Your Ultimate Bond Timeline

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  • Posts: 4,731
    This Bond timeline literally goes by time, that is, Bond's age! Obviously it starts off with Lazenby, the youngest, and will end with Moore, the oldest.

    1. On Her Majesty's Secret Service (30)
    2. Dr. No (32)
    3. From Russia with Love (33)
    4. Goldfinger (34)
    5. Thunderball (35)
    6. You Only Live Twice (37)
    7. Casino Royale (38)
    8. Quantum of Solace (40)
    9. Diamonds Are Forever (41)
    10. GoldenEye (42)
    11. The Living Daylights (43)
    12. Tomorrow Never Dies (44)
    13. SkyFall (44)
    14. License to Kill (45)
    15. Live and Let Die (45)
    16. The World is not Enough (46)
    17. The Man with the Golden Gun (46)
    18. Die Another Day (49)
    19. The Spy Who Loved Me (49)
    20. Moonraker (51)
    21. Never Say Never Again (51)
    22. For Your Eyes Only (53)
    23. Octopussy (55)
    24. A View to a Kill (57)
  • Posts: 1,817
    @00Beast I'll like to make a Bondathon in that order! (Leaving #21 outside as it doesn't exist for me.)
  • Samuel001Samuel001 Moderator
    edited February 2013 Posts: 13,309
    The Living Daylights should come after Quantum of Solace, License to Kill should come after GoldenEye as Dalton was born in 1946 and Skyfall should be before Tomorrow Never Dies.

    I too may do this next time to switch the order up. It will make for a refreshing change.

    It seems as the actor's age, the series becomes more tired.
  • edited February 2013 Posts: 12,505
    Samuel001 wrote:
    [as Dalton was born in 1946

    Or was it 44? One of the great mysteries of life that. Either way he still looks great for his age.

    I'd say he's probably aged the best out of all the Bond actors. Maybe Craig will beat him at that when he gets older but I think he's aged a fair bit over the last few years.
  • Posts: 4,731
    0013 wrote:
    @00Beast I'll like to make a Bondathon in that order! (Leaving #21 outside as it doesn't exist for me.)

    I agree, it is so unofficial that it should not be included, but I felt compelled to leave it in, since a major theme of the movie is, in fact, Bond's age.
  • edited February 2013 Posts: 115
    Samuel001 wrote:
    [as Dalton was born in 1946

    Or was it 44? One of the great mysteries of life that. Either way he still looks great for his age.

    Dalton stated in a press conference for Living Daylights that he was 41. Maybe the comment he made about being 24/25 when he first auditioned for Bond whilst he was interviewed during the premiere of TLD film was on the quick and he didn't have time to go into Total Recall...Unlike Douglas Quaid.
  • Posts: 96
    What if the films were done in order of the books?

    Sean Connery:
    1962 - Casino Royale
    1963 - Live and Let Die
    1964 - Moonraker
    1965 - Diamonds Are Forever
    1967 - From Russia with Love

    George Lazenby:
    1969 - Dr No

    Sean Connery (returns):
    1971 - Goldfinger

    Roger Moore:
    1973 - Thunderball
    1974 - The Spy Who Loved Me
    1977 - On Her Majesty's Secret Service
    1979 - You Only Live Twice
    1981 - The Man with the Golden Gun
    1983 - Octopussy
    1985 - The Living Daylights

    Timothy Dalton:
    1987 - From A View To A Kill
    1989 - Quantum of Solace

    Pierce Brosnan:
    1995: For Your Eyes Only
    1997 - The Hildebrand Rarity
    1999 - Risico
    2002 - The Property of a Lady

    Daniel Craig:
    2008 - Licence Renewed
    2012 - For Special Services
    2014 - Icebreaker
  • edited June 2013 Posts: 2,244
    Sean Connery (1962 - 1965):

    Live and Let Die (1962)
    Moonraker (1963)
    Diamonds Are Forever (1964)
    From Russia, With Love (1965)

    Starting Age: 32
    Ending Age: 35

    Films: FOUR

    George Lazenby (1967 - 1979):

    Dr. No (1967)
    Goldfinger (1968)
    For Your Eyes Only (1969)
    Thunderball (1971)
    The Spy Who Loved Me (1973)
    On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1975)
    You Only Live Twice (1976)
    The Man With The Golden Gun (1979)

    Starting Age: 28
    Ending Age: 40

    Films: EIGHT

    Timothy Dalton (1982 - 2002):

    Octopussy (1982)
    A View To A Kill (1984)
    The Living Daylights (1987)
    Licence To Kill (1989)
    Property Of A Lady (1991)
    Risico (1993)
    GoldenEye (1995)
    Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)
    The World Is Not Enough (2000)
    Die Another Day (2002)

    Starting Age: 36 - 38
    Ending Age: 56 - 58

    Films: TEN

    Daniel Craig (2006 - 2018):

    Casino Royale (2006)
    Quantum Of Solace (2008)
    Skyfall (2012)
    Bond 26 (2015)
    Bond 27 (2018)

    Starting Age: 38
    Ending Age: 50

    Films: FIVE
  • Posts: 562
    Great timeline there, @StirredNotShaken! Wish it could've been like that.
  • Posts: 2,244
    Should I edit mine to include explanations? I'm not sure.
  • edited July 2013 Posts: 6
    1962 - Dr. No

    1963 - From Russia with Love

    1964 - Goldfinger

    1965 - Thunderball

    Here's where the timeline diverges. During pre-production on Bond 5, the producers ultimately decide to wait on You Only Live Twice. They still want to go for one last slam-bang adventure before they pursue the more emotional side of Bond with On Her Majesty's Secret Service, but chose to save the latest Bond novel for Majesty's follow-up.

    Bond 5 comes down to either Moonraker or Diamonds are Forever. Because of the novel's locations, Diamonds are Forever is chosen to follow Thunberball. The story centers around a SPECTRE plot involving diamond smuggling and the world economy. Blofeld's face is once again hidden. Anthony Dawson returns to lend his hands. The villains are SPECTRE numbers 3 and 4. The film is a major success, grossing more than Goldfinger, but it fails to outgross Thunderball. Connery isn't hounded during the Vegas shoots and states in interviews that he enjoyed his time on set. He will be back for the last film in his contract.

    1966 - Diamonds are Forever

    The next Bond film takes two years before its release. Pre-production in Switzerland proves to be time consuming. Connery doesn't mind this as it allows him to take some time to pursue other projects. Peter Hunt is given the directors chair. With Connery in the role, the casting is less focused on compensating for the lead. Despite this, the role of Blofeld still goes to Telly Savalas.

    On Her Majesty's Secret Service is a massive critical success, and proves to be a great box office success as well. It grosses more than the previous film, but still fails to match Thunderball. Connery is quite pleased with the character-driven and emotional aspects to the film. The producers meet with him to discuss the future. Connery expresses that he feels his duty has been fulfilled, but also expresses interest in where the role of Bond will go from here. He agrees to sign back on for one more film at a salary of $900,000.

    1968 - On Her Majesty's Secret Service

    Things immediately get off to a nasty start when the production crew arrives in Japan. Connery is hounded from day one, and grows increasingly more agitated with each passing day.

    During pre-production, unable to find a seaside castle, the set designers were forced to resort to building a mock castle on location. Interior shooting is scheduled back in Pinewood. This escalates the budget immensely, creating friction with the producers and United Artists.

    You Only Live Twice is another success, although it grosses less than On Her Majesty's Secret Service. Critical reception is mostly positive, although many agree that Connery's performance isn't quite up to speed with his performance in Majesty's. Connery himself states that You Only Live Twice will be his last, and refuses to return, despite being offered two million dollars to return.

    1970 - You Only live Twice

    The studio, while understanding that Bond is their goldmine, but adamant that the production be tighter, agrees to provide a budget of 8 million dollars for the next film. The producers realize that they need an established actor to replace Connery, someone who won't fail to draw in the crowds. It is soon announced that Roger Moore will replace Sean Connery in the eight Bond film. Fan reaction is generally positive. Already a beloved actor from his work in The Saint, Moore has no difficulty winning audiences over.

    Despite a different date, the film is essentially the same as the one in our timeline, although the slightly higher budget allowed for better special effects. There's no exploding balloon villain at the end.

    1972 - Live and Let Die

    A two year gap after Live and Let Die allows for a better script. Everything about the film is better overall and it produces far more at the box office.

    1974 - Live and Let Die

    1977 - The Spy Who Loved Me

    1979 - Moonraker

    1981 - For Your Eyes Only

    1983 - Octopussy

    Despite Cubby's request that he returns for a seventh, Moore departs from the role after Octopussy. Cubby quickly casts Timothy Dalton as the third 007.

    1985 - A View to a Kill

    1987 - The Living Daylights

    1989 - Licence to Kill

    With three films under his belt, Dalton's performance is perfectly polished by Licence to Kill. Despite the film's violence and departure from the traditional formula, audiences have warmed to him. A six year hiatus follows. Despite his contract being fulfilled, Dalton resigns for one more.

    1995 - Goldeneye

    Following Goldeneye's release, Dalton signs on for another film. Like Moore, Dalton keeps the contracts for one film at a time.

    1997 - Tomorrow Never Dies

    1999 - The World is Not Enough

    2002 - Die Another Day

    These three films are far more edgier and grounded than Bronsnan's versions. Dalton is light on the puns and heavy on the action and emotion. While outlandish, Die Another Day is far less ridiculous than our counterpart. It proves to be a rather decent film and a quality finale for Dalton, the longest serving Bond.

    Daniel Craig is cast and the series is rebooted.

    2006 - Casino Royale.

    The producers hold off on Bond 22's production while the writers' strike is in effect. It's far more well-received by critics and fans alike than our version

    2009 - Quantum of Solace

    2012 - Skyfall

    2014 - The Hildebrand Rarity

    2016 - Colonel Sun

    Michael Fassbender is cast as the fifth 007.

    2018 - ?
  • Posts: 2,244
    L0ucks wrote:
    1985 - A View to a Kill

    1987 - The Living Daylights

    1989 - Licence to Kill

    With three films under his belt, Dalton's performance is perfectly polished by Licence to Kill. Despite the film's violence and departure from the traditional formula, audiences have warmed to him. A six year hiatus follows. Despite his contract being fulfilled, Dalton resigns for one more.

    1995 - Goldeneye

    Following Goldeneye's release, Dalton signs on for another film. Like Moore, Dalton keeps the contracts for one film at a time.

    1997 - Tomorrow Never Dies

    1999 - The World is Not Enough

    2002 - Die Another Day

    These three films are far more edgier and grounded than Bronsnan's versions. Dalton is light on the puns and heavy on the action and emotion. While outlandish, Die Another Day is far less ridiculous than our counterpart. It proves to be a rather decent film and a quality finale for Dalton, the longest serving Bond.

    Daniel Craig is cast and the series is rebooted.

    2006 - Casino Royale.

    That's pretty much what I aimed to achieve with my Dalton timeline. Especially in regards to TND, where Carey Lowell would be Pam instead of Hatcher as Paris. Carey's never been one of my favourite Bond girl actresses, but it'd be a nice nod to LTK and would have actual emotional impact on the viewers. That, and Dalton had the looks to go onto TWINE and DAD, and would've done much better with that material than Brosnan did.
  • Posts: 140
    Thought I'd chime in on this alternate-reality exercise. I'd just rearrange a few things and fill in the gaps:

    Sean Connery:
    1. Dr. No (1962)
    2. From Russia With Love (1963)
    3. Goldfinger (1964)
    4. Thunderball (1965)
    5. On Her Majety's Secret Service (1967)
    6. You Only Live Twice (1969) (a faithful adaptation)

    Roger Moore:
    7. The Man With the Golden Gun (1971) (a somewhat more faithful adaptation)
    8. Live and Let Die (1973)
    9. Diamonds Are Forever (1975)
    10. The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)
    11. Moonraker (1979)
    12. For Your Eyes Only (1981)
    13. Octopussy (1983)

    Timothy Dalton:
    14. A View to a Kill (1985) (with a brief appearance by Gary Busey as Felix Leiter)
    15. The Living Daylights (1987) (Busey returns as Leiter)
    16. Licence to Kill (1989) (concluding the Busey-as-Leiter Trilogy)
    17. The Property of a Lady(1993)
    18. GoldenEye (1995)

    Pierce Brosnan:
    19. Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)
    20. The World Is Not Enough (1999)
    21. Die Another Day (2001)
    22. Everything or Nothing (2003)

    Daniel Craig:
    23. Casino Royale (2006)
    24. Quantum of Solace (2008)
    25. Risico (2010)
    26. Skyfall (2012)

    Notes:
    -- I've rearranged the late Connerys and early Moores to enable Sean to do the Blofeld Trilogy properly. Unfortunately, this means eliminating poor old George entirely.

    -- OP really was the proper Swan Song for Rog, for a variety of reasons. Also, starting Tim with AVTAK would have allowed him to get into the role before the whole "Brosnan was born to play Bond" bandwagon had gained much momentum.

    --I've always felt that LTK would have had more impact if Leiter had been more familiar to audiences at the time. To that effect, I have him appearing in Dalton's first three films, played by the same actor each time. I chose Busey because he vaguely resembles Fleming's descriptions of Leiter.

    -- By the end of the 1980s, many people had come to take Bond for granted. A hiatus in the early '90s was probably necessary in order to help regenerate public interest in the franchise. All I've done is reduce it to 4 years instead of 6, and brought back Dalton afterward.

    -- Not being much of a gamer, I find it regrettable that "Everything or Nothing" was not used as the title of a movie. It actually makes a really catchy title.
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 16,645
    Nice. =D>
  • pachazopachazo Make Your Choice
    Posts: 7,218
    Gary Busey as Felix Leiter? Sign me up please.
  • Posts: 6

    Sean Connery
    1. 1962 Dr. No
    2. 1963 From Russia with Love
    3. 1964 Goldfinger
    4. 1965 Thunderball (Based on novel)
    5. 1967 On Her Majesty's Secret Service (Based on novel)
    6. 1969 You Only Live Twice (Based on novel)
    7. 1971 Diamonds Are Forever(Based on novel)

    Roger Moore
    8. 1973 Live and Let Die
    9. 1974 The Man with the Golden Gun
    10. 1977 The Spy Who Loved Me
    11. 1979 Moonraker
    12. 1981 For Your Eyes Only
    13. 1983 Octopussy
    14. 1985 A View to a Kill

    Timothy Dalton
    15. 1987 The Living Daylights Timothy Dalton
    16. 1989 License to Kill
    17. 1991 Risco (Based on Bond 17 Script)

    Pierce Brosnan
    18. 1993 Blood Stone (Based on For Special Services from John Gardner)
    19. 1995 GoldenEye
    20. 1997 Tomorrow Never Dies
    21. 1999 The World Is Not Enough
    22. 2002 Die Another Day
    23. 2004 Everything Or Nothing (Based on the game)

    Daniel Craig
    24. 2006 Casino Royale
    25. 2008 Quantum of Solace
    26. 2012 Skyfall
    27. 2015 The Property Of A Lady
    28. 2017 The Hildebrand Rarity
  • Posts: 1,908
    I cant buy Gary Busey being any type of good guy/ally not only in a bond film but in any film lol. I defintly see Busey being a crazy henchman of some sorts
  • Posts: 6,396
    fjdinardo wrote:
    I cant buy Gary Busey being any type of good guy/ally not only in a bond film but in any film lol. I defintly see Busey being a crazy henchman of some sorts

    He's actually really good as Keanu Reeves' FBI partner in Point Break. Proved he can play a good guy as well as a villain.
  • fjdinardo wrote:
    I cant buy Gary Busey being any type of good guy/ally not only in a bond film but in any film lol. I defintly see Busey being a crazy henchman of some sorts

    He's actually really good as Keanu Reeves' FBI partner in Point Break. Proved he can play a good guy as well as a villain.

    The only good thing about that film.
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 16,645
    A fellow at ABJ intrigued me with a possible timeline concerning YOLT straight to DAF, and here I extrapolate:
    DN
    FRWL
    GF
    TB
    YOLT
    DAF
    LALD
    TMWTGG
    OHMSS
    TLD
    LTK
    GE
    TND
    TWINE
    TSWLM
    FYEO
    OP
    AVTAK

    MR was removed from this timeline as per my opinion.;)

    Thoughts, ladies & gentlemen?
  • Posts: 1,908
    chrisisall wrote:
    A fellow at ABJ intrigued me with a possible timeline concerning YOLT straight to DAF, and here I extrapolate:
    DN
    FRWL
    GF
    TB
    YOLT
    DAF
    LALD
    TMWTGG
    OHMSS
    TLD
    LTK
    GE
    TND
    TWINE
    TSWLM
    FYEO
    OP
    AVTAK

    MR was removed from this timeline as per my opinion.;)

    Thoughts, ladies & gentlemen?

    I dont like it cause MR was one of the best films IMO
  • edited July 2014 Posts: 2,244
    My new, in-depth timeline, more or less unchanged from the last one, but this time there's DETAILS! *cue Kermit the Frog wail*

    EDIT: This has been taking me literally months to type, so I'm going to post it in stages. Otherwise this would without a doubt be the longest post on the site ever. I wish I had just done it like this so @SirHenry would've been able to read at least this section. Here's the first part of my (insanely detailed) timeline.

    Before Bond

    In 1953, Ian Fleming debuts Casino Royale. No TV production is made in 1954, certainly not one starring an American. Fleming decides to hold off on allowing a film series to be made until he has a substantial back catalogue of novels. The books are produced in the same order and are unchanged. Kevin McClory recieves the proper credit on the Thunderball novel, preventing any legal battles in future.

    In 1960, Fleming decides it's time to go ahead with making a Bond film. Harry Saltzman and Cubby acquire the necessary rights and licences. Pre-production begins just as the Thunderball novel is about to premiere in 1961.

    The first decision that must be made is which book to film. Fleming wants Casino Royale, but the forward-thinking Cubby knows that the world - and the censors - aren't ready for a true adaptation. They go with the second book, instead: Live and Let Die.

    Casting begins. The villainous Kananga is chosen to be portrayed by an up-and-coming thirty-something named Sidney Poitier, who made waves a couple years prior by being the first black actor to be nominated for an Oscar. Gregory Peck is cast as Felix, a decision agreed upon by Fleming who wants the CIA agent to appear older and more experienced than Bond on screen. Peck signs a contract for any films that feature the character made up until his 50th birthday. As production later moves along, Peck and the producers agree that, as the films should follow the books, Peck will only be able to appear again once, in Diamonds are Forever, before he turns fifty. The contract is revised to specifically two films as a result. Jane Fonda auditions for Solitaire, off the shoulders of only two small roles and her father's fame, and manages to blow the producers away unexpectedly. She is cast. Bernard Lee and even Fleming himself are both offered the role of M, however Fleming's health becomes shaky during this period of time and he declines. The role is to go to Lee, but when the role is reduced to a single scene, Fleming is again approached and decides to accept the role. Lois Maxwell is still cast as Moneypenny. The Bond theme is used as the film's main theme and is composed, along with the score, by John Barry.

    The most important person, Bond himself, is cast last. After several rejected offers towards Cary Grant, David Niven, and several other actors, a then-unknown Sean Connery is aporoached after being remembered from the 1958 film Another Time, Another Place. Connery is reluctant to commit to a series of films but, tempted by the lucrative pay grade, agrees.

    Connery is coached into the role by director Terence Young, and once the team is satisfied with Connery's look and demeanour, filming begins and ends in the beginning of 1962.

    Sean Connery (1962 - 1965; 3 years, 4 films; age 32 through 35)

    1: Live and Let Die (1962)

    The film is a straight adaptation of the novel, however minor liberties are taken with the beginning plot in order to allow a similar introduction to the character of Bond as can be seen in Dr. No. One major plot point is changed; Felix is not mauled by the shark. Instead, Bond rescues him from Kananga's barracuda. Also, Felix escapes the warehouse by subduing Kanaga's guard rather than being released due to a mutual love of jazz; it is the jazz connection that instead allows Felix to distract the guard. The guard is fed to the shark by Kananga rather than Felix, a punishment for allowing his escape.

    The film is in black and white, save for the blood in the gunbarrel and the stylish title sequence, similar to the one featured in the real Dr. No. This is a stylistic decision insisted upon by Ian Fleming. This trend continues for the Connery films. Also a mainstay for Connery's tenure is director Terence Young, who will direct all four of his films.

    Connery is brilliant. Fleming plays an extremely convincing M, albeit for a single scene. Fonda as Solitaire is beloved and Poitier's role as Kananga recieves incredible acclaim. Gregory Peck as Felix even recieves some recoginition. Live and Let Die is a smash success, ensuring at least another film. Connery, originally on a two-film deal, agrees to extend his contract to four.

    The follow-up to Live and Let Die is a true moment of tension for the producers; with the smash success of the first film, the realization comes that they will indeed need to make a series of Bond films. They know they need this film to be bigger and better in order to satisfy fans and get the necessary box office returns. Pre-production begins only weeks after the premiere of Live and Let Die. As they are following the novels, Moonraker is automatically chosen to be the second film.

    Casting happens quickly. Connery and Fleming are back in their roles. Alec Guinness is cast in only a couple of weeks, the only actor considered for the role of Hugo Drax. Dawn Addams, virtually unknown at the time, is spotted from her stunning looks and, after a screen test, is offered the role of Gala Brand. Deciding to add in the Quartermaster role, the producers cast Desmond Llewelyn, who has a brief scene giving Bond his basic equipment. By the new year, a script has been finished and the film has been cast. Filming begins and ends during the first quarter of 1963, and the film is released in March; two months ahead of when FRWL was released in the real world. This earlier release will, down the road, create a silver lining in regards to the deaths of Fleming and, later, Lee when it comes to the role of M. John Barry again returns to compose the score - he will do all of Connery's tenure and a majority of the movies up until Dalton's tenure - and a big name artist is chosen to helm a licenced theme song: Shirley Bassey, with Moonraker's theme done similar to the real life Goldfinger.

    2: Moonraker (1963)

    Like LALD, the film is a direct lift of the novel, with the only changes being to accomodate a similar structure to the previous film; all of the plot itself remains the same. M is given a couple more scenes here, similar to how he is used in 1979's Moonraker, checking in on Bond as he investigates Drax. At the end of the film, Gala still reveals her engagement to a British soldier, though unlike the novel's ending, she agrees to spend one night with Bond in exchange for his saving her life.

    Moonraker is an even bigger success than LALD at the box office, recouping its budget in two weeks and perpetuating that success for the remainder of its' run. Like its' predecessor, all elements of the film are praised, in particular Connery, who is universally considered to have given an even better performance as Bond, and Alec Guinness as Drax.

    With two successful films on their hands, the producers know they have a franchise on their hands. The first Bond merchandise is sold, netting further profits for the series. Moonraker is part of the conversation for the Oscars during 1963, but when the nominees are announced near the end of the year, Moonraker is not among them.

    Despite the Oscars snub, the next film, Diamonds Are Forever, is approached with as much enthusiasm and optimism as Moonraker was, if not more so. Pre-production does not begin until the summer of 1963, several months after Moonraker's release. The biggest budget yet is allotted to DAF, giving the producers carte blanche for casting the film. Connery, Fleming, Maxwell, Llewelyn and Peck all return for this film. Marlon Brando is cast as Jack Spang, who is written as an amalgamation of Jack and Serrafino when the producers are unable to find a suitable candidate to play the second brother. A very young Jill St. John, just that year awarded a Golden Globe, is the first choice for Tiffany Case. Deciding that they want two strong actors who at the same time will appeal to female audiences, Paul Newman and Rock Hudson are cast as Wint and Kidd, only once the green light has been lit to include the gay hitmen, a very controversial thing in the 1960's.

    The script is written to be more extravagant and over the top, similar to how the real 1964 Bond film (Goldfinger) was written. It is still relatively grounded in reality, however many more liberties are taken with the plot to accomodate the script, and to this point, even though DAF follows the novel's main plot, it is also the most removed film of the three from its' source material. The theme song for Diamonds are Forever is done, fittingly, by Frank Sinatra.

    3: Diamonds Are Forever (1964)

    An outlandish lift of the novel, with gadgets, more action, and a generally more over the top feel than the novel or, indeed, the two Bond films that preceded it. The DB5 is introduced in this film. An example of the use of gadgets is Bond using a pellet gun installed in his watch to shoot a switch to derail Spang's train. Bond does not shoot Spang like in the novel, and since the character is an amalgamation, he survives the train crash to face Bond in the finale.

    Bond's dispatch of Wint and Kidd is extremely violent and gritty for 1964 and almost results in action from the censors. However, after a long-fought battle the sequence is unedited. It features Bond in a brutal fist-to-fist fight with Wint, during which Kidd is shot by the gun the two fight over. Bond manages to get the upper hand, and at point-blank range shoots Wint through the chest, before making the scene appear to be a murder-suicide as in the novel.

    In the ending, Bond disrupts the diamond smuggling operation and Spang murders his associates to try and cover his tracks, as in the novel. Bond uses a projectile launcher in the DB5 to shoot down Spang's chopper as he flies away. In the denouement, the film ends with Bond and Tiffany Case sinking down in the back of the DB5, out of the camera's view, with an "Oh, James..." closing the film in a fade to black.

    Diamonds premieres in May of 1964. It is much more critically successful than the 1971 version we got in real life, however it is deemed inferior to the previous two films, with a fun factor being found in the more outlandish action, but also a longing for the grounded escapism of the earlier movies. Nonetheless, Connery is still considered golden as Bond, and the supporting cast are all more than well-liked.

    Pre-production begins in the latter days of July for From Russia, with Love, hotly anticipated ever since Kennedy's explicitly stated love for the novel two years earlier. Connery announces to the public his intent to not renew his contract, and therefore make the film his last as Bond; similarly, Fleming confides privately to the producers that, for health reasons, he does not wish to reprise the role of M once his scenes have been filmed for FRWL. He also asks that his scenes are filmed early.

    While the film is being cast, around midday August 11th, Connery, Fleming and Maxwell are called to do the film's MI6 scenes. Connery and Fleming's interactions are much more tender, Fleming's failing health making him seem weaker and much less resilient than the M seen in the past three films. At the close of the MI6 scene, Fleming improvises a line to Connery to signify the affection M feels for his best agent; "Come back alive, 007; that's an order. Her Majesty's government needs you." The reaction shot shows Connery solemnly nodding, before giving his boss a warm smile and saying "I promise I won't disappoint." before closing the door behind him. It's a beautiful bit of interplay between Connery and Fleming, who was initially very doubtful about casting the Scot but warmed up to him quickly. It's also a nod to Fleming's initial doubts about Connery coupled with Connery's portrayal subsequently blowing him away. Connery and Fleming speak after filming, with Connery praising Fleming's work in the scene and telling him that it's been an honor to work with him. Fleming says the same before going back to his hotel for the night.

    By the morning of August 12th, Ian Fleming has passed away. The film is thrown into chaos by this, however with the blessing of Fleming's family, the production continues after a few weeks of uncertainty. The cast is the same as the 1963 version of FRWL: Lotte Lenya, Robert Shaw, Daniela Bianchi and Walter Gotell reprise their roles. The only different cast member, of course, is the man playing Darko Kerim, as Pedro Armendariz has passed away by this point in time. Initially unable to find a suitable candidate for the role, Young enlists at the last minute the beloved Donald Pleasance who is able to fake the accent and mannerisms needed. Added, however, is the character of Mathis, played by Jean-Paul Belmondo. Once everything has been sorted out, filming begins at the beginning of 1965 and goes almost until April. In an - at the time - unorthodox choice, Nat King Cole helms the theme song for FRWL, which is otherwise identical to the version in the 1963 film. From Russia, with Love is released on Christmas day, 1965.

    4: From Russia, with Love (1965)

    The film is nearly identical to the 1963 version, though the bigger budget and longer filming schedule allow for a much more polished movie. Gone are any of the poor back projection shots, and all of the action is bigger. Instead of the PTS with the Bond impostor being killed by Grant, the PTS begins on a black screen: LALD and Moonraker are referenced in the opening lines, just before the fade-in, after the gunbarrel: "We must get revenge for Kananga and Drax." When the fade in happens, the scene is revealed to be a SPECTRE meeting. They are discussing the future murder of an MI6 agent, whose name is not at first revealed. However, as the meeting goes on, the details revealed about this agent seem remarkably familiar. A dossier is passed around, eventually finding its' way in front of Rosa Klebb. She examines the dossier, which, when finally seen by the audience, is revealed to show a picture and relevant information of agent 007, James Bond. Cue theme music.

    The post-titles show the same sequence of events, including the introductions of Tatiana and Red Grant, and similar to the novel and original film, we do not see James Bond for quite some time. The movie proceeds as usual, though minor details from the novel are more closely followed (for example, Grant shoots Bond on the train, who is saved by his metal cigarette case). The boat chase and helicopter chase are taken out, and instead Bond and Tatiana arrive in Paris, where Klebb arrives and attempts to kill Bond. Mathis, who shows up sporadically in the film to assist Bond, captures Klebb with the French police, however Bond is kicked by Klebb's poisoned shoe, and collapses as Mathis and Tatiana rush to his aid. Bond loses consciousness as the film ends, leaving his fate ambiguous, similar to how the fate of the series is ambiguous without Sean Connery after this film.

    The film ends with a dedication to Ian Fleming over a still shot of him behind the desk as M as the credits roll.

    From Russia, with Love is universally acclaimed as the best Bond film yet, and indeed, one of the best films ever made almost immediately upon release. Everything works for the critics, especially Connery, whose sendoff is viewed as existentially perfect. The film makes millions, and is the highest grossing of 1965. This is largely owed to the anticipation surrounding Connery's last Bond film. Fans are not disappointed with the film at all, however they do desperately want Connery back. EON have to make an official statement that this won't happen, and that, for now at least, the Bond series is finished and there are no intentions of continuing it.

    le fin (for now).

    So... how's it looking so far?
  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe Still waiting for the Jena Malone Batwoman movie that's never going to be made.Moderator
    Posts: 12,089
    You've put a lot of thought into that @StirredNotShaken, and it's still only the Connery era. It puts my own timeline, which is currently under revision, and includes titles, year of release and a cast list (for some of the films) to shame.
  • Posts: 2,244
    Thank you, MD. Lazenby is up next, I hope to have him done soon.
  • MrBondMrBond Station S
    Posts: 2,044
    That was really well-written and entertaining to read! I'm looking forward to see what you have for us in the upcoming parts of your alternative timeline!
  • royale65royale65 Caustic misanthrope reporting for duty.
    Posts: 4,386
    Superbly done @StirredNotShaken! I hope you continue this thread... hint, hint...
  • I second that.

    My opinion has changed over the years, but as for this moment my ultimate timeline would go like.....

    Dr. No- Sean Connery
    From Russia with Love- Sean Connery
    Goldfinger- Sean Connery
    Thunderball- Sean Connery
    You Only Live Twice- Sean Connery
    On Her Majesty's Secret Service-George Lazenby
    Diamonds are Forever-George Lazenby
    Live and Let Die-Roger Moore
    The Man with the Golden Gun-Roger Moore
    The Spy who Loved Me-Roger Moore
    Moonraker-Roger Moore
    For Your Eyes Only-Roger Moore
    Octopussy-Roger Moore
    A View to a Kill- Timothy Dalton
    The Living Daylights- Timothy Dalton
    Licence to Kill- Timothy Dalton
    Untitled Dalton movie in 1991, 1992 or 1993
    GoldenEye- Timothy Dalton
    Tomorrow Never Dies- Pierce Brosnan
    The World is Not Enough- Pierce Brosnan
    Die Another Day- Pierce Brosnan
    Untitled Brosnan finale in 2004 or 2005- Pierce Brosnan
    Casino Royale- Daniel Craig
    Quantum of Solace (instead released in 2009, more complete)- Daniel Craig
    Skyfall- Daniel Craig
    Untitled Craig movie in 2014
    Untitled Craig finale in 2016
  • WalecsWalecs On Her Majesty's Secret Service
    Posts: 3,157
    I wish @Birdleson ran EON between '62 and now. The Bond series would have been a thousand times better.
  • Posts: 1,908
    My updated timeline. I really would have loved the Bond series to go like this

    Sean Connery 1962-1971 7 Movies
    Dr. No (1962)
    From Russia With Love (1963)
    Goldfinger (1964)
    Thunderball (1965)
    On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1967)
    You Only Live Twice (1969)
    Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

    Roger Moore 1973-1985 7 Movies
    Keep all 7 of his films the same. Wouldn't change anything about them

    Timothy Dalton 1987-1992 3 Movies
    The Living Daylights (1987)
    Licence to Kill (1989)
    Ice Breaker (1992)

    Pierce Brosnan 1995-2004 5 Movies
    Keep his first 3 films the same wouldn't change anything about them.
    Agent Under Fire (2002)
    Everything or Nothing (2004)

    Daniel Craig (2006-2017) 6 Movies
    Casino Royale (2006)
    Quantum Of Solace (2008)
    High Time To Kill (2010)
    SkyFall (2012)
    Spectre (2015)
    Bond 25 (2017)
  • LicencedToKilt69007LicencedToKilt69007 Belgium, Wallonia
    Posts: 523
    My first Bond timelines :

    -1st

    Sir Sean Connery (8 films)

    Casino Royale (1961)
    Dr No (1962)
    From Russia With Love (1963)
    Goldfinger (1964)
    Thunderball (1965)
    You Only Lice Twice (1967- with a better perf)
    OHMSS (1969)
    Diamonds Are Forever (1971-with more serious and revenge tone à la QoS)

    Sir Roger Moore (4 films) (with 1977 look)

    Live And Let Die (1973)
    The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)
    For Your Eyes Only (1981)
    Octopussy (1983)

    Timothy Dalton (4 films)

    A View To A Kill (1985)
    The Living Daylights (1987)
    Licence To Kill (1989)
    The Man With The Golden Gun (1992-less silly and updated)

    Pierce Brosnan (6 films)

    GoldenEye (1995)
    Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)
    The World Is Not Enough (1999)
    Die Another Day (2002-not exagerated, with a better plot,script)
    Moonraker (2007- as a modern film fitting current's CGI standards)
    Skyfall (2012)

    Michael Fassbender (with appropriated look, 2 films)

    Spectre (2015)
    next film




    -2nd ; quite different

    Connery (7 films)

    Dr No (1962)
    From Russia With Love (1963)
    Goldfinger (1964)
    Thunderball (1965)
    You Only Live Twice (1967)
    OHMSS (1969)
    Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

    Moore (5 films)

    Live And Let Die (1973)
    The Man With The Golden Gun (1974)
    The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)
    For Your Eyes Only (1981)
    Octopussy (1983)

    Dalton (4 films)

    A View To A Kill (1985)
    The Living Dayligths (1987)
    Licence To Kill (1989)
    Casino Royale (1992)

    Brosnan (3 films)

    GoldenEye (1995)
    Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)
    The World Is Not Enough (1999)


    Fassbender (5 films)

    Die Another Day (2007)
    Moonraker (2009)
    Skyfall (2012)
    Spectre (2015)
    next film





    -3rd,

    Connery (7 films)

    first seven films in order

    Moore (5 films)

    just like in the 2nd timeline

    Dalton (3 films)

    A View To A Kill (1985)
    The Living Daylights (1987)
    Licence To Kill (1989)

    Brosnan (5 films)

    Casino Royale (1992)
    GoldenEye (1995)
    Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)
    The World Is Not Enough (1999)
    Die Another Day (2002)

    Fassbender (4 films)

    Moonraker (2007)
    Skyfall (2012)
    Spectre (2015)
    next film


    So there are no George Lazenby and Daniel Craig in my timelines, no QoS and NSNA.

    My favourites Bonds are Brosnan, Connery and Dalton. I like to think each could have performed very well in CR. That's why there are 3 timelines. Other choices like no Moonraker and no TMWTGG for Moore are better fitting later in the timeline, IMHO. Skyfall could be a perfect end for Brosnan -considering Dench as M-. Fassbender as the current 007.
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