NO TIME TO DIE (2021) - Critical Reaction and Box Office Performance

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Comments

  • KenAustinKenAustin United States
    Posts: 226
    Creasy47 wrote: »
    Theater trips just aren't worth the time, money and energy for me anymore. I'll rarely go for the absolute must see films, but considering just how lightning fast the theater-to-digital/physical turnaround is these days, I don't mind waiting a few weeks/a couple of months to experience most films.

    I'm with you there...My TV is big enough, and the surround sound is good enough to give me the experience I want most of the time...an occasional theater trip is nice as long as there isn't a lot of outside interference from disrespectful kids...which isn't often
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,642
    I just think you're all turning into old farts. 😉
    Just joking, of course. To be honest, I rarely have a bad theatrical experience. When someone's noisy, I tend to ask to please keep it down and that usually works. Also, talking to a lot of kids as I tend to do, they are far from the dumb ADHD crowd some here seem to think. You would be surprised how critically and intelligently several of my 17 year old students analyzed F9 and other youth oriented films last year. Don't worry, they are getting there too, to becoming old farts like us. 😉

    Lastly, tradition is overrated. Every generation has its own ways and calls the next one out on their lack of respect for their "traditions". That's simply the eternal cycle of generations replacing the former while being replaced by the latter. Remember when we were told to shut up by "old people"? Thing is, I love watching movies in the theatre, I still do, and interference from disrespectful kids? -- hardly. More from middle-aged women chatting the place up about their dogs, kids, husbands and coworkers.

    Incidentally, NTTD clearly wasn't catering to the wee ones.
  • KenAustinKenAustin United States
    Posts: 226
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    I just think you're all turning into old farts. 😉
    Just joking, of course. To be honest, I rarely have a bad theatrical experience. When someone's noisy, I tend to ask to please keep it down and that usually works. Also, talking to a lot of kids as I tend to do, they are far from the dumb ADHD crowd some here seem to think. You would be surprised how critically and intelligently several of my 17 year old students analyzed F9 and other youth oriented films last year. Don't worry, they are getting there too, to becoming old farts like us. 😉

    Lastly, tradition is overrated. Every generation has its own ways and calls the next one out on their lack of respect for their "traditions". That's simply the eternal cycle of generations replacing the former while being replaced by the latter. Remember when we were told to shut up by "old people"? Thing is, I love watching movies in the theatre, I still do, and interference from disrespectful kids? -- hardly. More from middle-aged women chatting the place up about their dogs, kids, husbands and coworkers.

    Incidentally, NTTD clearly wasn't catering to the wee ones.

    I used to moonlight in a theater as a projectionist while stationed in Germany some time ago, and I remember distinctly having to kick several people out for being noisy and disrespectful during the showing of Revenge of the Sith...so now when one or two people act out while a movie is playing it jumps right out at me, maybe I'm a little too sensitive to it...I know plenty of younger folks that are in tune and are very intelligent with things like movie reviews, but there are plenty who are also not, nature of the beast, I suppose timing is everything. Maybe later viewings might be a better route if I venture forth to see a movie.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,642
    KenAustin wrote: »
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    I just think you're all turning into old farts. 😉
    Just joking, of course. To be honest, I rarely have a bad theatrical experience. When someone's noisy, I tend to ask to please keep it down and that usually works. Also, talking to a lot of kids as I tend to do, they are far from the dumb ADHD crowd some here seem to think. You would be surprised how critically and intelligently several of my 17 year old students analyzed F9 and other youth oriented films last year. Don't worry, they are getting there too, to becoming old farts like us. 😉

    Lastly, tradition is overrated. Every generation has its own ways and calls the next one out on their lack of respect for their "traditions". That's simply the eternal cycle of generations replacing the former while being replaced by the latter. Remember when we were told to shut up by "old people"? Thing is, I love watching movies in the theatre, I still do, and interference from disrespectful kids? -- hardly. More from middle-aged women chatting the place up about their dogs, kids, husbands and coworkers.

    Incidentally, NTTD clearly wasn't catering to the wee ones.

    I used to moonlight in a theater as a projectionist while stationed in Germany some time ago, and I remember distinctly having to kick several people out for being noisy and disrespectful during the showing of Revenge of the Sith...so now when one or two people act out while a movie is playing it jumps right out at me, maybe I'm a little too sensitive to it...I know plenty of younger folks that are in tune and are very intelligent with things like movie reviews, but there are plenty who are also not, nature of the beast, I suppose timing is everything. Maybe later viewings might be a better route if I venture forth to see a movie.

    I tend to pick second or third week showings anyway, if for no other reason than to avoid overcrowded rooms. I just don't like being squeezed between people. I do make the occasional opening night exception, though. Star Wars, Bond, anything DC, ... 😉
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 40,578
    I've had too many theatrical outings that end up ruining my experience in other ways. I remember seeing IT: Chapter Two in theaters and some moron next to me giggled at literally every single instance that remotely exuded tension or scares or what have you, every damn time. I wasn't crazy about the film in the end anyway but I can't help but wonder how my first viewing would've fared had I seen it alone, without someone chuckling in my ear every couple of minutes.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,029
    I think that was me.

    :))

    Just kidding, I skipped CHAPTER TWO. I’m the worst person to take to a horror film because none of them ever feel terrifying and I just end up either laughing at how silly it all is or I get incredibly bored. There’s few exceptions, like DOCTOR SLEEP where I’m more stunned that the filmmakers actually went there concerning a baseball boy.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 40,578
    I think that was me.

    :))

    Just kidding, I skipped CHAPTER TWO. I’m the worst person to take to a horror film because none of them ever feel terrifying and I just end up either laughing at how silly it all is or I get incredibly bored. There’s few exceptions, like DOCTOR SLEEP where I’m more stunned that the filmmakers actually went there concerning a baseball boy.

    It must've been your long lost cousin, then. I knew it.

    I mostly avoid them in theaters just because how loud everyone gets, to the point that I miss key dialogue and stuff because the screams and laughter are endless (though I did see Doctor Sleep in theaters thankfully and loved it).
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,642
    All of my NTTD viewings were with a well-behaving crowd, and I went to two different theatres. Then again, we're not the most extraverted lot in Flanders anyway.

    SF was one of those rare cases in my experience where a few idiots in the back were ruining it for all of us. They were removed by the stewards about halfway through the movie, but because of them, I'd had a big problem resonating with the film. I too wonder sometimes if SF might be sitting better with me right now if my virgin viewing of the film hadn't been intruded upon by some rude people. I did go back, though, and had a great experience the second time. But that first viewing... well, we all know how big a deal that is, don't we?
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,029
    I remember on my first viewing of SP, just as Bond was about to crash his plane through the log cabin, some bozo took his phone out and decided to take a photo of the screen with the flash on.
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 7,527
    I remember on my first viewing of SP, just as Bond was about to crash his plane through the log cabin, some bozo took his phone out and decided to take a photo of the screen with the flash on.

    Lol, the theatre experience is quickly going in the same direction as that plane, IMO.
  • KenAustinKenAustin United States
    Posts: 226
    I remember on my first viewing of SP, just as Bond was about to crash his plane through the log cabin, some bozo took his phone out and decided to take a photo of the screen with the flash on.

    Lol, the theatre experience is quickly going in the same direction as that plane, IMO.

    Just waiting for the 100+ inch flat screen TVs to hit the market LOL
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 7,527
    KenAustin wrote: »
    I remember on my first viewing of SP, just as Bond was about to crash his plane through the log cabin, some bozo took his phone out and decided to take a photo of the screen with the flash on.

    Lol, the theatre experience is quickly going in the same direction as that plane, IMO.

    Just waiting for the 100+ inch flat screen TVs to hit the market LOL

    I hear you, but for the distance you’re sitting, does it really need to be that big?

    Also you could invest in a great projector and go even bigger. Personally I feel like I’ll always prefer a TV though n
  • KenAustinKenAustin United States
    Posts: 226
    KenAustin wrote: »
    I remember on my first viewing of SP, just as Bond was about to crash his plane through the log cabin, some bozo took his phone out and decided to take a photo of the screen with the flash on.

    Lol, the theatre experience is quickly going in the same direction as that plane, IMO.

    Just waiting for the 100+ inch flat screen TVs to hit the market LOL

    I hear you, but for the distance you’re sitting, does it really need to be that big?

    Also you could invest in a great projector and go even bigger. Personally I feel like I’ll always prefer a TV though n

    I'm ridiculous like that...I need about a 100 - 120in TV easily just to fit the entire wall space between the windows in my living room, and unless Bond seems like he is in the room with me I am missing out on the experience LOL
  • I remember on my first viewing of SP, just as Bond was about to crash his plane through the log cabin, some bozo took his phone out and decided to take a photo of the screen with the flash on.

    Lol that's crazy. Why do some people behave like this? I've seen some people come into a movie and they're on their phone the entire time with the light from their screen causing a huge distraction. Interestingly enough it's mostly women I see do this.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    edited January 2022 Posts: 23,642
    Then again, isn't the interaction of an audience with the film sometimes part of the fun? My viewing of Iron Man 2 was actually made a lot more pleasant by a guy who had all sorts of clever responses ready to stupid oneliners. The whole room laughed; we had tears in our eyes. I still enjoy the film because it reminds me of the good time we all had. But I agree, there are films that demand absolute silence from an audience.

    Still, I love the whole theatre experience. The smell, the big room and big screen; the loudness of the film, the vibration of the seats when explosions happen, just the whole place. I also love the "imperfections" in the visual quality sometimes, against the cleaned-up version we watch at home on our super-HD television screens. This is part of the reason why I have gone to the theatre for old movies I had seen countless times already. There's a difference between watching E.T., Blade Runner, The Shining, Invasion Of The Body Snatchers (1978), A Clockwork Orange, Back To The Future, Casablanca, ... in the theatre versus at home. In fact, in 2015, I first worked my way through all five versions of Blade Runner I have at home, and then found out that my local theatre was showing the Final Cut the next week. I went, of course, and yes, it really was a different experience.

    Lastly, my local theatre has a 'VIP' room. You pay a little extra, but then you can sit in a room just as big as the others, but with only 50 extremely comfortable twin seats in them, like flying 'business'. You can order food and drinks during the film. You just have to take the film they're showing that day, but that's usually one of the hot fresh releases, like Bond. And because a VIP ticket is more expensive, most people willing to pay for it, like myself, are there for enjoying the film, not for ruining it for everyone else. ;-)
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,029
    This was a rare occasion.

    Funnily, this was at the designated VIP section where you pay for more luxury.
  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 40,578
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    Then again, isn't the interaction of an audience with the film sometimes part of the fun? My viewing of Iron Man 2 was actually made a lot more pleasant by a guy who had all sorts of clever responses ready to stupid oneliners. The whole room laughed; we had tears in our eyes. I still enjoy the film because it reminds me of the good time we all had. But I agree, there are films that demand absolute silence from an audience.

    Still, I love the whole theatre experience. The smell, the big room and big screen; the loudness of the film, the vibration of the seats when explosions happen, just the whole place.

    Lastly, my local theatre has a 'VIP' room. You pay a little extra, but then you can sit in a room just as big as the others, but with only 50 extremely comfortable twin seats in them, like flying 'business'. You can order food and drinks during the film. You just have to take the film they're showing that day, but that's usually one of the hot fresh releases, Bond included. And because a VIP ticket is more expensive, most people willing to pay for it, like myself, are there for enjoying the film, not for ruining it for everyone else. ;-)

    I've sadly not had such positive reactions in so long. I can't remember the last time I saw a film opening night that ended with applause.


    I do remember seeing the likes of The Dark Knight and SF at the midnight release with people cheering and applauding throughout. That was atmospheric and fun. Lately, though, my experiences have been much more negative and irritating.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,642
    Creasy47 wrote: »
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    Then again, isn't the interaction of an audience with the film sometimes part of the fun? My viewing of Iron Man 2 was actually made a lot more pleasant by a guy who had all sorts of clever responses ready to stupid oneliners. The whole room laughed; we had tears in our eyes. I still enjoy the film because it reminds me of the good time we all had. But I agree, there are films that demand absolute silence from an audience.

    Still, I love the whole theatre experience. The smell, the big room and big screen; the loudness of the film, the vibration of the seats when explosions happen, just the whole place.

    Lastly, my local theatre has a 'VIP' room. You pay a little extra, but then you can sit in a room just as big as the others, but with only 50 extremely comfortable twin seats in them, like flying 'business'. You can order food and drinks during the film. You just have to take the film they're showing that day, but that's usually one of the hot fresh releases, Bond included. And because a VIP ticket is more expensive, most people willing to pay for it, like myself, are there for enjoying the film, not for ruining it for everyone else. ;-)

    I've sadly not had such positive reactions in so long. I can't remember the last time I saw a film opening night that ended with applause.


    I do remember seeing the likes of The Dark Knight and SF at the midnight release with people cheering and applauding throughout. That was atmospheric and fun. Lately, though, my experiences have been much more negative and irritating.

    I'm sorry to read this, @Creasy47. Nothing beats a good theatrical experience.
  • matt_umatt_u better known as Mr. Roark
    edited January 2022 Posts: 4,343
    My personal experience on day one for NTTD was great. Cheering and applauding at both the gun barrel and the very end… but throughout the film there was total silence (except for some well deserved laughs at the comedic bits).

    The best thing tho was seeing a fully packed theater after all that time, a first time since December 2019. For Bond.
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    edited January 2022 Posts: 2,644
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    Then again, isn't the interaction of an audience with the film sometimes part of the fun? My viewing of Iron Man 2 was actually made a lot more pleasant by a guy who had all sorts of clever responses ready to stupid oneliners. The whole room laughed; we had tears in our eyes. I still enjoy the film because it reminds me of the good time we all had.

    The potential of audience interaction is among the primary factors in determining whether I will go to see a film or not. I really don't want to sit there with just two other people. For example, if I go see "Nightmare Alley" at this point, that's what will happen.
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    Still, I love the whole theatre experience. The smell, the big room and big screen; the loudness of the film, the vibration of the seats when explosions happen, just the whole place. I also love the "imperfections" in the visual quality sometimes, against the cleaned-up version we watch at home on our super-HD television screens. This is part of the reason why I have gone to the theatre for old movies I had seen countless times already. There's a difference between watching E.T., Blade Runner, The Shining, Invasion Of The Body Snatchers (1978), A Clockwork Orange, Back To The Future, Casablanca, ... in the theatre versus at home. In fact, in 2015, I first worked my way through all five versions of Blade Runner I have at home, and then found out that my local theatre was showing the Final Cut the next week. I went, of course, and yes, it really was a different experience.

    You could really start a dedicated (and very passionate) thread to discuss the issues that many of us have with the movie going experience, and - more generally - the future of theater attendance as it relates to demographics (i.e., age) and film offerings.

    For the most part, I’ve been pretty lucky with some of the issues posted here (noisy kids, people on cellphones, etc..). Of course, I tend to go see movies that skew older so some of these concerns are diminished. In fact, the things that I really HATE about going to the movies these days are the endless coming attractions / advertisements and the overly long run times of the typical movie. To be fair, however, these issues have only become more important as I’ve gotten older, but they have become a major dis-incentive to visit the local multiplex with any kind of regularity. And as I’ve gotten older my personal threshold for attending a movie screening has only gotten higher.

    A threshold that now depends on three things:
    1. A movie that I already know I’m going to love (and have most likely have already seen). It sounds illogical, but watching a classic era film noir or a seeing an old favorite on the big screen (‘In a Lonely Place’ and ‘Gojira’, are two recent examples for me), still works as a night out.
    2. Movies which – by their very nature – are best seen on the large screen. Think ‘2OO1’ or ‘Lawrence of Arabia.’ Long? But yeah, there are intermissions
    3. A film that I want to patronize out of loyalty to the franchise (Bond) or an historical documentary that really piques my interest (“Apollo 11”, “Amazing Grace” from 2019, for example). And, yes, I will be going to the IMAX screening of “Get Back” in a few weeks!!!!

    I think, that in a larger sense, since I'm not into Superheroes, Sci-Fi or animated children’s fare, there doesn’t seem to be a lot out there for me. (Queue the “get off my lawn” eye-rolls).

    Now, of course, it could be a case of cause and effect. The top two movies in the US at the moment are Sing 2 and Spiderman, while two of the more talked about ‘adult’ alternatives (“West Side Story” and” Nightmare Alley”) tanked big time. If this trend continues, even fewer ‘midrange’ films will be released to theaters in the future – and most will go straight to streaming platforms. Thus, many of us will find even fewer chances to support cinemas. In fact, when viewed in context, NTTD’s US performance was actually ‘not that bad’.

    Yep. I'm officially an old man now!!!! :))
  • VenutiusVenutius Yorkshire
    edited January 2022 Posts: 2,948
    Craig's Bond movies are the only things I've seen in cinemas this century. Not even kidding. I hate going to the cinema - they have those 'people' things in them! I don't even like watching films at home unless I'm on my own. Eh? No, I'm not an anti-social loner type, what makes you say that? ;)
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    edited January 2022 Posts: 7,527
    Venutius wrote: »
    Craig's Bond movies are the only things I've seen in cinemas this century. Not even kidding. I hate going to the cinema - they have those 'people' things in them! I don't even like watching films at home unless I'm on my own. Eh? No, I'm not an anti-social loner type, what makes you say that? ;)

    I'm honestly with you here. I've been to more than just Bond films, but it's an increasingly negative experience.

    Filmmakers always say that cinemas are important because of the group experience you have with your fellow moviegoers... I'd love to have one of these positive experiences.
  • VenutiusVenutius Yorkshire
    edited January 2022 Posts: 2,948
    Exactly - knowing what they're almost invariably like, a group experience with fellow moviegoers is precisely what I don't want! :))
  • Posts: 6,883
    Its a lot different these days (Old man speaking now!!) But I have vivid memories of movies in the cinema where the audience were an added bonus...Aliens, The Untouchables, Robicop, Conan The Barbarian, Mad Max/Max 2 double bill, to name a few, enhanced my enjoyment with the crowd buzzing with excitement. Regards Bond, the Moore movies got warmer resction ( or maybe it was the Summer release!) And Craigs debut got a great reaction from the crowd, particularly that final scene!
  • edited January 2022 Posts: 1,314
    I really find performative audience reaction in a cinema irritating. Whooping and cheering. It’s like a kid at the circus. Try going to a marvel film. There’s always some nerd who loudly proclaims about what’s on screen.

    That said I remember going to see “last crusade” back in 89 in a matinee as a kid and it was like a holding pen. Absolute chaos throughout 😂😂

  • Posts: 1,314
    And seconds on the projector idea. We bought one recently. It’s amazing and only £80. Highly recommended. Basically the same price as two family trips to the cinema.
  • KenAustinKenAustin United States
    Posts: 226
    Venutius wrote: »
    Craig's Bond movies are the only things I've seen in cinemas this century. Not even kidding. I hate going to the cinema - they have those 'people' things in them! I don't even like watching films at home unless I'm on my own. Eh? No, I'm not an anti-social loner type, what makes you say that? ;)

    I'm pretty much the same way. When the wife and kid leave the house I race down the stairs like a kid at Christmas to slam a DVD in the player. I can easily count on both hands how many times I've been to the theater in the last 10 years. One of the first things that annoys me is the lack of attention for starters, get off of your phone, tell the ticket agent what movie and time you want to buy a ticket for and then get your a$$ through the snack line ASAP so those of us whose parents didn't drop us off to get us out of their hair for two hours can get our favorite seats and watch the previews before the film starts (LOL). Next, there is no reason we need an usher to come in and remind your remedial brains to turn off your cell phones or else, you should already know that. Next, don't turn and ask me any questions, just STFU enjoy the film and clap when it ends...and...finally when the movie ends get TF out of the way so normal people can get to their vehicles and go home at a reasonable pace. Some of us want to revel in what we just saw when we get home, and maybe grab some booze and re-watch the previous film before passing out in preparation of dealing with tomorrow. (LOL)
  • Yeah, cinema going just isn't the same wow factor anymore. People yapping, looking at mobile, making noise with sweet wrappers etc. I wish you could just watch films on your own with friends/family.
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,644
    Yeah, cinema going just isn't the same wow factor anymore. People yapping, looking at mobile, making noise with sweet wrappers etc. I wish you could just watch films on your own with friends/family.

    You can actually. Some cinemas offer "private screening" for a price. You should ask the manager at your movie house if they offer this. Here in the US, it normally works out to a about $200 USD or so. But if you divide that by 10 friends or so.........
  • Last_Rat_StandingLast_Rat_Standing Long Neck Ice Cold Beer Never Broke My Heart
    Posts: 4,444
    Dwayne wrote: »
    Yeah, cinema going just isn't the same wow factor anymore. People yapping, looking at mobile, making noise with sweet wrappers etc. I wish you could just watch films on your own with friends/family.

    You can actually. Some cinemas offer "private screening" for a price. You should ask the manager at your movie house if they offer this. Here in the US, it normally works out to a about $200 USD or so. But if you divide that by 10 friends or so.........

    I had a private screening for Matrix 4. Not that I had to pay extra, no one else was at that particular showing. It was beautiful
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