The Cinematography of Bond 25 - Linus Sandgren

in Bond 25 Posts: 2,879
We had a similar thread for Hoyte van Hoytema's work in SP. It makes sense to devote an entire thread, so cinematography nerds like me can bask in the glow of Sandgren's work.

He's a very interesting DP. He is mostly known for his grainy 35mm work. He has utilised a lot of handheld work for David O Russell and took a similar veritie style for First Man.

Though, his most acclaimed work is La La Land. That is much more classically composed in terms of framing with elegant and bright lighting. That film has a deliberately idiosyncratic feel.

He's clearly very versatile. However, i think his work with Russell and First Man will be more indicative of the style he will utilise for Bond.

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Comments

  • Posts: 3,330
    Looking good.
  • Posts: 1,660
    And should probably mention his IMAX work on First Man as well - as seems like a lot of the film will be in the format:


  • PavloPavlo Ukraine
    Posts: 209
    antovolk wrote: »
    And should probably mention his IMAX work on First Man as well - as seems like a lot of the film will be in the format:



    I think his experience working with IMAX film! cameras is one of the reasons (if not the key) why Cary decided to work with Linus on Bond25. There are not so many (few, to tell the truth) cinematographers in Hollywood who has experience working with these cameras. Hoyte probably is the main master, but he is busy working on "Tenet". I think, it was basic idea of Cary to shoot selected scenes on IMAX (+he is fan of film format) and then he searched for cinematographer with experience and Linus was maybe the best variant.
  • jake24jake24 Sitting at your desk, kissing your lover, eating supper with your familyModerator
    Posts: 9,515
    If Sandgren's cinematography is as nice as the BTS shots from the Jamaica vid, I'll be happy.
  • PavloPavlo Ukraine
    Posts: 209
    Worth noting that Cary himself is acclaimed cinematographer and it makes his collaboration with Linus even more promising.
  • M_BaljeM_Balje Amsterdam, Netherlands
    edited July 4 Posts: 3,076
    From Videoblog https://www.youtube.com/watch?=6&v=NQkO0Shirl8 (25 June 2019)
    Bond-25-25-June-2019-first-footage.jpg
    ''Sunny Skyfall''

    The-spots-and-Umbrella-Bond-25.jpg
    ''The spots and Umbrella''' (playing with three spots of gunbarrel & the light and possible intro of the villian. )

    Walk-a-Way-from-a-palm-three-Bond-25.jpg
    ''Walk a way from a palm tree''
    .

  • PavloPavlo Ukraine
    Posts: 209
    Really like how Linus deals with colours. He is very direct in expressing colour, all objects have clear borders that are defined by sharp colour contrast. Of course shooting on film with its unique depth, grade helps Linus to do this with colour. Jamaica part must be phenomenal visually because of Jamaica colour richness and style of Linus.
  • Posts: 11,047
    The man clearly has massive talent from what I have seen!
  • Posts: 2,879
    Does anyone know why Linus seems to be using two camera's? It seems that he shoots with two camera's at once, which is quite unusual.
  • PavloPavlo Ukraine
    edited July 14 Posts: 209
    Does anyone know why Linus seems to be using two camera's? It seems that he shoots with two camera's at once, which is quite unusual.

    It's very common. Not something strange at all. All Bond film with Daniel were shot on combinations of cameras.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    edited July 14 Posts: 3,205
    Does anyone know why Linus seems to be using two camera's? It seems that he shoots with two camera's at once, which is quite unusual.

    There are numerous different explanations for this that really only Sandgren could confirm. Sometimes, camera crews have two units on set - while one is shooting the other is being prepped for the next setup if it requires a lens change and/or any modifications. That mostly only applies to TV productions where a compressed schedule is a bigger issue and this method is viewed as being a timesaver.

    Single-camera setups offer more flexibility with lighting, but Sandgren's lighting style might nullify that issue and enable him to shoot with two cameras; capture the scene on a wide-prime, then have a longer focal length prime on the second camera (or whatever lens combination he chooses to use, I guess).

    However, on the whole, multi-cam set ups aren't unusual at all, especially if shooting in a studio setting. Ridley Scott sets almost always uses three cameras rolling at once, sometimes more. This is simply to have maximum coverage of a scene or to make sure you capture all the little emotions that might be lost if you call "cut" and have to move to another setup and have the actor do it all again. Michael Mann had Dante Spinotti shoot the Heat café scene with three cameras rolling at once, because the scene was so pivotal in the film and relied so heavily on the actors reactions to each other in that moment.

    For Bond 25, you will notice in the promo video that there are two angles on Nomi on the monitor, (a front profile and a side profile) which would lead me to believe that Fukanaga and Sandgren are following a similar approach to Michael Mann in this instance, at least during key scenes.

    And of course, almost all action scenes are shot with multi-cam setups for obvious reasons.
  • HildebrandRarityHildebrandRarity Centre international d'assistance aux personnes déplacées, Paris, France
    Posts: 122
    There's a reason for which Peter Sellers' best work is with technical-savvy directors such as Stanley Kubrick (Lolita, Dr. Strangelove) or Blake Edwards. Sellers was extraordinary at improv, but he would lose energy after a couple of takes. So, any director had to have a flawless set up by take one. Kubrick decided to use three cameras for any scene involving Sellers, as if it were live TV to be sure not to miss any detail or be forced to use an inferior take.
  • Posts: 2,879
    Does anyone know why Linus seems to be using two camera's? It seems that he shoots with two camera's at once, which is quite unusual.

    There are numerous different explanations for this that really only Sandgren could confirm. Sometimes, camera crews have two units on set - while one is shooting the other is being prepped for the next setup if it requires a lens change and/or any modifications. That mostly only applies to TV productions where a compressed schedule is a bigger issue and this method is viewed as being a timesaver.

    Single-camera setups offer more flexibility with lighting, but Sandgren's lighting style might nullify that issue and enable him to shoot with two cameras; capture the scene on a wide-prime, then have a longer focal length prime on the second camera (or whatever lens combination he chooses to use, I guess).

    However, on the whole, multi-cam set ups aren't unusual at all, especially if shooting in a studio setting. Ridley Scott sets almost always uses three cameras rolling at once, sometimes more. This is simply to have maximum coverage of a scene or to make sure you capture all the little emotions that might be lost if you call "cut" and have to move to another setup and have the actor do it all again. Michael Mann had Dante Spinotti shoot the Heat café scene with three cameras rolling at once, because the scene was so pivotal in the film and relied so heavily on the actors reactions to each other in that moment.

    For Bond 25, you will notice in the promo video that there are two angles on Nomi on the monitor, (a front profile and a side profile) which would lead me to believe that Fukanaga and Sandgren are following a similar approach to Michael Mann in this instance, at least during key scenes.

    And of course, almost action scenes are shot with multi-cam setups for obvious reasons.

    Thank you, very helpful.

    I've noticed in pretty much every shot set-up and look a the monitors. Sandgren and Fukunaga seem to shoot one in profile and the other being a symmetrical mid-shot. The latter is a little more unusual for this type of movie.

    Here's an interview of Sandgren talking about his style. I'm looking so forward to hearing him talk about Bond 25's visual look:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=359&v=HNk9TARz3gE
  • Posts: 2,859
    Does anyone know why Linus seems to be using two camera's? It seems that he shoots with two camera's at once, which is quite unusual.

    There are numerous different explanations for this that really only Sandgren could confirm. Sometimes, camera crews have two units on set - while one is shooting the other is being prepped for the next setup if it requires a lens change and/or any modifications. That mostly only applies to TV productions where a compressed schedule is a bigger issue and this method is viewed as being a timesaver.

    Single-camera setups offer more flexibility with lighting, but Sandgren's lighting style might nullify that issue and enable him to shoot with two cameras; capture the scene on a wide-prime, then have a longer focal length prime on the second camera (or whatever lens combination he chooses to use, I guess).

    However, on the whole, multi-cam set ups aren't unusual at all, especially if shooting in a studio setting. Ridley Scott sets almost always uses three cameras rolling at once, sometimes more. This is simply to have maximum coverage of a scene or to make sure you capture all the little emotions that might be lost if you call "cut" and have to move to another setup and have the actor do it all again. Michael Mann had Dante Spinotti shoot the Heat café scene with three cameras rolling at once, because the scene was so pivotal in the film and relied so heavily on the actors reactions to each other in that moment.

    For Bond 25, you will notice in the promo video that there are two angles on Nomi on the monitor, (a front profile and a side profile) which would lead me to believe that Fukanaga and Sandgren are following a similar approach to Michael Mann in this instance, at least during key scenes.

    And of course, almost action scenes are shot with multi-cam setups for obvious reasons.

    Thank you, very helpful.

    I've noticed in pretty much every shot set-up and look a the monitors. Sandgren and Fukunaga seem to shoot one in profile and the other being a symmetrical mid-shot. The latter is a little more unusual for this type of movie.

    Here's an interview of Sandgren talking about his style. I'm looking so forward to hearing him talk about Bond 25's visual look:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=359&v=HNk9TARz3gE

    That bit around the 7m mark reassured me we're in for something really special.
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