007: What would you have done differently?

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  • Posts: 12,081
    I love the claustrophobic feel of both DN and FRWL so would definitely NOT change that.
  • WalecsWalecs On Her Majesty's Secret Service
    Posts: 2,209
    Milovy wrote: »
    Is that Monty Norman music, or the John Barry additions to the DR. NO score? I ask because I don't think Norman was credited for anything more than the specific James Bond Theme. And likely over-credited. So to me it's a clue to how much Barry contributed in the first film. But yeah, it is garish in comparison.
    I am pretty sure the music used at the end of the boat chase (also used in Dr. No) is some stock music taken from a library. Not composed by Norman or Barry. Although... parts of it do sound a lot like the Bond theme. So I might be wrong. I don't have a source on hand at the moment for this. Does anyone know about this?

    The music played during the helicopter and the boat chases is called "Death of Dr. No" and was composed by Monty Norman for Bond and Dr. No fight at the end of the movie. It is clearly based on the Bond theme and a couple of motifs Norman wrote for Dr. No, so I see no mysteries here.
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    Posts: 3,417
    Walecs wrote: »
    Milovy wrote: »
    Is that Monty Norman music, or the John Barry additions to the DR. NO score? I ask because I don't think Norman was credited for anything more than the specific James Bond Theme. And likely over-credited. So to me it's a clue to how much Barry contributed in the first film. But yeah, it is garish in comparison.
    I am pretty sure the music used at the end of the boat chase (also used in Dr. No) is some stock music taken from a library. Not composed by Norman or Barry. Although... parts of it do sound a lot like the Bond theme. So I might be wrong. I don't have a source on hand at the moment for this. Does anyone know about this?

    The music played during the helicopter and the boat chases is called "Death of Dr. No" and was composed by Monty Norman for Bond and Dr. No fight at the end of the movie. It is clearly based on the Bond theme and a couple of motifs Norman wrote for Dr. No, so I see no mysteries here.

    That music doesn't bother me. In a way, it is a glimpse of what a series of 1950s Bond movies would sound like.
  • Lancaster007Lancaster007 Shrublands Health Clinic, England
    Posts: 1,865
    2 tiny things but I hate Bond's wave goodbye to the film at the end. Just looks totally rubbish. Plus there is a strange cut around that point that is noticeable by the jump in the soundtrack. Out of place with the rest of the film. Oh yes, and the whole rear projection of that whole scene

    They had to cut a risqué line of dialogue (for the time for a family film), shame that the original film elements couldn't have been found and reinstated for the blu-ray master. Probably wouldn't even raise an eyebrow these days!
  • Posts: 2,469
    Am I the only one who loves the boat chase? Its culmination reminds me very much of my favourite Jules Verne novel Michel Strogoff.

    I think it gets too much of a bad rap. It's far from being the greatest Bond action sequence, but it's quite good on the whole.
  • RichardTheBruceRichardTheBruce I'm motivated by my Duty.
    Posts: 4,879
    Walecs wrote: »
    Is that Monty Norman music, or the John Barry additions to the DR. NO score? I ask because I don't think Norman was credited for anything more than the specific James Bond Theme. And likely over-credited. So to me it's a clue to how much Barry contributed in the first film. But yeah, it is garish in comparison.
    The music played during the helicopter and the boat chases is called "Death of Dr. No" and was composed by Monty Norman for Bond and Dr. No fight at the end of the movie. It is clearly based on the Bond theme and a couple of motifs Norman wrote for Dr. No, so I see no mysteries here.
    Yes, I'm admittedly biased and I'm questioning Monty Norman's credit for the action-related music in DR. NO. Pop songs, yes. Thrills and suspense, no.

    To me it's an indicator that the same musical piece credited to Norman in DR. NO can be used in the Barry-scored FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE without notice. Norman is credited for "The James Bond Theme"---and once again I think Barry likely had more to do with it. I'm aware of the "Good Sign, Bad Sign" and "Bee's Knees" possibilities. I side against the court ruling.
  • I've loved hearing what you guys have had to say about FRWL. Now, I've given this film a bit longer because you guys had a lot of opinions but now I think it's time we moved on to GOLDFINGER.

    Goldfinger-7.jpg

    Again, this is your chance to say whatever you would have differently wit the film, so things like; plot change, character additions or subtractions. Anything you like. People will be given the chance to give their responses within 7 DAYS from today (this may change so let me know if you want me to extend the time for longer) until the discussion moves on to the next James Bond film. This will run until we reach SKYFALL as a discussion for SPECTRE already exists.

    Looking forward to hearing what you guys think.
  • edited June 2017 Posts: 337
    Not much. This is Connery's best film IMO and the blueprint of the Bond films since it was the one that fully fleshed out of the 007 formula. It's the basis of some of my other favourite movies like TSWLM. I guess the action is a bit watered down compared to FRWL and it might feel slightly padded in the middle at times, but I can't really complain about too much other than that. A classic.

    And the death via gassing scene could look a little more convincing, lol. Just a little.
  • RC7RC7
    Posts: 9,859
    Nothing. It's a classic. Flaws and all.
  • TheWizardOfIceTheWizardOfIce 'One of the Internet's more toxic individuals'
    Posts: 9,117
    Paging Guy Hamilton: Film. People. Falling. Over. Unconscious. Convincingly.

    Utterly embarrassing sequence.
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    Posts: 3,417
    Take out the "Man talk" slap and the Beatles line. The rest is excellent.
  • Posts: 219
    Paging Guy Hamilton: Film. People. Falling. Over. Unconscious. Convincingly.

    Utterly embarrassing sequence.

    Which gassing scene?

    Gassing the gangster bosses - maybe could be better, but no big deal

    Gassing the Fort Knox garrison - absolutely not, they are soldiers ordered to pretend to be gassed, with a few hours notice and therefore no time to practice. Only had to fool planes flying overhead. Thought it was perfect.
  • Posts: 219
    Not much. This is Connery's best film IMO and the blueprint of the Bond films since it was the one that fully fleshed out of the 007 formula. It's the basis of some of my other favourite movies like TSWLM. I guess the action is a bit watered down compared to FRWL and it might feel slightly padded in the middle at times, but I can't really complain about too much other than that. A classic.

    Agreed.

    Not thought this through, but reckon Goldfinger is referenced by virtually all the following films


  • edited June 2017 Posts: 1,162
    It made Bond immortal. It's that simple. I still would prefer him not wearing that kinky baby blue something .
  • Posts: 9,859
    The whole Kentucky part is a bit boring at times. If the plot could have included a bit more of Bond actually doing something, other than being an annoyance to Auric Goldfinger, then I think this would have made it into my top three.

    Still, there is no way of lessen Goldifnger's importance for the series - more than any of the other Bond films, maybe. An absolute classic, both within the series, and the 1960's. Three(!) of my favourite Bond girls in this one, as well!
  • Posts: 173
    Goldfinger is Connery's best film, nothing should be changed.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Area 52
    Posts: 32,560
    The strings on the plane is a bit silly.

    I would add Bond s troubled mind over killing the Mexican, and Oddjob eating Goldfinger s cat. Maybe the sexual attraction between Pussy and Tilly as well. Otherwise, perfect as it is.
  • MurdockMurdock Mr. 2000
    Posts: 15,716
    Recast Tilly.
    Make the gangsters less stereotypical and dumb.
    Other than that I think it's fine.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Area 52
    Posts: 32,560
    Why did they kill off Solo instead of Jed Midnight, though?
  • Posts: 667
    I think I mentioned this in the other thread... Bond says "3 more ticks" but the countdown timer says 7 seconds left. I'd make the timer indicate 3 more seconds.

    Can't think of much else. Maybe shoot Connery on location in Miami.
  • TheWizardOfIceTheWizardOfIce 'One of the Internet's more toxic individuals'
    Posts: 9,117
    Troy wrote: »
    Gassing the Fort Knox garrison - absolutely not, they are soldiers ordered to pretend to be gassed, with a few hours notice and therefore no time to practice. Only had to fool planes flying overhead. Thought it was perfect.

    True I suppose. I'll pass the blame onto the CIA rather than Hamilton then. The way they go down wouldnt fool half a dozen gormless (albeit with pilot's licences) blonde bimbos. Oh wait...
  • Posts: 4,782
    Yes there are flaws, but I wouldn't change a damn thing. Cinema history. Class and above all others.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 28,232
    In comparison to the other Connery films-and a lot of the others too, I guess-I'd change quite a lot. In no particular order...

    *First and foremost, consistent location shooting. The only piece of the film that doesn't feel set-bound or that isn't actually just shot somewhere around Pinewood is the Switzerland sequences and some miscellaneous shots of Kentucky and Miami for establishment. It's a glaring issue that GF is the only film out of the entire 60s that is the most artificial and where the least location shooting actually happened. The Swiss section is a highlight for the gorgeous scenery that you know is actually Switzerland, then the movie speeds right through it and we spend the rest of the time in a place that is certainly not Kentucky. The entire second half misses a feeling of Americana, and it certainly doesn't help the Miami opening to have the main cast dotting from a bunch of different rear projection shots. I can understand the use of projection in action the team couldn't pull off, but in the general dialogue scenes too? Yikes.

    *Give Bond actual things to do. He shouldn't seem as lifeless or unconcerned as he feels here, with not as many hints of disgust at Goldfinger as what Sean was a master at. He's a glorified prisoner in the film and that very much restricts his impact as a character when they don't present that aspect of the script at all well. We should feel some tension and hopelessness for Bond, but instead it's easy to feel as bored by it as he looks.

    *The barn scene. Maybe a controversial choice, but the execution of this one just doesn't work for me, and comes off as very, very creepy. I think it would've been far more befitting-and more respectful-to Pussy's rather strong and independent character if Bond had a heart-to-heart with her in a dramatic verbal scene to get it through her head that Goldfinger needed to be stopped. Pussy is built up as someone immune to Bond who never buckles, so to see her turn on a dime with little motivation otherwise is strange, and it just gives the movie a "sexy" scene to get audiences enticed in their seats and not much more. Time certainly hasn't aged that particular moment of the film well.

    *Restructure the second half of the film once we get to "Kentucky." The script has far too much padding, with a series of inconsequential or tensionless things happening. We could cut out Solo's character entirely for all it really adds to anything, because just Goldfinger killing his gangsters (despite it making no sense) would transmit the same message that this guy is dangerous. The ending also leaves us hanging in the wind and wondering what is actually going on. Do Pussy's pilots know they aren't spreading death gas? Why do a lot of townspeople outside the military personnel also faint at the wheel of their cars when they wouldn't know anything about the gas plot in the first place?

    *A nitpick rather than a major fix, but go back to the drawing board for the Bond and Oddjob fight. It's got to be one of the weakest major fight sequences of early Bond, that has no tension or sense of danger to it. Bond gets thrown on the floor a bit, Oddjob smiles, then he's shocked and it's over. After the Grant fight of FRWL this one feels understandably bland and uninspired, and the very wide open set doesn't really help the team to create something to match it.


    I could probably think of more, but those are most salient to me.
  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    Posts: 2,225
    My favourite Bond film and as far as I'm concerned, perfect!

    Wouldn't change a thing!

    Look up Iconic in the dictionary and you'll probably find Goldfinger there.....!

  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Area 52
    Posts: 32,560
    I love that fight in the vault. I find it very atmospheric in a bizarre way.
  • RC7RC7
    Posts: 9,859
    I love that fight in the vault. I find it very atmospheric in a bizarre way.

    Me too.
  • mattjoesmattjoes Never go full Petachi
    Posts: 3,274
    Milovy wrote: »
    Is that Monty Norman music, or the John Barry additions to the DR. NO score? I ask because I don't think Norman was credited for anything more than the specific James Bond Theme. And likely over-credited. So to me it's a clue to how much Barry contributed in the first film. But yeah, it is garish in comparison.
    I am pretty sure the music used at the end of the boat chase (also used in Dr. No) is some stock music taken from a library. Not composed by Norman or Barry. Although... parts of it do sound a lot like the Bond theme. So I might be wrong. I don't have a source on hand at the moment for this. Does anyone know about this?

    This would be news to me. As far as I know, Monty Norman did the score for Dr. No and John Barry was brought in to punch it up through his work on the Bond theme. I always assumed that, Bond theme aside, Dr. No's music was generic and dull simply because it was by... Monty Norman.

    It does sound like stock music!
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 28,232
    I love that fight in the vault. I find it very atmospheric in a bizarre way.

    One thing the fight got right is that it doesn't layer music over it, much like in FRWL. It adds something to it that you can hear the clack of Bond and Oddjob's shoes on the floor, or the clang of the bars as Bond got thrown into them. I just disagree about the weak choreography.
  • Posts: 2,469
    The Hood's Convention is pretty terrible. Poorly written, and the acting, if anything, is even worse than the script. A complete overhaul of this sequence would be necessary.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Area 52
    Posts: 32,560
    The Hood's Convention is pretty terrible. Poorly written, and the acting, if anything, is even worse than the script. A complete overhaul of this sequence would be necessary.

    They should have just kept it as in the novel.
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