Who should/could be a Bond actor?

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  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    I really was shocked to learn some of the folks they screen tested. Brolin, Gavin,....even Burt Reynolds was in contention at one time apparently.
  • AceHoleAceHole Belgium, via Britain
    Posts: 1,727
    Regarding Brolin, Reynolds etc. - EoN learned from those mistakes. They cast Dalton a few years later, who wasn't even first choice at the time...

    If the future '2nd choice' to replace Craig is anywhere near as good then we have nothing to worry about.
    Having said that, I feel DC has upped the bar considerably, in so far as what caliber of actor you need to be to be considered for the role. For the better.

  • suavejmfsuavejmf Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England
    Posts: 5,131
    I'd agree with that Acehole. Yes Bondjames, Reynolds was in the frame for LALD......mad really....an all american 007....pointless.
  • mcdonbbmcdonbb deep in the Heart of Texas
    Posts: 4,116
    I know it probably shouldn't matter if American as long as an exceptional actor could nail the accent. ...BUT I still prefer a British actor.

    Ditto for Indiana Jones ...just prefer American for this icon.

    These characters are treasured by their countries of origin ..think for national pride let's cast an actor from the character's country.
  • talos7talos7 New Orleans
    Posts: 8,080
    One American who I could have seen as Bond was Gregory Peck.
  • suavejmfsuavejmf Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England
    edited July 2015 Posts: 5,131
    mcdonbb wrote: »
    I know it probably shouldn't matter if American as long as an exceptional actor could nail the accent. ...BUT I still prefer a British actor.

    Ditto for Indiana Jones ...just prefer American for this icon.

    These characters are treasured by their countries of origin ..think for national pride let's cast an actor from the character's country.

    Problem is, no American actor can ever nail an English accent.

    Another reasonable suggestion for 007 was Liam Neeson. He was considered in the 90's by Kevin McClory I believe.
  • AceHoleAceHole Belgium, via Britain
    edited July 2015 Posts: 1,727
    But have the British actors really nailed the American accents for iconic heroes such as Batman and Supes? To my ear, not completely.
    Bale was excellent, but his accent was 90% perfect. Cavill perhaps 95% perfect. Yet, they did not sound truly ALL-american to me, as opposed to Michael Keaton or Chris Reeve in the same parts. Those guys just SOUNDED perfect for the parts, because they were über-American actors.

    As a Brit, I'd still prefer US actors for Bat/Superman, and a Brit for 007... call me old fashioned.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited July 2015 Posts: 23,883
    AceHole wrote: »
    As a Brit, I'd still prefer US actors for Bat/Superman, and a Brit for 007... call me old fashioned.

    I agree wholeheartedly, in principle.

    However, I think there are far more better UK actors for dramatic roles than US ones (I'm not sure why, but maybe the theatrical system/heritage in the UK produces more of them per capita) and so if push came to shove, I'd take a better British actor for an iconic American role over a bad American actor, although ideally I'd prefer a good American actor in the role.
  • AceHoleAceHole Belgium, via Britain
    Posts: 1,727
    bondjames wrote: »
    AceHole wrote: »
    As a Brit, I'd still prefer US actors for Bat/Superman, and a Brit for 007... call me old fashioned.

    I agree wholeheartedly, in principle.

    However, I think there are far more better UK actors for dramatic roles than US ones (I'm not sure why, but maybe the theatrical system/heritage in the UK produces more of them per capita) and so if push came to shove, I'd take a better British actor for an iconic American role over a bad American actor, although ideally I'd prefer a good American actor in the role.

    Hollywood is saturated with Brits and Aussies right now, so I guess the chances of one of them landing such a part is simply far bigger now than it would have been in the 70's/80's/90's ...
    Really, you cannot watch a mainstream movie these days without it featuring some young up-and-commer from Stoke on Trent or smth...
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited July 2015 Posts: 23,883
    AceHole wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    AceHole wrote: »
    As a Brit, I'd still prefer US actors for Bat/Superman, and a Brit for 007... call me old fashioned.

    I agree wholeheartedly, in principle.

    However, I think there are far more better UK actors for dramatic roles than US ones (I'm not sure why, but maybe the theatrical system/heritage in the UK produces more of them per capita) and so if push came to shove, I'd take a better British actor for an iconic American role over a bad American actor, although ideally I'd prefer a good American actor in the role.

    Hollywood is saturated with Brits and Aussies right now, so I guess the chances of one of them landing such a part is simply far bigger now than it would have been in the 70's/80's/90's ...
    Really, you cannot watch a mainstream movie these days without it featuring some young up-and-commer from Stoke on Trent or smth...

    I agree.

    What I think everyone is trying to avoid is another debacle/fiasco/tragedy like Hayden Christensen (and I realize he's Canadian).

    The Brits are normally up to the job. The Aussies not so much (eg. Worthington or that walking brick known as Courtney). Crowe has the goods though, as does Blanchett.
  • Posts: 725
    I think the Connery beating up on women points may not be accurate. He made an incredibly stupid comment on an old Barbara Walters special about slapping a women. Others on the site who have read more about the issue correct me, but apart from this comment, don't remember ever reading about Connery beating up his wife.
  • JuraquagmireJuraquagmire Canada
    Posts: 41
    I would like have Michael Fassbender or Guy Pearce or Jude Law for next Bond after Daniel Craig. Also, I want Idris Elba in James Bond movie as other 00 agent along with one of these actors.
  • doubleoegodoubleoego #LightWork
    Posts: 11,139
    Jude Law? Hell no.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited July 2015 Posts: 23,883
    Jude played Bond (light) already this year......in SPY. He's not the man for the job.
  • DaltonCraig007DaltonCraig007 They say, "Evil prevails when good men fail to act." What they ought to say is, "Evil prevails."
    Posts: 15,696
    jude-law-emilia-clarke-dom-hemingway-trailer-stills-02.jpg
  • edited July 2015 Posts: 2,081
    AceHole wrote: »
    But have the British actors really nailed the American accents for iconic heroes such as Batman and Supes? To my ear, not completely.
    Bale was excellent, but his accent was 90% perfect. Cavill perhaps 95% perfect. Yet, they did not sound truly ALL-american to me, as opposed to Michael Keaton or Chris Reeve in the same parts. Those guys just SOUNDED perfect for the parts, because they were über-American actors.

    As a Brit, I'd still prefer US actors for Bat/Superman, and a Brit for 007... call me old fashioned.

    As a non-native speaker I wouldn't notice if an accent wasn't 100%, but I'm not sure how much I'd care anyway. Either not that much... or maybe my mindset concerning accents would be different if I had grown-up in an environment where accents are considered important and I would care...
    bondjames wrote: »
    However, I think there are far more better UK actors for dramatic roles than US ones (I'm not sure why, but maybe the theatrical system/heritage in the UK produces more of them per capita)

    I've also wondered why that is. I don't really know the theatrical system and all that, but some actors come from outside of it as well.
    bondjames wrote: »
    What I think everyone is trying to avoid is another debacle/fiasco/tragedy like Hayden Christensen (and I realize he's Canadian).

    The Brits are normally up to the job. The Aussies not so much (eg. Worthington or that walking brick known as Courtney). Crowe has the goods though, as does Blanchett.

    I'm only familiar with Hayden Christensen's name, and some vague negative association people refer to, but I don't think I've ever actually seen him anything... at least not that I remember, so could you very briefly say what the fiasco was?

    As for the Aussies, c'mon... no need to give them a bad name just because Worthington and Courtney are, well, maybe not very versatile or exciting to watch. ;) A lot of great actors from that part of the world. Crowe and Blanchett are indeed fantastic. Ledger was. Guy Pearce, Joel Edgerton. Hugh Jackman isn't bad. And so on.
    doubleoego wrote: »
    Jude Law? Hell no.

    I agree. Too old as well (42, and 43 later this year).
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited July 2015 Posts: 23,883
    Tuulia wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    However, I think there are far more better UK actors for dramatic roles than US ones (I'm not sure why, but maybe the theatrical system/heritage in the UK produces more of them per capita)

    I've also wondered why that is. I don't really know the theatrical system and all that, but some actors come from outside of it as well.
    I think it's just a culture of stage/theatre combined with the fact that enunciation, elocution etc. is still important in England (although far less so than before). Additionally, American movies/films are well known to Brits (from a young age) due to the power of American film/tv culture.....probably more so than the other way round....so maybe they can more easily slip into the accent out of pure familiarity. Also, the British accent requires a little more work in enunciation, which is more difficult to go to from American English than the other way round (where one is going to a more 'casual' accent). I'm of course speculating.
    Tuulia wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    What I think everyone is trying to avoid is another debacle/fiasco/tragedy like Hayden Christensen (and I realize he's Canadian).

    The Brits are normally up to the job. The Aussies not so much (eg. Worthington or that walking brick known as Courtney). Crowe has the goods though, as does Blanchett.

    I'm only familiar with Hayden Christensen's name, and some vague negative association people refer to, but I don't think I've ever actually seen him anything... at least not that I remember, so could you very briefly say what the fiasco was?
    The tragedy in question was Anakin Skywalker in the Star Wars prequels (in the 2nd and 3rd films).
  • JuraquagmireJuraquagmire Canada
    edited July 2015 Posts: 41
    I believe Jude Law can pull it off after saw 'Dom Hemingway', He could be gritty Bond.
    bondjames wrote: »
    Jude played Bond (light) already this year......in SPY. He's not the man for the job.
    Well, I never seem 'SPY' nor plan to.
    Tuulia wrote: »
    doubleoego wrote: »
    Jude Law? Hell no.
    I agree. Too old as well (42, and 43 later this year).
    Guy older than Jude, and yet nobody complaint about that...


  • DaltonCraig007DaltonCraig007 They say, "Evil prevails when good men fail to act." What they ought to say is, "Evil prevails."
    edited July 2015 Posts: 15,696
    Craig will be Bond for quite possibly 6 more years . Add to that another 3 to prepare the next Bond, Jude Law will be around 52 years old when he'll get his chance as Bond. So, it won't happen.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    I believe Jude Law can pull it off after saw 'Dom Hemingway', He could be gritty Bond.
    bondjames wrote: »
    Jude played Bond (light) already this year......in SPY. He's not the man for the job.
    Well, I never seem 'SPY' nor plan to.
    Here's a brief indication of Jude in Bondian gear/mode (spoof though).

  • edited July 2015 Posts: 2,081
    bondjames wrote: »
    Tuulia wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    However, I think there are far more better UK actors for dramatic roles than US ones (I'm not sure why, but maybe the theatrical system/heritage in the UK produces more of them per capita)

    I've also wondered why that is. I don't really know the theatrical system and all that, but some actors come from outside of it as well.
    I think it's just a culture of stage/theatre combined with the fact that enunciation, elocution etc. is still important in England (although far less so than before). Additionally, American movies/films are well known to Brits (from a young age) due to the power of American film/tv culture.....probably more so than the other way round....so maybe they can more easily slip into the accent out of pure familiarity. Also, the British accent requires a little more work in enunciation, which is more difficult to go to from American English than the other way round (where one is going to a more 'casual' accent). I'm of course speculating.

    Hmm. Interesting, even if speculation.

    You earlier comment was about "dramatic roles" and now only about accent and stuff - was that what you meant before as well, not the rest of acting?
    bondjames wrote: »
    Tuulia wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    What I think everyone is trying to avoid is another debacle/fiasco/tragedy like Hayden Christensen (and I realize he's Canadian).

    The Brits are normally up to the job. The Aussies not so much (eg. Worthington or that walking brick known as Courtney). Crowe has the goods though, as does Blanchett.

    I'm only familiar with Hayden Christensen's name, and some vague negative association people refer to, but I don't think I've ever actually seen him anything... at least not that I remember, so could you very briefly say what the fiasco was?
    The tragedy in question was Anakin Skywalker in the Star Wars prequels (in the 2nd and 3rd films).

    I kinda assumed that might have been the role you were referring to, but what was the tragedy bit there in relation to this convo? I mean did it have something to do with his accent or about him not being American?

    And I should probably clarify that my comment about Australian actors was about their acting in general (which I interpreted was your comment about those couple of guys as well), not specifically about accent stuff.

  • Posts: 6,601
    Even at the right age, Jude Law certainly doesnt have edge. He is more Moore, but nothing can beat Sir Roger in what he is best at.
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited July 2015 Posts: 23,883
    Tuulia wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    Tuulia wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    However, I think there are far more better UK actors for dramatic roles than US ones (I'm not sure why, but maybe the theatrical system/heritage in the UK produces more of them per capita)

    I've also wondered why that is. I don't really know the theatrical system and all that, but some actors come from outside of it as well.
    I think it's just a culture of stage/theatre combined with the fact that enunciation, elocution etc. is still important in England (although far less so than before). Additionally, American movies/films are well known to Brits (from a young age) due to the power of American film/tv culture.....probably more so than the other way round....so maybe they can more easily slip into the accent out of pure familiarity. Also, the British accent requires a little more work in enunciation, which is more difficult to go to from American English than the other way round (where one is going to a more 'casual' accent). I'm of course speculating.

    Hmm. Interesting, even if speculation.

    You earlier comment was about "dramatic roles" and now only about accent and stuff - was that what you meant before as well, not the rest of acting?
    I mean both. Accents (which the Brits tend to do better going to the American rather than vice versa) and the acting chops (which I'm surprised by given the size vs. the US but I think there is more of a 'dramatic' performance culture in the UK.....I felt it when I was growing up there..........Also I think it may be on account of the Hollywood/American system that seems to me to prioritize looks these days over most other things, including capabilities).
    Tuulia wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    Tuulia wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    What I think everyone is trying to avoid is another debacle/fiasco/tragedy like Hayden Christensen (and I realize he's Canadian).

    The Brits are normally up to the job. The Aussies not so much (eg. Worthington or that walking brick known as Courtney). Crowe has the goods though, as does Blanchett.

    I'm only familiar with Hayden Christensen's name, and some vague negative association people refer to, but I don't think I've ever actually seen him anything... at least not that I remember, so could you very briefly say what the fiasco was?
    The tragedy in question was Anakin Skywalker in the Star Wars prequels (in the 2nd and 3rd films).

    I kinda assumed that might have been the role you were referring to, but what was the tragedy bit there in relation to this convo? I mean did it have something to do with his accent or about him not being American?

    The tragedy was the horrendous (imho) dramatic acting. Terrible is not the word. I brought it up because he was a 'non-Brit' cast in an important dramatic role in a major franchise and he was a total bust (and North American, if not American). Compared to the similarly British and Aussie cast in the LTR trilogy that came out around the same time, the difference is clear. A small example of this:


    Tuulia wrote: »
    And I should probably clarify that my comment about Australian actors was about their acting in general (which I interpreted was your comment about those couple of guys as well), not specifically about accent stuff.
    No, I was referring to Aussies as being a mixed bag compared to Brits. I used Courtney and Worthington because they are overrated and overexposed in relation to their expertise, imho. Sure, there are good Australian actors as well, as you named.
  • Posts: 2,081
    @bondjames, gotcha, thanks. I agree. And that clip you posted is awful. I've never had any plans to watch the movie and I sure don't feel more inclined to watch it now.
  • edited July 2015 Posts: 725
    Bond requires a huge amount of promotion interviews everywhere. I just don't think they will in the next few recasts efforts risk an American in a Bond. A few can successfully mimic the British accent OK, but there will be a serious dislocation for listeners when they do all of their Bond promotion when they are using their regular American accent. It won't work. And re Law, please no. Good actor, but he's too old, too short, and too sleazy.
  • dominicgreenedominicgreene The Eternal QOS Defender
    Posts: 1,756
    bondjames wrote: »
    Tuulia wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    Tuulia wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    However, I think there are far more better UK actors for dramatic roles than US ones (I'm not sure why, but maybe the theatrical system/heritage in the UK produces more of them per capita)

    I've also wondered why that is. I don't really know the theatrical system and all that, but some actors come from outside of it as well.
    I think it's just a culture of stage/theatre combined with the fact that enunciation, elocution etc. is still important in England (although far less so than before). Additionally, American movies/films are well known to Brits (from a young age) due to the power of American film/tv culture.....probably more so than the other way round....so maybe they can more easily slip into the accent out of pure familiarity. Also, the British accent requires a little more work in enunciation, which is more difficult to go to from American English than the other way round (where one is going to a more 'casual' accent). I'm of course speculating.

    Hmm. Interesting, even if speculation.

    You earlier comment was about "dramatic roles" and now only about accent and stuff - was that what you meant before as well, not the rest of acting?
    I mean both. Accents (which the Brits tend to do better going to the American rather than vice versa) and the acting chops (which I'm surprised by given the size vs. the US but I think there is more of a 'dramatic' performance culture in the UK.....I felt it when I was growing up there..........Also I think it may be on account of the Hollywood/American system that seems to me to prioritize looks these days over most other things, including capabilities).
    Tuulia wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    Tuulia wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    What I think everyone is trying to avoid is another debacle/fiasco/tragedy like Hayden Christensen (and I realize he's Canadian).

    The Brits are normally up to the job. The Aussies not so much (eg. Worthington or that walking brick known as Courtney). Crowe has the goods though, as does Blanchett.

    I'm only familiar with Hayden Christensen's name, and some vague negative association people refer to, but I don't think I've ever actually seen him anything... at least not that I remember, so could you very briefly say what the fiasco was?
    The tragedy in question was Anakin Skywalker in the Star Wars prequels (in the 2nd and 3rd films).

    I kinda assumed that might have been the role you were referring to, but what was the tragedy bit there in relation to this convo? I mean did it have something to do with his accent or about him not being American?

    The tragedy was the horrendous (imho) dramatic acting. Terrible is not the word. I brought it up because he was a 'non-Brit' cast in an important dramatic role in a major franchise and he was a total bust (and North American, if not American). Compared to the similarly British and Aussie cast in the LTR trilogy that came out around the same time, the difference is clear. A small example of this:


    Tuulia wrote: »
    And I should probably clarify that my comment about Australian actors was about their acting in general (which I interpreted was your comment about those couple of guys as well), not specifically about accent stuff.
    No, I was referring to Aussies as being a mixed bag compared to Brits. I used Courtney and Worthington because they are overrated and overexposed in relation to their expertise, imho. Sure, there are good Australian actors as well, as you named.

    To be fair, you can't really blame the kid. Luca's writing is complete garbage.
  • Posts: 725
    smitty wrote: »
    Bond requires a huge amount of promotion interviews everywhere. I just don't think they will in the next few recast efforts risk an American as a Bond. A few good American actors can successfully mimic the British accent OK, but there will be a serious dislocation for listeners when they do all of their Bond interviews on TV and video and they are using their regular American accent. It won't work. And re Law, please no. Good actor, but he's too old, too short, and too sleazy.

  • SirHilaryBraySirHilaryBray Scotland
    Posts: 2,138
    The launch and popularity of BBC and ITV America has a lot to do with the "British Invasion" of actors in LA and NYC. The Americans love British dramas like Downton, Poldark etc. Similar thing happened in the 60 ' s most Holywood leading men were Brits. They love the accents.
  • AceHoleAceHole Belgium, via Britain
    Posts: 1,727
    bondjames wrote: »
    Tuulia wrote: »
    bondjames wrote: »
    However, I think there are far more better UK actors for dramatic roles than US ones (I'm not sure why, but maybe the theatrical system/heritage in the UK produces more of them per capita)

    I've also wondered why that is. I don't really know the theatrical system and all that, but some actors come from outside of it as well.
    I think it's just a culture of stage/theatre combined with the fact that enunciation, elocution etc. is still important in England (although far less so than before). Additionally, American movies/films are well known to Brits (from a young age) due to the power of American film/tv culture.....probably more so than the other way round....so maybe they can more easily slip into the accent out of pure familiarity. Also, the British accent requires a little more work in enunciation, which is more difficult to go to from American English than the other way round (where one is going to a more 'casual' accent). I'm of course speculating.

    There you have it. Great explanation =D>
  • Lancaster007Lancaster007 Shrublands Health Clinic, England
    Posts: 1,874
    AceHole wrote: »
    But have the British actors really nailed the American accents for iconic heroes such as Batman and Supes? To my ear, not completely.
    Bale was excellent, but his accent was 90% perfect. Cavill perhaps 95% perfect. Yet, they did not sound truly ALL-american to me, as opposed to Michael Keaton or Chris Reeve in the same parts. Those guys just SOUNDED perfect for the parts, because they were über-American actors.

    As a Brit, I'd still prefer US actors for Bat/Superman, and a Brit for 007... call me old fashioned.

    Why does Superman have to sound American? He's from Krypton, surely he could be any nationality.
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