies to folding pocket knives with a blade of less that three inches. (In my view this is a nonsense…three inches ‘kills‘. This was proven to be the size of the knife that killed Westley). Maximum penalty: Up to two years imprisonment.

    CJA 1988 also prohibited the manufacture, sale, hire, offer for sale or hire of a range of weapons specified in the Criminal Justice Act (Offensive Weapons) Order 1988. These are mainly items designed to cause serious injury, for example knuckledusters, handclaws and certain Martial Arts equipment, or those which can be easily concealed, including swordsticks. Maximum penalty: Six months imprisonment and/or £5000 fine.

    Offensive Weapons Act 1996 - amended the 1988 Act

    To prohibit the sale of knives and certain articles with a blade or point to persons under the age of 16. Maximum penalty: Six months imprisonment and/or £5000 fine.

    Knives Act 1997

    Created offences relating to the unlawful marketing of knives as suitable for combat, or in ways likely to stimulate or encourage violent behaviour. It also extended the power to stop and search in anticipation of violence contained in the Criminal Justice & Public Order Act 1994. Maximum penalty: Six months imprisonment and/or £5000 fine. (It is interesting, this figure for a fine is the same as that imposed in 1953...£5000. In 1953 this would probably have bought 5 or 6 terraced houses on the outskirts of London).

    Section 60 of the Criminal Justice & Order Act 1994, as amended by the Knives Act 1997 - contains a power under which an Officer or Inspector rank or above could, in certain circumstances, authorise Police Officers within a given area to stop and search for offensive weapons.

    Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006

    Since the introduction of the Violent Crime Reduction Bill on the 9th June, 2005 further provisions and amendments were made in October, 2006 to raise the minimum age to buy a knife from 16 to 18. The maximum sentence for carrying a knife without good reason was also increased from 2 years to 4 years, along with giving Teachers more power to search pupils for weapons - Royal Assent of this Bill, November, 2006! And, there you have it…Legislation, and plenty of it! It’s a wonder anyone ever gets charged with an offence at all…Police are too busy trying to keep up with the Laws?

    Home Office records show that the number of people killed with a sharp instrument in 1994 was 231. In 2005 that number was a near identical 236 out of the total number of murders of 820. But this year reported knife incidents have taken a turn for the worse…the British Crime Survey suggests that the number of muggers using knives increased dramatically from 24,290 to 42,020 - a rise of 73%. There were 110 serious attacks between May and June this year, 23 fatalities during the 5 weeks of the Knife Amnesty.

    In total 3,511 people were convicted of carrying a knife or blade in the year 2000 compared with 5,784 in 2004! The number of children aged 12 to 14 convicted of carrying knives at school doubled between 2000 and 2004 to 170. The Youth Justice Board announced that carrying a ’bladed weapon’ was the most common offence among children excluded from school! In 2004 the British Crime Survey estimated that 60,000 children aged 11 to 16 were routinely carrying knives…it’s frightening to consider the implications of this growing trend.

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that those carrying knives claim ’they do so for protection’…deaths and serious injuries are often caused by their own weapon, that has been turned on them! In an attempt to reverse this trend a Nationwide Knife Amnesty was started on the 24th May which ended on the 30th June, 2006 and netted 90,000 bladed weapons…sadly however, the incidents are still on the increase. In Essex alone knife incidents run at something in the region of six or more, per week!

    Legal Aid, Sentencing & Punishment Act 2012

    New measures intended to reduce Knife Crime: www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-20577149


    Taken from: http://www.knifecrimes.org/experts-view.html



  • edited March 2017 Posts: 19,339
    I once brought a shortsword,mace and morning star through customs from Spain...didn't even get stopped or have to declare them !

    This is back in about 1983 though,if not earlier.

    Have we got a firearms and weapons thread re Bond on here at all ?
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    Posts: 3,416
    I think I've still got a 44' Magnum replica in the loft..... :-O
  • Posts: 19,339
    Come on,how many times did you do Dirty Harry impressions....admit it @LeonardPine
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    Posts: 3,416
    barryt007 wrote: »
    Come on,how many times did you do Dirty Harry impressions....admit it @LeonardPine

    "Did he fire six shots or only five...?!!!"

    Too many times mate!

    :))
  • I had no idea the UK was so controlling as far a knives go. Well it looks like we'll have to stick to the American market for this-
  • DragonpolDragonpol The Crazy World of David Dragonpol
    Posts: 14,723
    Specterman wrote: »
    I had no idea the UK was so controlling as far a knives go. Well it looks like we'll have to stick to the American market for this-

    Well guns go down well there anyway...

  • Posts: 19,339
    Specterman wrote: »
    I had no idea the UK was so controlling as far a knives go. Well it looks like we'll have to stick to the American market for this-

    Yep....we are,and rightly so ...good luck elsewhere though.

  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Enemy of the state
    Posts: 41,566
    Specterman wrote: »
    I had no idea the UK was so controlling as far a knives go. Well it looks like we'll have to stick

    Yeah, that is what knives do.
  • DragonpolDragonpol The Crazy World of David Dragonpol
    Posts: 14,723
    barryt007 wrote: »
    Specterman wrote: »
    I had no idea the UK was so controlling as far a knives go. Well it looks like we'll have to stick to the American market for this-

    Yep....we are,and rightly so ...good luck elsewhere though.

    Yes, knife crime is/was a major problem in the UK, hence all the legislation in place to protect the general public from those who carry knives.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Enemy of the state
    Posts: 41,566
    Maybe this is something for @QBranch.

    Or do you already have one?
  • I remember buying a Rambo knife by mail order as a teenager. The bloody thing was lethal! It had a compass and sewing kit in the handle!

    I had one of those as did all my mates when we went playing in the countryside as kids (How the world has changed) the sewing kit was useful to sew up any wounds we may get ;)) I had a few catapults and various other things we made lol
  • QBranchQBranch Always have an escape plan. Mine is watching James Bond films.
    edited November 2017 Posts: 11,516
    Maybe this is something for @QBranch.

    Or do you already have one?
    Sadly, I don't have any Bond knives. I don't have the tools to make one, and it would be too much a risk losing my $ trying to get a purchased one through customs to here in Australia. The DAF cork remover I bought a few years ago (that came with a nice storage case) didn't even get through customs ffs. That's how fussy they are.

    I've been casually following this project on ajb, and no word there either since April. I think the project is dead in the water TBH.
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 16,351
    Oh my, I have a bunch of knives- folding, fixed blade, one that's sort of a Rambo-like knife, Swiss Army knives, even a Samurai sword... most are for collector purposes and/or opening packages. Only time I ever have one out of my home is once a year while camping... in a fight I'd choose not to have one if I could- it becomes a focal point and limits you (in general, professionals can integrate).
  • chrisisall wrote: »
    Oh my, I have a bunch of knives- folding, fixed blade, one that's sort of a Rambo-like knife, Swiss Army knives, even a Samurai sword... most are for collector purposes and/or opening packages. Only time I ever have one out of my home is once a year while camping... in a fight I'd choose not to have one if I could- it becomes a focal point and limits you (in general, professionals can integrate).

    I just have some training nunchucks and a wooden Katana Bokken which stay in my gym, I have a decent Camillus titanium lock knife though everyone needs a good knife for odd jobs.
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    edited November 2017 Posts: 16,351
    I just have some training nunchucks and a wooden Katana Bokken which stay in my gym, I have a decent Camillus titanium lock knife though everyone needs a good knife for odd jobs.

    Yes, one of my folding knives I use for carving and other odd jobs. I also have a pair of nunchucks that I made myself, and a short tonfa. An a pair of bokken. No real guns though (I suppose that makes me unusual as an American... ;) ).
  • edited November 2017 Posts: 15,564
    chrisisall wrote: »
    I just have some training nunchucks and a wooden Katana Bokken which stay in my gym, I have a decent Camillus titanium lock knife though everyone needs a good knife for odd jobs.

    Yes, one of my folding knives I use for carving and other odd jobs. I also have a pair of nunchucks that I made myself, and a short tonfa. An a pair of bokken. No real guns though (I suppose that makes me unusual as an American... ;) ).

    I enjoy Katana training good for the shoulders, in my youth I lived in the country so made alot of things like weapons, as well as snares, tree houses and go carts lol back in the day computers were primitive so no mobile phones etc more of an idyllic childhood.
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 16,351
    I enjoy Katana training good for the shoulders, in my youth I lived in the country so made alot of things like weapons, as well as snares, tree houses and go carts lol back in the day computers were primitive so no mobile phones etc more of an idyllic childhood.
    Ahhh, sweet youth that had such weapons in it... ;)
  • these would sell well in the United States. Have you thought about introducing them to the American market? I'd certainly be a customer!
  • Posts: 19,339
    I've got a cheese knife,butter knife and a few steak knives,does that count ?
  • QBranchQBranch Always have an escape plan. Mine is watching James Bond films.
    Posts: 11,516
    No, that doesn't quite cut it. :D
  • Posts: 19,339
    QBranch wrote: »
    No, that doesn't quite cut it. :D

    Bugger.

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSn1VzhLd9WR9278iMN0553VnKqPaANZZvf1gBwndi-LWTSU6ilsg

  • DragonpolDragonpol The Crazy World of David Dragonpol
    edited November 2017 Posts: 14,723
    I see that radio silence has been maintained by Brother @Specterman. It's not looking good for this product at all in fact. I'd say it was doomed from its very inception.
  • QBranchQBranch Always have an escape plan. Mine is watching James Bond films.
    Posts: 11,516
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    I'd say it was doomed from its very inception.
    What gives you that impression, Draggers? There was certainly enough interest on the other forum to make a run, and at a good selling price. It would be nice however, if the OP checked in once in a while to keep members informed on progress or confirm the project has indeed been cancelled.
  • Posts: 1,031
    tanaka123 wrote: »
    It is illegal to sell disguised knives in the UK - i.e. a blade or sharp point hidden in everyday objects - which is precisely what the FRWL briefcase is!

    This.
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