The World War II Discussion Thread.

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  • Posts: 7,653
    Sadly we used to call them Nazis but their way of thinking still has lots of people agreeing and preaching the same idiocy, only this time they mostly have found another leader who wants to forward his own interests.
  • Posts: 19,339
    SaintMark wrote: »
    Sadly we used to call them Nazis but their way of thinking still has lots of people agreeing and preaching the same idiocy, only this time they mostly have found another leader who wants to forward his own interests.

    Any excuse to keep the ideology alive and well,alas.

  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    Insane story.
  • DragonpolDragonpol https://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    Posts: 18,003
    File it under SOB - Silly Old Bitch.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    File it under SOB - Silly Old Bitch.

    But that isn t enough, is it? Not when it comes to this one belief in how history unfolded. For everything else you can think of,they don t incarcerate you if your belief in anything at all differs from the standard. Death sentence for apostasy in muslim countries is an exception.
  • Posts: 19,339
    Man opens drain cover in back garden – and discovers World War II hideout left hidden for decades

    A homeowner was stunned to discover a secret WWII hideout tucked away in his back garden.

    Chris Scott made the incredible find when he decided to investigate the potential 'drain cover' at his home on Merton Avenue, Middlesborough.

    The 40-year-old spent two days draining the cavity with local builder Tony Sizer - and both were amazed to find an solid concrete Second World War bunker consisting of two rooms and two escape hatches.

    Tony had recently been renovating the property and had convinced homeowner Chris to have a further look at the flooded drain.


    AAxFb17.img?h=532&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=305&y=146

    It just looked like a drain cover,” said Chris.

    “The neighbours had mentioned a bunker but I hadn’t thought anymore about it.

    “I was talking to the builder about it while we were having a cup of tea in the garden and he said, ‘Come on let’s have a look!”

    The first cavity had a 10ft ladder and was so large it took two days of pumping to remove all of the water.


    AAxF3pA.img?h=532&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

    That room had an open wooden door that led to two further rooms set in solid concrete.

    The first of those rooms measured four metres by three metres and the second measured roughly five metres by three metres.

    At the end of that room, the pair found another door. Tony dug out the rubble behind the door and discovered another ladder.

    “It’s an emergency escape ladder in case the first one was destroyed or blocked by rubble from a bomb,” said Chris.


    AAxFdi8.img?h=532&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

    It’s not worth fully digging it out as it’s a small area.”

    Chris had been notified by neighbours about the possibility of the bunker's existence - but they had not seen it with their own eyes.

    “I’ll be asking them more about it,” he said.

    “We were really shocked by the size of it.

    There are a lot of electrics and switches down there and lights on the wall. A big table and lots of silt that could contain anything from back then.”

    Chris, who works as a managing director, currently lives nearby with his wife and three-week-old daughter while the house undergoes extensive reonvations.

    It is thought the bunker had been built for up to 100 local residents to take shelter from Nazi air raids.

    Middlesbrough had the unfortunate distinction of being the first major British town to be attacked by Luftwaffe bombers during the Blitz on the evening of May 25 1940.


    AAxFdid.img?h=532&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

    He said he is now hoping to carry out some work on the bunker' in the future to bring it back into use.

    “It’s a pretty big room and I will probably do something with it,” he said.

    “If I run a trench down and put some concrete steps and get some decent things, it might be worth doing something.”
  • CommanderRossCommanderRoss The bottom of a pitch lake in Eastern Trinidad, place called La Brea
    Posts: 8,121
    Epic! A free huge mancave!
  • Posts: 12,511
    barryt007 wrote: »
    Man opens drain cover in back garden – and discovers World War II hideout left hidden for decades

    A homeowner was stunned to discover a secret WWII hideout tucked away in his back garden.

    Chris Scott made the incredible find when he decided to investigate the potential 'drain cover' at his home on Merton Avenue, Middlesborough.

    The 40-year-old spent two days draining the cavity with local builder Tony Sizer - and both were amazed to find an solid concrete Second World War bunker consisting of two rooms and two escape hatches.

    Tony had recently been renovating the property and had convinced homeowner Chris to have a further look at the flooded drain.


    AAxFb17.img?h=532&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=305&y=146

    It just looked like a drain cover,” said Chris.

    “The neighbours had mentioned a bunker but I hadn’t thought anymore about it.

    “I was talking to the builder about it while we were having a cup of tea in the garden and he said, ‘Come on let’s have a look!”

    The first cavity had a 10ft ladder and was so large it took two days of pumping to remove all of the water.


    AAxF3pA.img?h=532&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

    That room had an open wooden door that led to two further rooms set in solid concrete.

    The first of those rooms measured four metres by three metres and the second measured roughly five metres by three metres.

    At the end of that room, the pair found another door. Tony dug out the rubble behind the door and discovered another ladder.

    “It’s an emergency escape ladder in case the first one was destroyed or blocked by rubble from a bomb,” said Chris.


    AAxFdi8.img?h=532&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

    It’s not worth fully digging it out as it’s a small area.”

    Chris had been notified by neighbours about the possibility of the bunker's existence - but they had not seen it with their own eyes.

    “I’ll be asking them more about it,” he said.

    “We were really shocked by the size of it.

    There are a lot of electrics and switches down there and lights on the wall. A big table and lots of silt that could contain anything from back then.”

    Chris, who works as a managing director, currently lives nearby with his wife and three-week-old daughter while the house undergoes extensive reonvations.

    It is thought the bunker had been built for up to 100 local residents to take shelter from Nazi air raids.

    Middlesbrough had the unfortunate distinction of being the first major British town to be attacked by Luftwaffe bombers during the Blitz on the evening of May 25 1940.


    AAxFdid.img?h=532&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

    He said he is now hoping to carry out some work on the bunker' in the future to bring it back into use.

    “It’s a pretty big room and I will probably do something with it,” he said.

    “If I run a trench down and put some concrete steps and get some decent things, it might be worth doing something.”

    That is incredible!!!!
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
  • Posts: 5,903
  • Posts: 19,339
    A sad sad moment,another hero gone :

    Another of The Few is lost: Veteran spitfire pilot, 101, becomes the third of the last surviving Battle of Britain heroes to die in a month.

    BBLHkZd.img?h=742&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=2434&y=1203

    One of the last surviving Battle of Britain veterans, whose courage and bravery under fire helped save Britain from Nazi tyranny, has died aged 101.


    Tributes have poured in for Flight Lieutenant Ronald Mackay, who flew Spitfires with No 234 Squadron and helped protect Britain's skies from German bombers during the Second World War.

    Flt Lt Mackay, who was once seriously injured baling out of his aircraft following a sortie, was one of the final nine remaining members of 'The Few', after the deaths of two fellow survivors in July.
    There are now only eight remaining Battle of Britain veterans following the death of Flt Lt Mackay, Wing Commander Tom Neil and Squadron Leader Geoffrey Wellum - both of whom died in July.


    The group of men were dubbed The Few following Winston Churchill's wartime address to Parliament, where he poignantly said of the brave RAF pilots: 'Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.'

    David Brocklehurst MBE, chairman of the Kent Battle of Britain Museum, said: 'Our thoughts and condolences are with his family and friends at this difficult time.

    'Our flag will be flown at half mast for the next seven days as a mark of respect.

    Wing Commander Tom Neil :
    BBLHcy3.img?h=1080&w=1920&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=315&y=258

    Squadron Leader Geoffrey Wellen :
    BBLHjH3.img?h=491&w=634&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=316&y=150

    'Sadly nature is taking its course and we have lost three of The Few in the past month.

    'Now there are only eight surviving Battle of Britain veterans, the oldest is 105 and the youngest 98.

    'He should be remembered for his bravery. Many of them said they were not heroes, just doing their duty, but we see them all as heroes.

    'It makes it all the more important that we carry on their legacy as there will be a time when they will no longer be able to do so.'

    Group Captain Patrick Tootal OBE, Honorary Secretary of the Battle of Britain Fighter Association, said: 'The loss of one of the Few is very sad. In the past weeks we have lost three.'

    Air Chief Marshal Sir Stephen Hillier, Chief of the Air Staff, Tweeted: 'Very sad to hear that another of The Few is lost to us - Flt Lt Ronald MacKay, Spitfire pilot with 234 Sqn during the Battle of Britain.'

    Flt Lt Ronald Mackay was born in 1917 and served in the Auxiliary Air Force before the war.

    He was called to full time service in late August 1939, joining 603 Squadron as a civilian pupil pilot the following month.
    After elementary training in Perth, central Scotland, he was commissioned on March 23, 1940, before completing his intermediate and advanced flying training at RAF Lossiemouth, north Scotland.

    Flt Lt Mackay joined No 234 Squadron at RAF Middle Wallop, Hampshire, on September 18, 1940.

    Returning from St Eval after a routine sortie on September 25, 1940, he baled out and was seriously injured.

    His Spitfire, X4182, crashed near St Mawgan in north Cornwall.
    After being released from the RAF in January 1946, he ran the family travel business in Scotland for many years.


    He died surrounded by his family in Edinburgh on Saturday, August 4.

    The remaining surviving members of The Few are Flight Lieutenant William Clark, 219 Squadron; Wing Commander John Elkington, 1 Squadron; Wing Commander Paul Farnes, 501 Squadron; Squadron Leader John Hart, 602

    Squadron; Flying Officer John Hemmingway, 86 Squadron; Flight Lieutenant William Hughes, 23 Squadron; Pilot Officer Archie McInnes, 601 Squadron; Flight Lieutenant Maurice Moundson, 56 Squadron.

    Squadron Leader Geoffrey Wellen :
    BBLHjH6.img?h=400&w=314&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=209&y=312

    Wing Commander Tom Neil :
    BBLH7F9.img?h=400&w=288&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=238&y=212

    RIP and thank you from the people here who will NEVER forget what you did for us.

    2aeb5de6a7b823129d1850fd63d91b04--battle-of-britain-british-things.jpg
  • CommanderRossCommanderRoss The bottom of a pitch lake in Eastern Trinidad, place called La Brea
    Posts: 8,121
    RIP. Of course those men, who'd run to their kites day in and out, exhausted, into a certain life-death situation, were heroes!
  • edited February 2019 Posts: 338
    And some Japanese soldiers of WWII.
    And depraved perpetrators of horrific war crimes who fought alongside true heroes. On all sides.
    A lot to pay for.

    Worse still, the Japanese have never officially accepted or apologized for their use of women as 'comfort girls'. Women from all occupied territories, of all backgrounds, were used as sex slaves in the way ISIS is doing now too.

    Genuine question, what is the view of modern day Americans and the modern US state to what was, arguably, genocide or holocaust in the treatment of Native Americans?

    This article, for example, suggests US is in denial. Is the article unfair?
    https://newsmaven.io/indiancountrytoday/archive/native-american-genocide-or-holocaust-f9BbVANPQEOn_BzVGhOJ5g/
  • CommanderRossCommanderRoss The bottom of a pitch lake in Eastern Trinidad, place called La Brea
    Posts: 8,121
    Troy wrote: »
    And some Japanese soldiers of WWII.
    And depraved perpetrators of horrific war crimes who fought alongside true heroes. On all sides.
    A lot to pay for.

    Worse still, the Japanese have never officially accepted or apologized for their use of women as 'comfort girls'. Women from all occupied territories, of all backgrounds, were used as sex slaves in the way ISIS is doing now too.

    Genuine question, what is the view of modern day Americans and the modern US state to what was, arguably, genocide or holocaust in the treatment of Native Americans?

    This article, for example, suggests US is in denial. Is the article unfair?
    https://newsmaven.io/indiancountrytoday/archive/native-american-genocide-or-holocaust-f9BbVANPQEOn_BzVGhOJ5g/

    It's a fair enough question. I disagree with the use of the word 'holocaust' as it indeed is reserved for the one-historical event. It stands out in the way it was executed. However 'genocide' seems appropriate, allthough I know not enough of the subject.
  • Posts: 5,903
    Yesterday, a souvenir of WW II caused quite a lot of perturbations in Paris. More precisely, an american 500 kgs bomb that had to be neutralized. As a result, traffic on road and rail was halted, and 1900 people had to leave their homes the time the bomb was exploded :

    leparisien.fr/societe/deminage-a-paris-la-bombe-a-explose-la-vie-va-reprendre-porte-de-la-chapelle-17-02-2019-8013816.php

    It has happened frequently in my hometown of Brest.
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    edited February 2019 Posts: 3,985
    I've been delving into WW2 history lately and have learned some interesting things i had no idea of.

    I was suprised to learn of Rudolph Hess's secret solo flight to Britain in 1941 in an attempt to broker a peace deal with the British. He parachuted into Scotland and was kept prisoner until after the war when he was sent to Nuremberg to stand trial.

    Apparently the 'chimney' that stands at Auchwitz was built by the Russians after it was liberated....

  • CommanderRossCommanderRoss The bottom of a pitch lake in Eastern Trinidad, place called La Brea
    Posts: 8,121
    In 1947, when the Auschwitz camp became a Museum, the Krema I gas chamber was reconstructed according to the descriptions given by the survivors. Two of the three ovens were reconstructed from parts found in the camp. However, visitors to Auschwitz were told for 50 years that the reconstructed gas chamber was original.
    source:
    https://www.scrapbookpages.com/AuschwitzScrapbook/History/Articles/Birkenau01.html

    Doesn't surprise me, 80% of 'historical' buildings in Europe ar rebuilt because of earlier destruction.

    Rudolph Hess's flight is still a controversy. He apparently acted on his own, without Hitlser's knowledge.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    Posts: 8,823
    Gerard wrote: »
    Yesterday, a souvenir of WW II caused quite a lot of perturbations in Paris. More precisely, an american 500 kgs bomb that had to be neutralized. As a result, traffic on road and rail was halted, and 1900 people had to leave their homes the time the bomb was exploded :

    leparisien.fr/societe/deminage-a-paris-la-bombe-a-explose-la-vie-va-reprendre-porte-de-la-chapelle-17-02-2019-8013816.php

    It has happened frequently in my hometown of Brest.

    Without getting into the issue of who was responsible AT ALL, unexploded ordnance (UXO) is still pretty much daily business here in Germany. The allies dropped about 1,35 million metric tons (TNT content) of bombs on Germany, and somewhere between 10 and 20 per cent were duds. Estimates say that about 100,000 of those duds (not kilos) haven't even been detected. So it is still basically every other week or so that (with construction activities going rampant) yet another 1,000-lb bomb is discovered and has to be defused, with trains being stopped and roads being blocked. Annoying, but normal. Fortunately hardly any of them ever explode while being defused.
  • CommanderRossCommanderRoss The bottom of a pitch lake in Eastern Trinidad, place called La Brea
    Posts: 8,121
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    Gerard wrote: »
    Yesterday, a souvenir of WW II caused quite a lot of perturbations in Paris. More precisely, an american 500 kgs bomb that had to be neutralized. As a result, traffic on road and rail was halted, and 1900 people had to leave their homes the time the bomb was exploded :

    leparisien.fr/societe/deminage-a-paris-la-bombe-a-explose-la-vie-va-reprendre-porte-de-la-chapelle-17-02-2019-8013816.php

    It has happened frequently in my hometown of Brest.

    Without getting into the issue of who was responsible AT ALL, unexploded ordnance (UXO) is still pretty much daily business here in Germany. The allies dropped about 1,35 million metric tons (TNT content) of bombs on Germany, and somewhere between 10 and 20 per cent were duds. Estimates say that about 100,000 of those duds (not kilos) haven't even been detected. So it is still basically every other week or so that (with construction activities going rampant) yet another 1,000-lb bomb is discovered and has to be defused, with trains being stopped and roads being blocked. Annoying, but normal. Fortunately hardly any of them ever explode while being defused.

    Well not as much as in Germany, but in Holland the same problem persists. And in Belgium still every year 2 or three farmers die whilst working because they drag up unexploded ordnances from the first world war. You can see grenades and more lay next to the fields waiting for the explosives services to pick them up.

  • edited April 2019 Posts: 19,339
    Today (9th April) in 1940 Vidkun Quisling seized power in Norway,the same day Nazi Germany invaded,but failed at the first attempt,finally gaining power in September of the same year.

    This guy was a serious Nazi arse kisser,who even Hitler didn't like.
    Betrayed his country terribly,but got his comeuppance at the end of the War in front of a Norwegian firing squad.

    standard_quisling-vidkun_nrk.jpg

    Hence the word 'quisling' in many dialects today,meaning traitor or betrayer.

  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    As far as I know, it was just called "Germany" back then as well.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    Posts: 8,823
    As far as I know, it was just called "Germany" back then as well.
    It was called "Deutsches Reich" from 1871 until 1845, and the last twelve years of that was run by the Nazis. So nothing wrong with "Nazi Germany" for my taste.
  • Posts: 7,506
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    SaintMark wrote: »
    It was 2-0 by 1945 and I am glad there will not be rematch anytime soon.

    The score is currently 3-0 - don't forget 1966 and all that.

    And not forgetting Brexit where we stitched up the Krauts yet again!


    Reading this in 2019 made me chuckle! ;))
  • DragonpolDragonpol https://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    Posts: 18,003
    jobo wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    SaintMark wrote: »
    It was 2-0 by 1945 and I am glad there will not be rematch anytime soon.

    The score is currently 3-0 - don't forget 1966 and all that.

    And not forgetting Brexit where we stitched up the Krauts yet again!


    Reading this in 2019 made me chuckle! ;))

    The game's not over yet, my friend. ;)
  • 007Blofeld007Blofeld In the freedom of the West.
    edited April 2019 Posts: 3,126
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    As far as I know, it was just called "Germany" back then as well.
    It was called "Deutsches Reich" from 1871 until 1845, and the last twelve years of that was run by the Nazis. So nothing wrong with "Nazi Germany" for my taste.

    @j_w_pepper so your point is?
  • edited April 2019 Posts: 19,339
    007Blofeld wrote: »
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    As far as I know, it was just called "Germany" back then as well.
    It was called "Deutsches Reich" from 1871 until 1845, and the last twelve years of that was run by the Nazis. So nothing wrong with "Nazi Germany" for my taste.

    @JWPepper so your point is?

    @JWPepper point is,in a purely historical discussion of a war ,the Nazi party were there since 1933 until the end ,so it is entirely justified , however,these comments are supposed to be about about Quisling for discussion atm .
  • mattjoesmattjoes DAY OF THE BROSNAN
    Posts: 6,928
    Fellas, you're talking about j_w_pepper while tagging JWPepper!
  • JWPepperJWPepper You sit on it, but you can't take it with you.
    edited April 2019 Posts: 512
    mattjoes wrote: »
    Fellas, you're talking about j_w_pepper while tagging JWPepper!

    Thank you!:-)
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    barryt007 wrote: »
    007Blofeld wrote: »
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    As far as I know, it was just called "Germany" back then as well.
    It was called "Deutsches Reich" from 1871 until 1845, and the last twelve years of that was run by the Nazis. So nothing wrong with "Nazi Germany" for my taste.

    @JWPepper so your point is?

    @JWPepper point is,in a purely historical discussion of a war ,the Nazi party were there since 1933 until the end ,so it is entirely justified , however,these comments are supposed to be about about Quisling for discussion atm .

    The leader of Nazi Norway.
  • DragonpolDragonpol https://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    Posts: 18,003
    Funnily enough I was just thinking of Quisling yesterday before I saw these posts.
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