What are you reading?

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  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,687
    DarthDimi wrote:
    to tell the truth, I find it lacking the magic of The Time Machine and The War Of The Worlds, two novels for which my praise has grown beyond finite.
    Those two freakin' astound me to this day. Great reading...
  • JRRJRR
    Posts: 74
    Just thinking back on a WW2 book I have recently read by Len Deighton "Goodbye Mickey Mouse"; if you like a well researched story within this genre, you might enjoy this.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,534
    chrisisall wrote:
    DarthDimi wrote:
    to tell the truth, I find it lacking the magic of The Time Machine and The War Of The Worlds, two novels for which my praise has grown beyond finite.
    Those two freakin' astound me to this day. Great reading...

    I'm glad you approve, @chrisisall! Do you agree that none of the film adaptations ever managed to truly capture the power of the books? (And that comes from someone who really enjoys the Spielberg WOTW.)
  • Posts: 7,653
    DarthDimi wrote:
    chrisisall wrote:
    DarthDimi wrote:
    to tell the truth, I find it lacking the magic of The Time Machine and The War Of The Worlds, two novels for which my praise has grown beyond finite.
    Those two freakin' astound me to this day. Great reading...

    I'm glad you approve, @chrisisall! Do you agree that none of the film adaptations ever managed to truly capture the power of the books? (And that comes from someone who really enjoys the Spielberg WOTW.)

    the books are both excellent reading but my favorite WOTW version remains Jeff Wayne's WOTW awesome music (the worth awesome is totally warranted here!) and Richard Burtons voice as the narator is unsurpassed.
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,687
    DarthDimi wrote:
    I'm glad you approve, @chrisisall! Do you agree that none of the film adaptations ever managed to truly capture the power of the books?
    Yeah, I have to agree. There have been good films inspired by the novels... perhaps they are too simply brilliant to successfully translate to film-?
  • Lancaster007Lancaster007 Shrublands Health Clinic, England
    Posts: 1,874
    Finished A Game of Thrones (totally into it now and am watching the first two series on blu-ray - glad I came to the books first), and am reading sai King's The Wind Through The Keyhole, a Dark Tower novel. Waiting in eager anticipation for Dr Sleep.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,534
    chrisisall wrote:
    DarthDimi wrote:
    I'm glad you approve, @chrisisall! Do you agree that none of the film adaptations ever managed to truly capture the power of the books?
    Yeah, I have to agree. There have been good films inspired by the novels... perhaps they are too simply brilliant to successfully translate to film-?

    I agree! I think some novels are simply too tightly nailed to the written medium in order for them to be effectively translated on screen. Also, I believe that any hypothetical "perfect" film adaptation would fall so far out of the proper commercial canvas to where it might cost a lot yet return very little.
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,687
    DarthDimi wrote:
    I think some novels are simply too tightly nailed to the written medium in order for them to be effectively translated on screen.
    Well put.
    DarthDimi wrote:
    Also, I believe that any hypothetical "perfect" film adaptation would fall so far out of the proper commercial canvas to where it might cost a lot yet return very little.
    As big films, absolutely. As small(er) indie films I see possibilities... after I saw Moon, I realized serious that talent without the need to piss away $$$ is still out there.
  • Posts: 59
    I am now addicted to Lee Child's Jack Reacher books, aint read em all yet coz I aint paying £8 for a bl##dy book!!!, so I am haunting the charity shops for them...

    Every one I have read has been stunning
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    edited March 2013 Posts: 23,534
    chrisisall wrote:
    DarthDimi wrote:
    I think some novels are simply too tightly nailed to the written medium in order for them to be effectively translated on screen.
    Well put.
    DarthDimi wrote:
    Also, I believe that any hypothetical "perfect" film adaptation would fall so far out of the proper commercial canvas to where it might cost a lot yet return very little.
    As big films, absolutely. As small(er) indie films I see possibilities... after I saw Moon, I realized serious that talent without the need to piss away $$$ is still out there.

    Moon was absolutely fabulous and in more than one way a source of inspiration for me as a scientist and for young aspiring filmmakers, I hope, in terms of what one can achieve with a bucket of brilliant ideas and a cup of pennies. You hit the nail on the head there, @chrisisall!

  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded the Ballrooms of Mars
    edited March 2013 Posts: 12,459
    chrisM wrote:
    I am now addicted to Lee Child's Jack Reacher books, aint read em all yet coz I aint paying £8 for a bl##dy book!!!, so I am haunting the charity shops for them...

    Every one I have read has been stunning

    I've read them all and enjoyed them all. I thought Gone Tomorrow was especially well written.


  • Posts: 1,817
    Now I'm with Thinking, Fast and Slow by professor Daniel Kahneman. Interesting book about cognitive biases, including probability and statistical heuristics that usually give us false conclusions.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,534
    THE FIRST MEN IN THE MOON
    By H.G. Wells

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    Wells' fourth novel I've ever read is once again a winner. After TTM, TWOTW and TIODM (see earlier posts), I started this book with high expectancies. And I was correct in doing so, for this book may end up higher on my Wells list even than the brilliant TTM. What's even more important is that I had never watched any of the film adaptations of this book prior to reading it, so all my imaginative skills were put hard to work right away. (Side note: I am in the process of watching the 1964 film as I'm quickly typing this post. ;-)).

    TFMITM is a sheer delight for a science fiction fan like myself to read though it holds, when taken literally, absolutely no power of persuasion at this point. We simply know too much about the moon and the book's fantasies, created in 1901 - mind, are in a dire lack of prophetic powers. In other words, Wells was no Verne with this book though it would seem to me he desperately wanted to be. You see there are quite a few (deliberate?) similarities between TFMITM and Verne's Journey To The Centre Of The Earth, but I digress. Whatever ideas Wells had about the moon, and whether he believed them or not, like his notions about Mars and its alleged population in TWOTW, he's completely missed the ball. He was quite wrong about the structure of the moon, its atmospheric conditions and its ... lifeforms. I think it's becoming perfectly clear that one shouldn't read this book hoping for an amazingly accurate foretelling of our own times, at least not on the scientific elements of the story. In fact, it is mandatory for the brave reader to give the book all of its many conceits in order to enjoy it.

    But enjoy it I do. For it is not only well written - as usual in Wells' case - but excellently structured, with interesting and at times very funny character moments but also with an impressively bold subtext, bold considering the political climate Wells wrote it in. As an example, the sphere our moon travellers use as a means of transport is described almost like the Rotavirus. And indeed, while good intentions are dominant in the men's actions, they may, in the long run, introduce something of a disturbance in the quiet life of the mooneys, most notably the Selenites. For eventually, the mooneys learn about the concept of war and find it almost impossible to believe, while we tend to take it very much for granted. Other strokes of satirical genius I must deliberately omit for they may prove heavy spoilers for anyone intending to read the book.

    I like TFMITM as a SciFi adventure, a Wellsian satire and a lovely scientific daydreamer. Read it only when you're into this sort of thing but I for one love it for sure. A great book!
  • SandySandy Somewhere in Europe
    Posts: 4,012
    Finally finished A Game of Thrones, just started A Clash of Kings. I have to say that although I started slowly and hesitantly (and reading several books in between) the story finally got me. I can't wait to see what awaits me in the next volumes.
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded the Ballrooms of Mars
    Posts: 12,459
    I may give Game of Thrones a try at some point, probably summer.
    I just finished re-reading several original Sherlock Holmes stories (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle). Great fun!
  • Samuel001Samuel001 Moderator
    edited April 2013 Posts: 13,350
    Sandy wrote:
    Finally finished A Game of Thrones, just started A Clash of Kings. I have to say that although I started slowly and hesitantly (and reading several books in between) the story finally got me. I can't wait to see what awaits me in the next volumes.

    By the time the next novel comes out, you'll probably need to read all the books again, it will have been so long.

    If I ever read them, it will be when it's nearly over, so I can go straight through.
  • Posts: 12,837
    I did start reading Threat Vector but I couldn't finish it. It's so detailed it felt bloated and the typical Clancy story (so very America f**k yeah) wasn't enough to keep me entertained.

    I've got a few books I want to read now. Dr No, The Stand and Assassins Creed Forsaken.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    edited April 2013 Posts: 23,534
    THE INVISIBLE MAN
    By H.G. Wells

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    And with this here book do I conclude my five book journey through Wells' most famous SciFi classics. Right away I can say this is one hell of a wonderfully written book, as per usual, with some genuine comedy and horror at both ends of the story. For once the satirical or moralising subtext isn't as obvious as Wells often presents it. I need make effort to find some in fact. Let's just say one might read a warning in it, a warning to all scientists never to pursue let alone abuse too great a power. But the actual events following the Unseen's arrival at the Inn are much more interesting when read as just a fantastical tale.

    I must say I've had a fun time reading this book. Case in point: I never stopped reading once I had started. I finished the book in a mere few hours and was eventually surprised to find myself turning the final page. Hadn't come prepared for such a page-turning frenzy but there you are.

    I'm glad to have finally read some of Wells' greatest works and I love that fact that I end the series on a high note: The Invisible Man is another triumph. Off to reacquaint myself with the Claude Rains 1933 movie produced by Carl Laemmle Jr. now. ;-)

    For those interested in the five books I've read and posted about in the past two weeks, here's a box I can strongly recommend because it can be purchased for little money yet with all the pleasure of Wells' wonderful mind and writing skills.

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  • Posts: 194
    Just finished Shutter Island. Currently reading From Russia with Love, Othello & Richard III (for Shakespeare Class), and The Fall by Del Torro and Chuck Hogan
  • Posts: 1,817
    @DarthDimi, it sounds interesting and that box looks good. Now I want it in my book collection. I should follow your recommendation on Wells as I did with Michio Kaku.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,534
    0013 wrote:
    @DarthDimi, it sounds interesting and that box looks good. Now I want it in my book collection. I should follow your recommendation on Wells as I did with Michio Kaku.

    Nice, @0013. :-) Thanks for the compliment, good sir. ;-)

    You know, I guess at this point in time Wells isn't for everybody any more. I'm a sucker for this kind of old fashioned Sci-Fi but that's just me. So the five book box is worth a try and if you like it, hey, you might find yourself eager for more. Just take a look at the price here and you might be interested...
    http://www.bookdepository.com/Five-Great-Science-Fiction-Novels-Set-Wells/9780486439785
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 Quantum Floral Arrangements: "We Have Petals Everywhere"
    Posts: 28,694
    DarthDimi wrote:
    0013 wrote:
    @DarthDimi, it sounds interesting and that box looks good. Now I want it in my book collection. I should follow your recommendation on Wells as I did with Michio Kaku.

    Nice, @0013. :-) Thanks for the compliment, good sir. ;-)

    You know, I guess at this point in time Wells isn't for everybody any more. I'm a sucker for this kind of old fashioned Sci-Fi but that's just me. So the five book box is worth a try and if you like it, hey, you might find yourself eager for more. Just take a look at the price here and you might be interested...
    http://www.bookdepository.com/Five-Great-Science-Fiction-Novels-Set-Wells/9780486439785

    This is why I love classics. They are always the cheapest kinds of books you can get in the market, and that is quite ironic because they are the most valuable books out there for reading.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,534
    @0BradyM0Bondfanatic7

    I occasionally treat myself to a slightly more expensive hardcover version of some of the ones I really love, just to properly honour them. Let me demonstrate by saying that I own no less than four Dracula copies, each one with its very special appearance, type of paper, size, type font, ... ;-)
  • Lancaster007Lancaster007 Shrublands Health Clinic, England
    Posts: 1,874
    Powered through Scott Mariani's 6th Ben Hope novel The Lost Relic, really enjoy this author's books, fast paced action-adventure thrillers, complete page turners. Recommended.
    Now on A Clash of Kings, would like to finish this before getting around to watching Season Two on blu-ray, only four episodes in Season One to watch, so I'll have to be quick!
  • Posts: 1,817
    Now reading professor Richard Dawkins' The Greatest Show on Earth.
    I want to have more solid arguments when discussing evolution with creationists.

    100815PB-TGSOE.jpg
  • Posts: 14,816
    Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell. We often forget that he wrote something else than 1984 and Animal Farm. Orwell as a writer is a maestro.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,534
    I'm currently reading a very big book:

    H.P. Lovecraft: The Complete Fiction

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    I'd heard so much about this man and being the horror fan that I am, I guess there was absolutely no way I could miss out on the opportunity when it presented itself.

    This collection of his fiction comes true on all promised accounts. I love the material I've read so far and I have yet to dive into the Cthulhu and Necronomicon stuff. This is going to pierce right through my horror fan's heart in the best possible way.

    Lovecraft: the stuff that dreams are made of.
  • Posts: 7,653
    Just finished Doubleshot by Raymond Benson, who says NO to a 2nd hand bargain Hardcover 1st edition?- It is easily one of my least favorite continuationnovels, but I had forgotten that having read it some time ago.

    Currently reading Three wars by Maarten van Rossem in which he writes about WO1, WOII & the cold war and their conections. As always this professor in history does tell a good tale backed up by facts. I find his opinions as always refreshing.

    And for fun while travelling The sleepers of Erin by Jonathan Gash, a Lovejoy tale of murder and and antiques.
  • Posts: 1,405
    I'm currently reading ""Sherman's March"" from Burke Davis.
    Anyone interested in the American Civil War of 1861-65 should read this.
    William Tecumseh Sherman brought devastation and hopelessness to the Georgian and Carolina's people. He completely destroyed their economy, laided waste the livestock.
    Burn to the ground houses, churches, public buildings, all in the hope to bring an end to the Civil War and to make sure that the Southern States would never get the idea of making war against the North again.

    Enlightning to say the least!
  • SandySandy Somewhere in Europe
    Posts: 4,012
    Being a fan of suspense and detective stories it's amazing that I had only read one Agatha Christie book before (Murder on the Orient Express). That is about to change, however, because I just started reading The Mysterious Affair at Styles. So far so good, very enjoyable.
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