Cary Joji Fukunaga Film Club

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  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded the Ballrooms of Mars
    Posts: 12,459
    Not worried at all about "creative differences" seemingly be a tag for Cary.
  • edited November 2018 Posts: 4,400
    peter wrote: »
    some like The Alienist saw him removed as director)
    , can you reference an actual source on this? Someone who worked on the show? Because I happen to know a couple of people on this production, and this is news to me.
    his unfaltering resume combined with his ego - alongside the lack of news - has made me thing that he could be a troublesome figure for Eon.
    . Wow. Quite a statement. His "ego"? with lack of news... Like @ColonelSun has said just recently said, this is pre-production. And, quite frankly, if you're not involved in this production, no news will be forthcoming-- especially to fans who gather info from the various "news" outlets.

    We know that Fukunaga quit the show after committing to direct. However, I think I oversold the notion that he was 'dropped' from The Alienist. The official reason seems to be scheduling difficulties:
    https://deadline.com/2016/09/the-alienist-jakob-verbruggen-direct-tnt-series-cary-fukunaga-pulls-out-ep-1201824912/

    Though the Deadline article does talk through the numerous problems Fukunaga ran into with TNT prior to departing. Though many seem to boil down to more logistical opposed to creative issues (budget, locations, schedules being cited).

    Nonetheless, Fukunaga's biggest studio gig (prior to Bond) was It and he's openly admitted that the studio grew frightful of his take on the material and the project was given to another director.

    https://variety.com/2015/film/news/cary-fukunaga-it-exit-1201584416/

    He talks candidly of the creative difficulties he had. He wanted to make a slow burn horror film that was character-driven and weaved its narrative over two films. The studio wanted a more conventional horror film with jump scares.

    The final product is very much the latter. It's overly crammed with characters who essentially serve archetypes and whilst it can be frightening - it does rely overly on jump scares. Nonetheless, it is rather fun and kitsch nonsense (it's quite enjoyable and I'd recommend it). However, I much preferred the portions where the kids are out being kids. The irony being that Stranger Things did Stephen King better It.

    Fukunaga has even admitted to being 'difficult' and stated that it has kept him getting studio gigs due to some perceived reputation. Whether it be true or not:

    https://www.gq.com/story/cary-fukunaga-netflix-maniac
  • peterpeter Toronto
    Posts: 7,960
    there's a difference where there are scheduling conflicts, and being fired.

    And semantics: he's "difficult". When a director has a very strong vision that runs against the grain, a producer(s) will have the right to say that's not working for us. That's fair and it's part of the business. That has nothing to do with "ego". It's not as if CF had a vision for IT just to be contrarian. No, he had a vision for that story that wasn't gelling with the producers.

    It all worked out fine, and I have yet to read, or hear, of anyone slamming CF-- other than Nic Pizzolatto's bruised feelings when CF polished some of his work on TD (a common occurrence on any project; our own @ColonelSun has an interesting story where he had to clean-up a script he was directing, and the writer had a little hissy-fit. It happens, and usually it's the writer's feelings that get bruised when they're re-written (I know the feeling first hand as well, lol))
  • peter wrote: »
    there's a difference where there are scheduling conflicts, and being fired.

    And semantics: he's "difficult". When a director has a very strong vision that runs against the grain, a producer(s) will have the right to say that's not working for us. That's fair and it's part of the business. That has nothing to do with "ego". It's not as if CF had a vision for IT just to be contrarian. No, he had a vision for that story that wasn't gelling with the producers.

    It all worked out fine, and I have yet to read, or hear, of anyone slamming CF-- other than Nic Pizzolatto's bruised feelings when CF polished some of his work on TD (a common occurrence on any project; our own @ColonelSun has an interesting story where he had to clean-up a script he was directing, and the writer had a little hissy-fit. It happens, and usually it's the writer's feelings that get bruised when they're re-written (I know the feeling first hand as well, lol))

    Personally, I’m hugely encouraged that Eon went with a filmmaker who is known for their auteur sensibility.

    Since CR the series has graduated and become more filmmaker-driven. However, Danny Boyle’s hiring seemed to be the apotheosis of this momentum. He was by far the most individualistic filmmaker Eon ever tapped. It’s not all that surprising that he’d be the one to bail. I feared that in response, Eon would pick someone bland.

    Generally I can’t see Fukunaga having issues with Eon. They’re known for being fairly accommodating and supportive. Also, Fukunaga’s grim, nihilistic and atmospheric filmmaking suits Craig’s Bond. If people are right about Maniac (which I’ve yet to see), then he can also do fun entertainment.

    I think we’re on to a winner. I just hope that whatever vision he has does not clash with the powers that be.
  • edited December 2018 Posts: 4,400
    Anyone seen this short film by CJF?



    It's basically a Terence Malek-knockoff. Which is another way of saying it's a beautifully shot and ponderous short about nothing.

    It sounds and looks beautiful. If he implemented something with the scope and this kind of photography in Bond, it'll be special film.

    The music, editing and tone is also reminiscent of Christopher Nolan's style of filmmaking.

    Also, in a side note where did the 'Joji" come from?
  • ResurrectionResurrection Kolkata, India
    edited December 2018 Posts: 2,541
    Anyone seen this short film by CJF?



    It's basically a Terence Malek-knockoff. Which is another way of saying it's a beautifully shot and ponderous short about nothing.

    It sounds and looks beautiful. If he implemented something with the scope and this kind of photography in Bond, it'll be special film.

    The music, editing and tone is also reminiscent of Christopher Nolan's style of filmmaking.

    Also, in a side note where did the 'Joji" come from?

    Beautifully shot, music is really intriguing. I would say CF could be better than Nolan if it comes to action from what I have seen of his work.
  • 00Agent00Agent Any man who drinks Dom Perignon '52 can't be all bad.
    edited December 2018 Posts: 5,183
    Beautiful. I wonder if B25 will be partly shot in Africa, as Cary has some extensive experience shooting over there. Wasn't africa even rumored as a location back when Boyle was still attached?
  • jake24jake24 Sitting at your desk, kissing your lover, eating supper with your familyModerator
    Posts: 10,586
    00Agent wrote: »
    Beautiful. I wonder if B25 will be partly shot in Africa, as Cary has some extensive experience shooting over there. Wasn't africa even rumored as a location back when Boyle was still attached?
    It was reported that location scouting took place in Namibia prior to Boyle's exit.
  • 00Agent00Agent Any man who drinks Dom Perignon '52 can't be all bad.
    edited December 2018 Posts: 5,183
    jake24 wrote: »
    00Agent wrote: »
    Beautiful. I wonder if B25 will be partly shot in Africa, as Cary has some extensive experience shooting over there. Wasn't africa even rumored as a location back when Boyle was still attached?
    It was reported that location scouting took place in Namibia prior to Boyle's exit.

    Then i am all for it. If Fukunaga and Sandgren can utilize it as beautifully as in that shortfilm it would also give the movie a bit of a blank canvas for Cary to put his own stamp on the film as central Africa is an unexplored territory for Movie Bond. Except for the Introduction of Le Chiffre of course.
  • I recently tried to watch Beasts of No Nation and the only version I can find doesn’t have English subtitles.

    It looks as though the opening scenes are subbed. Is the rest English? If so, is it worth still watching?
  • jake24jake24 Sitting at your desk, kissing your lover, eating supper with your familyModerator
    Posts: 10,586
    I recently tried to watch Beasts of No Nation and the only version I can find doesn’t have English subtitles.

    It looks as though the opening scenes are subbed. Is the rest English? If so, is it worth still watching?
    90% of the dialogue is English. It is absolutely worth it. Excellent film.
  • jake24 wrote: »
    I recently tried to watch Beasts of No Nation and the only version I can find doesn’t have English subtitles.

    It looks as though the opening scenes are subbed. Is the rest English? If so, is it worth still watching?
    90% of the dialogue is English. It is absolutely worth it. Excellent film.

    @jake24 will it matter if I don't have subtitles then? Or is that 10% vital?
  • jake24jake24 Sitting at your desk, kissing your lover, eating supper with your familyModerator
    Posts: 10,586
    jake24 wrote: »
    I recently tried to watch Beasts of No Nation and the only version I can find doesn’t have English subtitles.

    It looks as though the opening scenes are subbed. Is the rest English? If so, is it worth still watching?
    90% of the dialogue is English. It is absolutely worth it. Excellent film.

    @jake24 will it matter if I don't have subtitles then? Or is that 10% vital?
    I don't even recall any scenes needing subtitles, as it's an English-language film.
  • Watch this interview from the 4 minute mark:



    Fukunaga isn't a digital fan. He only shot on the format for Beasts due to technical and practical reasons. The fact that Sandgren has only ever shot film - convinces me that despite reports Bond 25 will be shot on film.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 7,965
    Watch this interview from the 4 minute mark:



    Fukunaga isn't a digital fan. He only shot on the format for Beasts due to technical and practical reasons. The fact that Sandgren has only ever shot film - convinces me that despite reports Bond 25 will be shot on film.

    I think they'll utilise both formats, personally.
  • Posts: 4,400
    I got around to re-watching Beasts of No Nation last night. This is the film that was not only written and directed by Fukunaga, but also something he served as his own DP on, operated camera and produced. Which is a fairly mighty accomplishment (full-fat-Fukunaga, if you will).

    I had seen the film before. However I wasn’t quite prepared for quite how visceral an experience I’d have watching it again. I’ve seen a lot of movies recently but nothing has really impacted me quite as profoundly as Beasts for quite a while. I was genuinely shocked, pained and broken by the end. It certainly got a tear out of me. The story feels both completely real and completely abstract.

    beasts-of-no-nation.jpg?imwidth=1240

    Fukunaga has made an uncompromising film that leads us through a cycle of violence in which childhood is buried and kids are traumatically reborn as child soldiers. The opening act is a charming set-up for the horrors that are to follow.

    Soon Agu's indoctrination as a child-solider begins. There is such an arresting juxtaposition to seeing such a young child holding a gun. However, the film musicianly creates a persuade argument why young men find this life alluring. They feel they have no choice and soon a sense of family and community develops around them. They go through ritualistic training and find purpose within the battalion. Not only are they stronger together but they feel valued. These are boys who have suddenly been given power shortly before they had none. It’s oddly understandable why Agu feels welcomed into his new violent, murderous family as they oddly offer genuine warmth and affection. This eventually leads to the heartbreaking and unwatchable scene where Agu kills a man in cold blood. It’s punishing cinema.

    As the film progresses, an almost hallucinatory and intoxicating feel begins to take hold. A delirium and horror soon sets in as we fall down the rabbit hold of Agu’s new life, with the mood and atmosphere of the piece takes the shape of a living nightmare with an element of Coppola’s Apocalypse Now.

    Idris Elba is terrific in the film (he was criminally snubbed for the Academy Award nomination). He has a terrifying aura of leadership where is can be scary and inspiring. He’s charismatic and his powerful rhetoric even stirred me. Elba's commandeering frame and paternal warmth makes the character more layered than your typical “screen villain”. There is a dark undercurrent and vulgarity to the character as he preys on these young men at an impressionable age. Nonetheless, Elba still brings pathos and charm to a densely written role.



    However, the real soul of this film belongs to Abraham Attah. It’s a pulverising performance laden with empathy. I felt very attached to him and concerned throughout for his wellbeing.

    Fukunaga shoots the film in glorious widescreen and there is a luscious quality to the visuals. Rarely does he indulge in overly showy techniques, instead choosing to occupy the frame with numerous characters and details in wide-angles. This is a meticulously designed film demonstrating that Fukunaga is an observant and unintrusive filmmaker with a journalistic interest. There is a brilliant long Steadicam shot (rivalling his work in True Detective) which is close to perfect. It encompasses both story, character and theme and has numerous punishing moments.This is complemented by numerous brilliant shots throughout.

    Whilst dealing with a hotbed of socio-political issues, this film is a character study rather than a topical drama. You are Agu and his transformation into a killer takes a faceless issue and makes us live it. The movie itself is an effective nightmare, and a confident piece of filmmaking by Fukunaga. This is a painful, crushing film.

    It gets the full 5 stars from me.

    ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐
  • 00Agent00Agent Any man who drinks Dom Perignon '52 can't be all bad.
    edited March 2019 Posts: 5,183
    Great Review @Pierce2Daniel your feelings mirror my own when i first watched the movie a couple month ago. I was absolutely amazed by the intensity, and the willingness of Fukunaga to "go there". That movie is completely uncompromissing in every way and stayed with me for quite a while afterwards. Watching it feels like you are expiriencing a trauma, which i think was the intention.

    Also the soundtrack is out of this world and really helps elevate the whole expirience to something never seen before.
  • Posts: 4,400
    00Agent wrote: »
    Great Review @Pierce2Daniel your feelings mirror my own when i first watched the movie a couple month ago. I was absolutely amazed by the intensity, and the willingness of Fukunaga to "go there". That movie is completely uncompromissing in every way and stayed with me for quite a while afterwards. Watching it feels like you are expiriencing a trauma, which i think was the intention.

    Also the soundtrack is out of this world and really helps elevate the whole expirience to something never seen before.

    Thank you. It's a deeply impactful film. some of the images are so stirring. I keep thinking about the moment where a young boy realised he has been shot and you see the bullet hole on his side. It's haunting and unforgettable.

    Fukunaga doesn't shy away from these moments nor does he sensationalise them. There is a matter-of-fact way to his execution of the scenes. He also doesn't go with neat conclusions at the end. It's a tough and necessary watch.

    Also, his photography is crisp, bright and lush. He never gives in to the shaky cam nonsense you'd expect from an "indie" made at this scale on this subject. The action feels cinematic and it never sacrifices the verisimilitude of the piece.

    tumblr_nwcizp2fsP1qa0f7co9_500.jpg

    3d9037ce296679f0d93a251cad1c203a.jpg

  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded the Ballrooms of Mars
    edited March 2019 Posts: 12,459
    Great to read. I won't watch this film as I don't want to go through that (just my choice). But I had heard that Idris was amazing in this. I did not realize Cary was his own DP. He is truly multi-talented and we are lucky to have him for Bond 25.

    I hope he puts that zeal and detailed focus into this Bond film. He will have different constraints for sure. But I also can see why it would appeal to him to do a Bond film - it is a different kind of challenge and a way to stretch for himself creatively, professionally. Of all the factors concerning Bond 25, I am most happy and confident in Cary Fukunaga being the director.

    I hope he gets the film on screen that he really wants to make, because I don't feel that would be anything too off base from what EON would like. Anyway, I'm more intrigued than ever to see what Cary can do - story wise and visually.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,327
    So far, SIN NOMBRE and JANE EYRE were very good, in my opinion. I'll be seeing BEASTS OF NO NATION very soon, but I feel like I need to find "the right moment", given how disturbing the film is said to be.
  • jake24jake24 Sitting at your desk, kissing your lover, eating supper with your familyModerator
    Posts: 10,586
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    So far, SIN NOMBRE and JANE EYRE were very good, in my opinion. I'll be seeing BEASTS OF NO NATION very soon, but I feel like I need to find "the right moment", given how disturbing the film is said to be.
    You're in for a treat with Beasts. There are two or three disturbing moments, but the film is really gorgeous as a whole.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,327
    jake24 wrote: »
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    So far, SIN NOMBRE and JANE EYRE were very good, in my opinion. I'll be seeing BEASTS OF NO NATION very soon, but I feel like I need to find "the right moment", given how disturbing the film is said to be.
    You're in for a treat with Beasts. There are two or three disturbing moments, but the film is really gorgeous as a whole.

    Thanks! I don't know what to expect to be honest. ;-)
  • jake24jake24 Sitting at your desk, kissing your lover, eating supper with your familyModerator
    edited July 2019 Posts: 10,586
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    jake24 wrote: »
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    So far, SIN NOMBRE and JANE EYRE were very good, in my opinion. I'll be seeing BEASTS OF NO NATION very soon, but I feel like I need to find "the right moment", given how disturbing the film is said to be.
    You're in for a treat with Beasts. There are two or three disturbing moments, but the film is really gorgeous as a whole.

    Thanks! I don't know what to expect to be honest. ;-)
    Have you seen True Detective S1 yet? That's another must-see from Fukunaga.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,327
    No, not yet. I'm currently watching THE NEWSROOM and after that I'm forced to watch STRANGER THINGS and after that I'm forced, in the name of unconditional love, to watch PRETTY LITTLE LIARS (*sigh*), so I'm not at TD by a long shot. ;-)
  • jake24jake24 Sitting at your desk, kissing your lover, eating supper with your familyModerator
    Posts: 10,586
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    No, not yet. I'm currently watching THE NEWSROOM and after that I'm forced to watch STRANGER THINGS and after that I'm forced, in the name of unconditional love, to watch PRETTY LITTLE LIARS (*sigh*), so I'm not at TD by a long shot. ;-)
    Oh God, I don't envy that.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,327
    jake24 wrote: »
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    No, not yet. I'm currently watching THE NEWSROOM and after that I'm forced to watch STRANGER THINGS and after that I'm forced, in the name of unconditional love, to watch PRETTY LITTLE LIARS (*sigh*), so I'm not at TD by a long shot. ;-)
    Oh God, I don't envy that.

    You have no idea how insistent the girlfriend is about PLL. I'll see if I can squeeze TD in somewhere. ;-) Only 24 episodes after all.
  • ResurrectionResurrection Kolkata, India
    edited July 2019 Posts: 2,541
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    No, not yet. I'm currently watching THE NEWSROOM and after that I'm forced to watch STRANGER THINGS and after that I'm forced, in the name of unconditional love, to watch PRETTY LITTLE LIARS (*sigh*), so I'm not at TD by a long shot. ;-)

    :)) I tried to watch PLL with my GF once, slept half way through... Enjoy yourself @DarthDimi it's far more disturbing than BONN but in a different way if you know what I mean ;)
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,327
    I'm scared now. 😊
  • Posts: 12,210
    I saw Jane Eyre last week which I liked a lot! Everything felt very natural and it made me confident about Fukunaga's style.
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded the Ballrooms of Mars
    Posts: 12,459
    OMG, you have not seen True Detective yet? You are in for a major treat. It is outstanding. I bought the dvd, which I normally would not do for that genre. Cinematography is fantastic (no exaggeration), and Cary is an amazing storyteller.
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