*Your most emotional movie viewing experience*

124

Comments

  • Major_BoothroydMajor_Boothroyd Republic of Isthmus
    Posts: 2,721
    The Remains of the Day. An utter waste of life has never been so elegantly, delicately and smartly portrayed. True feelings repressed in service of an illusion and at the expense of happiness. One of my most treasured films. The book is just as wonderful.
  • MrcogginsMrcoggins Following in the footsteps of Quentin Quigley.
    Posts: 3,144
    The Remains of the Day. An utter waste of life has never been so elegantly, delicately and smartly portrayed. True feelings repressed in service of an illusion and at the expense of happiness. One of my most treasured films. The book is just as wonderful.

    Hear Hear Major =D> .
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 8,031
    I found "Room" last year to be a really moving experience.

    Not even so much on its own terms but because the preview screening I was at had a lady who was the victim of a similar experience. There were lots of tears and I couldn't help but get a bit shellshocked by it all!
  • Kingsman golden circle Merlins death
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 40,462
    The ones that always come to mind are Man on Fire but the one that really gets me these days is Children of Men.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    Posts: 8,684
    This just popped up for me for the first time since joining the board in February 2017.

    I don't remember any movie necessarily making me burst into tears (and the only Bond movie coming close is NTTD), but I have a few ones that I watch if I think some sentimentality is in order (and sometimes I do, since it is so rewarding. They sort of intermingle with my favourite feel-good movies (nothing wrong with that, if "emotional" is the criterion, I guess).

    The Legend of 1900 (La leggenda dell' pianista sull' oceano), Giuseppe Tornatore, 1998. Probably my favourite movie ever...with one of Morricone's best scores.

    Cinema Paradiso (or the extended version Nuovo Cinema Paradiso), also by Giuseppe Tornatore, ten years earlier...and also with one of Morricone's best scores.

    (Some other Tornatore movies may also qualify regarding "emotions", that's definitely one of his strong suits...doesn't mean they are ultimately better than movies evoking fewer emotions from me.)

    A banal addition: Sister Act (1992). I could watch that film every two days and feel elated every time when the nun choir sings "I Will Follow Him" etc. And I don't even believe in God.

    There are a few others where I'm not so sure if it's just because they are sure to cheer me up by their humour (say Lubitsch or Wilder) or because they actually touch me emotionally. It's just a decision that I have to make. I have had Life is Beautiful on BD for ages but not watched it because I don't know how I would react to it. War Horse, in spite of having rested on my shelf for ten years or so, remains untouched, mainly because my wife doesn't want to see horses being killed in war. Just picking a humourous movie (or the umpteenth Bond film) mostly seems to be the safer bet.



  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 8,031
    Carlito's Way. The ending never fails to stir up my emotions.
  • Posts: 12,264
    Off the top of my head, Spielberg’s A.I., The Fox and the Hound, Dumbo, del Toro’s Pinocchio, Grave of the Fireflies. Animation tends to make me most emotional.
  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe "I tolerate this century, but I don't enjoy it."Moderator
    edited March 2023 Posts: 13,894
    Anything where the doggo dies, or shows the undying loyalty of mans best friend.

    Hachi: A Dog's Tale
    Marley & Me
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 40,462
    Anything where the doggo dies, or shows the undying loyalty of mans best friend.

    Hachi: A Dog's Tale
    Marley & Me

    Hachi destroyed me. I've mentioned the story here before but I oversaw my college's film night program for a couple of years and this one was on the schedule one week. Not a single soul showed up but it was so damn emotional that I had to see it through to the end. It's a heartbreaking movie; melodramatic as hell but very sad.
  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe "I tolerate this century, but I don't enjoy it."Moderator
    edited March 2023 Posts: 13,894
    Creasy47 wrote: »
    Anything where the doggo dies, or shows the undying loyalty of mans best friend.

    Hachi: A Dog's Tale
    Marley & Me

    Hachi destroyed me. I've mentioned the story here before but I oversaw my college's film night program for a couple of years and this one was on the schedule one week. Not a single soul showed up but it was so damn emotional that I had to see it through to the end. It's a heartbreaking movie; melodramatic as hell but very sad.

    It was a very melodramatic film, but there were tears were flowing at the end. I had to go and give my dog a big hug afterwards. We don't deserve them.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 40,462
    Creasy47 wrote: »
    Anything where the doggo dies, or shows the undying loyalty of mans best friend.

    Hachi: A Dog's Tale
    Marley & Me

    Hachi destroyed me. I've mentioned the story here before but I oversaw my college's film night program for a couple of years and this one was on the schedule one week. Not a single soul showed up but it was so damn emotional that I had to see it through to the end. It's a heartbreaking movie; melodramatic as hell but very sad.

    It was a very melodramatic film, but there were tears were flowing at the end. I had to go and give my dog a big hug afterwards. We don't deserve them.

    You and I both. We definitely don't deserve them.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    edited March 2023 Posts: 8,684
    Creasy47 wrote: »
    Creasy47 wrote: »
    Anything where the doggo dies, or shows the undying loyalty of mans best friend.

    Hachi: A Dog's Tale
    Marley & Me

    Hachi destroyed me. I've mentioned the story here before but I oversaw my college's film night program for a couple of years and this one was on the schedule one week. Not a single soul showed up but it was so damn emotional that I had to see it through to the end. It's a heartbreaking movie; melodramatic as hell but very sad.

    It was a very melodramatic film, but there were tears were flowing at the end. I had to go and give my dog a big hug afterwards. We don't deserve them.

    You and I both. We definitely don't deserve them.

    Thanks for the warning. I now know why I haven't watched Hachi so far...and suppose that won't ever change.
  • goldenswissroyalegoldenswissroyale Switzerland
    Posts: 4,394
    I went through the whole thread and wondered if I would be the first one mentioning Hachi. Then, finally on this page this film about the relationship between a man and his dog came up.
    I believe that I never cried longer than in this movie. I think, I cried the whole damn last half hour. The loyality and grieve of the dog combined with the music (I think some kind of piano sound) was too much to control my tears. I cried so much that I almost dehydrated
    ;)
    And this was before I became a father and before we had a dog. I'm not sure if I would survive this movie now! Being a father changed my hormones and I get wet eyes in way too many movies...and now with the dog next to me on the couch...no, I don't think I can watch this one ever again (!)
    Another movie I already cried as a young man was The Green Mile.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 40,462
    I went through the whole thread and wondered if I would be the first one mentioning Hachi. Then, finally on this page this film about the relationship between a man and his dog came up.
    I believe that I never cried longer than in this movie. I think, I cried the whole damn last half hour. The loyality and grieve of the dog combined with the music (I think some kind of piano sound) was too much to control my tears. I cried so much that I almost dehydrated
    ;)
    And this was before I became a father and before we had a dog. I'm not sure if I would survive this movie now! Being a father changed my hormones and I get wet eyes in way too many movies...and now with the dog next to me on the couch...no, I don't think I can watch this one ever again (!)
    Another movie I already cried as a young man was The Green Mile.

    That's a good point; I remember the entire back half being packed with emotion, it's not like it's a depressing final five minutes and that's it. It stabs your heart for a long time before the credits roll.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    Posts: 8,684
    I (fortunately, I guess) don't remember watching The Green Mile in detail...except the following: I do remember being repelled by the sheer idiocy of that movie, giving us a crew of paid criminal killers (the death row gang) as supposedly the good guys, combined with a pseudo-christian story, complete with CGI hiccups of the victim to claim he's the Chosen One. It's one of the few films I hated right away, could not relate to at all, regret ever having bought on disc, and have no desire to see again.

    (PS: For the benefit of Darabond, I liked Shawshank alright in comparison, though I don't see why it is in the IMDb top 50, much less in the top ten or what it used to be. But far better than that Green Mile wreck. Awful movie, the latter one.)
  • goldenswissroyalegoldenswissroyale Switzerland
    Posts: 4,394
    I have seen The Green Mile only once and I can understand that it isn't for everyone. There are some strange parts in it but anyway, I definitely remember that it hit me hard at some point. I also remember that a movie magazine asked famous people for a while(many years ago) at which movie they cried the last time and Green Mile was mentioned the most.
  • Posts: 3,168
    For me....nothing beats the end of 'Atonement'
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,690
    Somewhere In Time because I'm a romantic fool...
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    Posts: 6,780
    I always cry like a baby at the end of The Lives of Others (Das Leben der Anderen)
  • Posts: 6,808
    The ending of the 'The Railway Children'
    Though its not sad, the opposite in fact, its the way Jenny Agutter delivers the line "Daddy... my Daddy!"
    Gets me every frickin time!
  • goldenswissroyalegoldenswissroyale Switzerland
    Posts: 4,394
    GoldenGun wrote: »
    I always cry like a baby at the end of The Lives of Others (Das Leben der Anderen)

    I only remember that it was a good movie but can't remember what the ending was and how touching it was...
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    Posts: 3,985
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    I (fortunately, I guess) don't remember watching The Green Mile in detail...except the following: I do remember being repelled by the sheer idiocy of that movie, giving us a crew of paid criminal killers (the death row gang) as supposedly the good guys, combined with a pseudo-christian story, complete with CGI hiccups of the victim to claim he's the Chosen One. It's one of the few films I hated right away, could not relate to at all, regret ever having bought on disc, and have no desire to see again.

    (PS: For the benefit of Darabond, I liked Shawshank alright in comparison, though I don't see why it is in the IMDb top 50, much less in the top ten or what it used to be. But far better than that Green Mile wreck. Awful movie, the latter one.)

    The convicts in American prison movies are always the good guys...😁
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    Posts: 8,684
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    I (fortunately, I guess) don't remember watching The Green Mile in detail...except the following: I do remember being repelled by the sheer idiocy of that movie, giving us a crew of paid criminal killers (the death row gang) as supposedly the good guys, combined with a pseudo-christian story, complete with CGI hiccups of the victim to claim he's the Chosen One. It's one of the few films I hated right away, could not relate to at all, regret ever having bought on disc, and have no desire to see again.

    (PS: For the benefit of Darabond, I liked Shawshank alright in comparison, though I don't see why it is in the IMDb top 50, much less in the top ten or what it used to be. But far better than that Green Mile wreck. Awful movie, the latter one.)

    The convicts in American prison movies are always the good guys...😁

    Only that I was not talking about the convicts, but the Death Row staff (with a few baddies thrown in, but still). Happy normal all-American men just doing their jobs.
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    Posts: 3,985
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    I (fortunately, I guess) don't remember watching The Green Mile in detail...except the following: I do remember being repelled by the sheer idiocy of that movie, giving us a crew of paid criminal killers (the death row gang) as supposedly the good guys, combined with a pseudo-christian story, complete with CGI hiccups of the victim to claim he's the Chosen One. It's one of the few films I hated right away, could not relate to at all, regret ever having bought on disc, and have no desire to see again.

    (PS: For the benefit of Darabond, I liked Shawshank alright in comparison, though I don't see why it is in the IMDb top 50, much less in the top ten or what it used to be. But far better than that Green Mile wreck. Awful movie, the latter one.)

    The convicts in American prison movies are always the good guys...😁

    Only that I was not talking about the convicts, but the Death Row staff (with a few baddies thrown in, but still). Happy normal all-American men just doing their jobs.

    Well back when it was set it was probably a pretty standard job, even if it did involve killing folk. I remember one of the staff in the film was a nasty little sadist. But the rest were pretty normal family men who just happened to work on death row.

    I prefer Stephen King's story to the overwrought film.
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    edited March 2023 Posts: 3,985
    A more recent one was Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk

    A film that really embraced the incredible heroism of that moment in history.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    Posts: 8,684
    A more recent one was Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk

    A film that really embraced the incredible heroism of that moment in history.
    I bought this, but haven't watched it yet. Probably has something to do with my general disdain of Christopher Nolan films, which was somehow overcome by my love of historical movies and a possibly low price on amazon.de a few years ago. But one of these days, when I feel like it...
  • GoldenGunGoldenGun Per ora e per il momento che verrà
    Posts: 6,780
    GoldenGun wrote: »
    I always cry like a baby at the end of The Lives of Others (Das Leben der Anderen)

    I only remember that it was a good movie but can't remember what the ending was and how touching it was...

    I must admit, I cry easily ;)
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    Posts: 3,985
    I must admit, the ending of Top Gun Maverick got me all emotional...

    It's cheese, but it's good cheese...🤤
  • Posts: 2,400
    Everything Everywhere All at Once has wrecked me 35 times and counting.
Sign In or Register to comment.