Roger Moore on What's My Line?, 1971

He's the mystery guest in this installment from the syndicated version that was telecast from 1968 to 1975. (Sean Connery appeared in 1965 on the CBS version that ran from 1950 to 1967.) The mystery guest segment begins at the 15:56 mark.


Comments

  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    Posts: 23,883
    It was great to see both of those episodes. Thanks for posting them.

    It's interesting how the fashion changed so dramatically in a reasonably short space of time.
  • ClarkDevlinClarkDevlin Martinis, Girls and Guns
    Posts: 15,423
    Roger is always charismatic. You just can’t help but love the man. Rest his soul.
  • Fire_and_Ice_ReturnsFire_and_Ice_Returns I am trying to get away from this mountan!
    Posts: 23,265
    I watched the Connery What's my Line recently though I never seen the Moore episode will give it a watch later for sure.
  • bondjames wrote: »
    It was great to see both of those episodes. Thanks for posting them.

    It's interesting how the fashion changed so dramatically in a reasonably short space of time.

    The original 1950-67 version of What's My Line? mostly featured formal clothing (the host and the male panelists wearing tuxedos or suits that could pass for tuxedos) and the women panelists wearing evening dresses.

    The 1968-75 version opted for an informal style. Even the name plates had the first name of the panelists ("Arlene" instead of "Miss Francis," as in the original).
  • bondjamesbondjames You were expecting someone else?
    edited January 2018 Posts: 23,883
    bondjames wrote: »
    It was great to see both of those episodes. Thanks for posting them.

    It's interesting how the fashion changed so dramatically in a reasonably short space of time.

    The original 1950-67 version of What's My Line? mostly featured formal clothing (the host and the male panelists wearing tuxedos or suits that could pass for tuxedos) and the women panelists wearing evening dresses.

    The 1968-75 version opted for an informal style. Even the name plates had the first name of the panelists ("Arlene" instead of "Miss Francis," as in the original).
    I see, that explains it. Got to love those loud flowery patterns on the dresses, which remind me very much of the DAF/LALD era.
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