Last Movie you Watched?

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  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e il momento che verrà
    Posts: 6,158
    LE PROFESSIONNEL (1981)

    Fantastic French action spy thriller with Jean-Paul Belmondo, graced with a magnificent Ennio Morricone score.
    Highly recommended.



    @mattjoes ;)

    That all being said, I found it quite depressing that I am subscribed to no less than three (!) streaming services and I couldn't find this European classic anywhere.

    Sometimes I'm rather concerned how difficult it is to find classic European cinema and quite frankly I'm scared that so many Eurogems will disappear from our public memory.

    Our cultural choices have become increasingly one-sided. So for those of you who love European cinema as much as I do, please consider warming up your peers to those great Italian/German/French/Slavic/Scandinavian/(...) classics.

    Long live those subtitles ;)
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,289
    Fantastic 4 with Jessica Alba. It was better than I remembered. They changed Doom considerably from the comics, but I didn't mind.
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy My Secret Lair
    Posts: 13,384
    When Worlds Collide (1951)
    The Daddy of disaster movies, the effects still look good today. Although it is a
    Product of its time. A bit dated obviously but I loved this since first seeing it many
    years ago when BBC 2 would show a season of classic sci-fi movies.
  • Posts: 5,863
    GoldenGun wrote: »
    LE PROFESSIONNEL (1981)

    Fantastic French action spy thriller with Jean-Paul Belmondo, graced with a magnificent Ennio Morricone score.
    Highly recommended.



    @mattjoes ;)

    That all being said, I found it quite depressing that I am subscribed to no less than three (!) streaming services and I couldn't find this European classic anywhere.

    Sometimes I'm rather concerned how difficult it is to find classic European cinema and quite frankly I'm scared that so many Eurogems will disappear from our public memory.

    Our cultural choices have become increasingly one-sided. So for those of you who love European cinema as much as I do, please consider warming up your peers to those great Italian/German/French/Slavic/Scandinavian/(...) classics.

    Long live those subtitles ;)

    Where I'm from, there is a store that sells DVDs of vintage European and US films. It has existed for 40 years. I remember they used to sell out of a kiosk in a shopping mall, among other places. At one point I thought they had gone broke, but later I was pleasantly surprised to find out they are still in business, only as an online store. My parents bought plenty of films in that store, French and Italian for the most part. Mastroianni, Loren, Delon, Belmondo...
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e il momento che verrà
    edited September 2021 Posts: 6,158
    mattjoes wrote: »
    GoldenGun wrote: »
    LE PROFESSIONNEL (1981)

    Fantastic French action spy thriller with Jean-Paul Belmondo, graced with a magnificent Ennio Morricone score.
    Highly recommended.



    @mattjoes ;)

    That all being said, I found it quite depressing that I am subscribed to no less than three (!) streaming services and I couldn't find this European classic anywhere.

    Sometimes I'm rather concerned how difficult it is to find classic European cinema and quite frankly I'm scared that so many Eurogems will disappear from our public memory.

    Our cultural choices have become increasingly one-sided. So for those of you who love European cinema as much as I do, please consider warming up your peers to those great Italian/German/French/Slavic/Scandinavian/(...) classics.

    Long live those subtitles ;)

    Where I'm from, there is a store that sells DVDs of vintage European and US films. It has existed for 40 years. I remember they used to sell out of a kiosk in a shopping mall, among other places. At one point I thought they had gone broke, but later I was pleasantly surprised to find out they are still in business, only as an online store. My parents bought plenty of films in that store, French and Italian for the most part. Mastroianni, Loren, Delon, Belmondo...

    Great to hear that you were introduced to so much fabulous cinema when you were younger :)

    I hope I can pass on such things too in the future (together with my Bond fandom of course ;) )

    As far as the sixties are concerned I have also seen more Italian and French films than anything else. My favourite directors from the era are Michelangelo Antonioni and Luchino Visconti, and my favourite actors Alain Delon and Monica Vitti.

    On a sidenote I’d like to add that there was also great stuff coming from Czechoslovakia at that time. If you’re interested I’d recommend Closely Watched Trains, The Cremator and Marketa Lazarová.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 38,268
    @GoldenGun, I've been meaning to see Marketa Lazarova in full for years. I've heard great things but always worried it would have me incredibly lost or confused.
  • Posts: 5,501
    SHAFT IN AFRICA (1973)
    Have seen the first two movies, but have never actually seen this one until now!
    Richard Roundtrees supercool private eye John Shaft heads to Africa to break up a slavery ring, led by Frank Finlay! Helmed by John (The Blue Max) Guillermin, and part filmed in Ethiopia , its not up to the standard of the first two, but its still an enjoyable thriller with some neat action in the finale and a good score by Johnny Pate! Shafts Big Score still remains by favourite though!
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy My Secret Lair
    Posts: 13,384
    Patriot Games 1992.
    When CIA analyst Jack Ryan interferes with an IRA assassination, a renegade faction targets him and his family for revenge. An oldie but a goodie, excellent cast and yet another film in which poor old Sean Bean dies, and only three years later Pierce would
    be killing him too ;)
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e il momento che verrà
    edited September 2021 Posts: 6,158
    Creasy47 wrote: »
    @GoldenGun, I've been meaning to see Marketa Lazarova in full for years. I've heard great things but always worried it would have me incredibly lost or confused.

    It takes some getting used to its style, but it’s definitely worth it. Beautiful landscapes, gorgeous black-and-white cinematography, a magnificent score and a captivating story, both thematically as well as narratively.

    Having said that, it’s easier to start with Closely Watched Trains or The Cremator.

    Edit: if you decide to give any of these films a go, please share your thoughts on them, I’d love to know if you liked it :)
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 38,268
    GoldenGun wrote: »
    Creasy47 wrote: »
    @GoldenGun, I've been meaning to see Marketa Lazarova in full for years. I've heard great things but always worried it would have me incredibly lost or confused.

    It takes some getting used to its style, but it’s definitely worth it. Beautiful landscapes, gorgeous black-and-white cinematography, a magnificent score and a captivating story, both thematically as well as narratively.

    Having said that, it’s easier to start with Closely Watched Trains or The Cremator.

    Edit: if you decide to give any of these films a go, please share your thoughts on them, I’d love to know if you liked it :)

    Excellent, thanks, I'll be sure to.
  • edited September 2021 Posts: 5,863
    GoldenGun wrote: »
    mattjoes wrote: »
    GoldenGun wrote: »
    LE PROFESSIONNEL (1981)

    Fantastic French action spy thriller with Jean-Paul Belmondo, graced with a magnificent Ennio Morricone score.
    Highly recommended.



    @mattjoes ;)

    That all being said, I found it quite depressing that I am subscribed to no less than three (!) streaming services and I couldn't find this European classic anywhere.

    Sometimes I'm rather concerned how difficult it is to find classic European cinema and quite frankly I'm scared that so many Eurogems will disappear from our public memory.

    Our cultural choices have become increasingly one-sided. So for those of you who love European cinema as much as I do, please consider warming up your peers to those great Italian/German/French/Slavic/Scandinavian/(...) classics.

    Long live those subtitles ;)

    Where I'm from, there is a store that sells DVDs of vintage European and US films. It has existed for 40 years. I remember they used to sell out of a kiosk in a shopping mall, among other places. At one point I thought they had gone broke, but later I was pleasantly surprised to find out they are still in business, only as an online store. My parents bought plenty of films in that store, French and Italian for the most part. Mastroianni, Loren, Delon, Belmondo...

    Great to hear that you were introduced to so much fabulous cinema when you were younger :)

    I hope I can pass on such things too in the future (together with my Bond fandom of course ;) )

    As far as the sixties are concerned I have also seen more Italian and French films than anything else. My favourite directors from the era are Michelangelo Antonioni and Luchino Visconti, and my favourite actors Alain Delon and Monica Vitti.

    On a sidenote I’d like to add that there was also great stuff coming from Czechoslovakia at that time. If you’re interested I’d recommend Closely Watched Trains, The Cremator and Marketa Lazarová.

    In all fairness, I didn't pay too much attention to those films when I was a kid, but I suppose they seeped into my brain one way or another, as I now find myself more interested in them. The other day I watched a couple of Delon films after Le marginal-- Parole de flic and Ne reveillez un flic qui dort. Solid fun. And as we talked before, I've got Visconti's L'innocente to watch. I can also think of several others that are on my radar.

    Speaking of Le professionnel, they were playing Chi Mai on Belmondo's funeral. Delon was there. Jean Dujardin, too. It was quite emotional.

    I'll make a note on those Czech films!
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e il momento che verrà
    edited September 2021 Posts: 6,158
    I’ll take note on those Delon films, haven’t seen those. Thanks!

    I saw Macron’s speech on Belmondo a few days ago. He said there was something of Belmondo in every Frenchman. Or something along those lines. Quite right in any case, Belmondo was a showman for every kind of cinemagoer. Few actors were so successful both in experimental art as well as in entertaining pulp.

    On another note, “Chi Mai” is one of Ennio Morricone’s very best cues and that’s saying a lot.

    Sorry that I keep on rambling about these films. I can talk hours about Belmondo, Delon, etc. I’ll stop for now ;)
  • Posts: 5,863
    No worries, it's a very interesting subject.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper By the powers *in*vested in me by this parish, I hereby do commandeer this message board
    Posts: 7,183
    I just did something very unusual for me. I turned off a movie after about half an hour, because another hour and 15 minutes was still due...and I sort of hated it. Not because of (the lack of) any production values, not because of the direction, not because actors (Jack Nicholson, Adam Sandler, John Turturro), not even because I felt the jokes were shallow. But because in spite of all that I identified with the protagonist so much that I felt no enjoyment seeing him getting into further unjustified trouble and being bullied and under control of Nicholson's character. It was actually making me physically uncomfortable. I just felt the rest of the movie wouldn't make up for that. I just hated the way the story developed.

    We're talking about Anger Management (2003).

    I had bought the Blu-ray disk ages ago (in June 2010, to be exact), had sort of postponed it eternally and decided tonight I'd finally give it a try while my wife was in an extended phone call anyway. Wrong choice. I'll now go back sitting across from her on the sofa and listening (or not really) to her conversation instead.
  • edited September 2021 Posts: 12,436
    WW84: Gal Gadot!!!! :x Nuff said really!! :))

    Shang Chi and the 10 rings.
    Great fun, getting the feeling he may pop up in Dr Strange 2?
  • Fire_and_Ice_ReturnsFire_and_Ice_Returns The Bright Side of the Road.
    edited September 2021 Posts: 19,462
    One of the greatest films of all times...

    Raiders of the Lost Ark
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,289
    An obscure 2011 film called Priest.
    Holy crap was this GREAT. Paul Bettany, Maggie Q, & Karl Urban-??? It doesn't get much better than this for contemporary CGI-heavy movies....
  • Posts: 14,806
    One of the greatest films of all times...

    Raiders of the Lost Ark

    I need to upgrade. Currently I only have a VHS copy of this masterpiece. :(
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,077
    Settling in for a night of Fritz Lang Film Noirs staring Gloria Grahame and Glenn Ford: “The Big Heat” (1953) and “Human Desire” (1954). The later, is going to co-hosted by actress Dana Delaney on Turner Classic Movies. (I wonder if Ms. Delaney ever considered as a Bond Girl in the 1980s/1990s?).

    As for the last movie watched: not really a movie, but the documentary: “Film-Noir: Bring Darkness to Light” (2006?). While it is included as an extra on the “Gun Crazy” (1950) blu-ray I see someone has posted it to YouTube recently.

  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,487
    TWIN PEAKS-FIRE WALK WITH ME (D. Lynch, 1992)
    as part of my Twinpeaksathon.
    a0bfe466216b69402129c5f052aa6336--twin-peaks-diner.jpg

  • edited September 2021 Posts: 3,333
    Last movie I watched was Cry Macho. Anything starring the living legend that is Clint Eastwood is great, need you ask?
    banner_img.jpg
  • Posts: 5,501
    bondsum wrote: »
    Last movie I watched was Cry Macho. Anything starring the living legend that is Clint Eastwood is great, need you ask?
    banner_img.jpg

    Saw the trailer for it! Is it any good?
    I believe this was a project long in gestation, but Clint wanted to wait until he was the right age!!!!
  • Posts: 3,333
    Mathis1 wrote: »
    bondsum wrote: »
    Last movie I watched was Cry Macho. Anything starring the living legend that is Clint Eastwood is great, need you ask?
    banner_img.jpg

    Saw the trailer for it! Is it any good?
    I believe this was a project long in gestation, but Clint wanted to wait until he was the right age!!!!
    Tis very good, considering the lead actor is 91 years of age. Incredible when you actually stop and think about it. Eastwood gives a typically laid-back and laconic performance with retorts and quips that recall his much younger self. The story is A to B, but it's Eastwood that makes the whole thing tick along nicely. I enjoyed it.
  • Posts: 5,863
    Pour la peau d'un flic



    That's how you shoot a car chase!
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper By the powers *in*vested in me by this parish, I hereby do commandeer this message board
    edited September 2021 Posts: 7,183
    Last night: Triple Cross (1966).
    71Uzfq40eLL._SL1200_.jpg
    Terence Young directed a cast of several Bond alumni (Gert Fröbe, Claudine Auger, Anthony Dawson)...and of course, Christopher Plummer as the protagonist and other great actors (Romy Schneider, Yul Brynner, Trevor Howard...as well as Harry Meyen, Romy's husband (or husband-to-be) at the time, who tragically committed suicide 13 years later. IMDb Trivia states that Terence Young actually wanted Ursula Andress opposite Plummer, but I'm not sure if that was instead of Claudine or of Romy.

    The movie is about real-life safecracker Eddie Chapman, who after getting caught on the island of Jersey offers to spy for the occupying force, i.e. the Nazis, before then going back to Britain to become a double agent, and then back again...motivation: money.

    The movie is not perfect. Basically a lot of stunt casting for the time, But a solid effort. Just too bad that the Blu-ray (which I had hoped would improve on a 2003 DVD) is really inferior. Bad picture (albeit far better than the DVD's), lousy Dolby 2.0 mono sound (especially the English soundtrack), and at one point (a scene with Romy Schneider and Fröbe) the sound switches to German (maybe that scene was omitted for distribution in English-speaking countries?). By this flaw, we found the German soundtrack was actually the better option acoustically, especially since the majority of the protagonists would actually have been speaking German anyway.

    But we still liked the film (as I did before, or I wouldn't have wanted to get a better copy of it in the first place).
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy My Secret Lair
    Posts: 13,384
    Marnie 1964
    A fantastic performance from Sean Connery in this Hitchcock Classic
  • 007Aus007Aus Melbourne, Australia
    Posts: 8
    Finally got around to seeing 2021 The Suicide Squad. Probably one of the most enjoyable superhero movies I've seen in a long time. Massive fan of James Gunn's Troma work & his movie Super starring Rainn Wilson, this had a very similar vibe to that in terms of humour and gore.
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 3,050
    Shang-Chi and the Legend of the 10 Rings. Pretty great, I greatly enjoyed the mix of comedy and drama. MCU could learn from this movie by balancing the two, like Iron Man 1. Awkwafina was great, her comedy wasn’t forced like Darcy from Thor, and her seriousness wasn’t as emotionally stone-faced as Black Widow. Highly recommended.
  • LocqueLocque Escaped from a Namur prison
    edited September 2021 Posts: 262
    test
  • LocqueLocque Escaped from a Namur prison
    edited September 2021 Posts: 262
    1320091189-Last-Night-in-Soho-Movie_hires.jpg

    LAST NIGHT IN SOHO

    So instead of seeing Thunderball on the big screen, the main character goes into some nightclub next door.

    Very disappointed, zero stars!
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