Do you want a sequel to Carte Blanche? Who would you like to write it?

edited September 2011 in Literary 007 Posts: 8,683
Just wondering do you want another modern bond thriller Deaver's world and if so who do you want as author? deaver, Child another thriller writer? maybe someone out side the spy genre Steven king perhaps lol?


Ok i said it as a joke but bond being written by Steven King i think it would be more awesome then stupid.
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Comments

  • Posts: 1,894
    Not Child - he's horrible.

    I believe the original idea behind Carte Blanche was to have a new writer for each book. Deaver has said he's open to the idea of writing a second novel if IFP ask him to, but I think the plan is to rope in as many authors as they can.

    I'll put a vote forward for Stuart MacBride. He tends to get lost in subplots and distractions and most of his characters are idiots (indeed, they've all been put together because they've embarrassed the police once too often and the police like them where they can see them), but if he can trim the fat out, he might be onto something.
  • edited September 2011 Posts: 44
    Bond walking around showing his iphone to everyone, telling people off for making rude jokes. Not smoking, drinking etc.

    GET A GRIP! X(

    Ok, I accept we can't have the original Fleming character in the films nowadays, because some idiot will start smoking if he see's Craig doing it (yet we still have the excessive drinking which seems not to be a taboo although also harmful). But can't we at least have an original story with Bond as Fleming intended? If that means it being set in the past then so be it.
  • edited September 2011 Posts: 18
    Another thriller writer would be very nice. I'd like to see Ken Follett tackle it.

    Yes, if we are given the original James Bond again but with the exception of a little less chauvinism for the sake of this PC rich world this would be entirely appreciated. I can also handle him not smoking.
  • Posts: 1,894
    David Baldacci could be an interesting choice, especially if he could recapture the feel of his earlier works, like The Winner, Total Control, Hour Game, maybe Saving Faith and quite possibly Last Man Standing. His latest run of novels have been very by-the-numbers, but the early stuff is good.

    I'd also be very interested to see Matthew Reilly have a go, but he'd have to exercise some restraint - Scarecrow was notoriously violent (and had some rather grusome parts). Like Baldacci, he had wavered; his last two entries, The Six Sacred Stones and The Five Greatest Warriors were as horrible as they were unnecessary. In fact, they were so horrible that I would normally refrain from suggesting him - but his next novel, Scarecrow and the Army of Thieves contains all the elements of his original success: tight time limits, claustrophobic locations, an impossible mission and overwhleming odds. And action: this is the man who wrote a forty-page hovercraft chase in Ice Station (well before DIE ANOTHER DAY was released) that was perfectly paced, very clear (I sometimes find action had to follow) and fresh enough that it just wasn't an overwhelming cacophony of noise; the characters always had something to do, and they never did the same thing twice. If 'the Reilly formula' could be applied to Bond, I think it would make for a very good story. Certainly something that would out-rank quite a few of the films in terms of entertainment.
  • Posts: 1,894
    I've gone off my previous suggestion of Stuart MacBride a little bit. He's a bit too quirky (while trying to catch a cannibalistic serial killer, the main characters had a very long and detailed discussion about how Muppets repreoduce), and I find he gets hung up on subplots early on (you could have cut the first hundred pages from FLESH HOUSE and BLIND EYE and the plot would have advanced by inches), but I have found another author who I think could be good for Bond - and strangely enough, he's another Scottish crime writer: Ian Rankin, of Inspector Rebus fame. I haven't actually gotten around to any of the Rebus books just yet; I'm halfway through The Complaints, the first Malcolm Fox story. It is slow at the moment, and I'm only just beginning to work out what's really going on. It's pretty straight-forward, and doesn't quite move with the pace of anything by Jeffrey Deaver, but it doesn;t really have any of Deaver's flaws, either. I think Rankin would be a good choice.
  • Posts: 7,642
    If it is a sequel to CB my pick would be Deaver himself.
  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe Still waiting for the Jena Malone Batwoman movie that's never going to be made.Moderator
    Posts: 11,951
    I've gone off my previous suggestion of Stuart MacBride a little bit. He's a bit too quirky (while trying to catch a cannibalistic serial killer, the main characters had a very long and detailed discussion about how Muppets repreoduce), and I find he gets hung up on subplots early on (you could have cut the first hundred pages from FLESH HOUSE and BLIND EYE and the plot would have advanced by inches), but I have found another author who I think could be good for Bond - and strangely enough, he's another Scottish crime writer: Ian Rankin, of Inspector Rebus fame. I haven't actually gotten around to any of the Rebus books just yet; I'm halfway through The Complaints, the first Malcolm Fox story. It is slow at the moment, and I'm only just beginning to work out what's really going on. It's pretty straight-forward, and doesn't quite move with the pace of anything by Jeffrey Deaver, but it doesn;t really have any of Deaver's flaws, either. I think Rankin would be a good choice.
    And if I got my wish of Ken Stott as M in the films, that would make a neat bit of Bond/Rebus trivia.
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded Riding a white swan to Matera
    edited October 2011 Posts: 12,175
    how did I just double post by accident??
  • Posts: 1,894
    And if I got my wish of Ken Stott as M in the films, that would make a neat bit of Bond/Rebus trivia.
    Actually, I'm changing my mind about Rankin, too. I liked The Complints to start with, but I had a lot of difficulty following it by the end because it was unclear how the two separate plots were related to one another. I started on The Hanging Garden just to be sure, and I'm finding it slow and I have no motivation to return to ti.
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded Riding a white swan to Matera
    Posts: 12,175
    Do try Resurrection Men, my fav Rebus! It is truly good.
  • Agent007391Agent007391 Up, Up, Down, Down, Left, Right, Left, Right, B, A, Start
    Posts: 7,833
    I think Grant Blackwood's a pretty good writer, he just needs to use spell-check more often.
  • Posts: 136
    I would love for Deaver to return but I also like the idea of having a fresh author for each book. I enjoy reading Tom Cain, his Sam Carver character is fun. Stephen King would be an interesting choice. Writing outside of his comfort zone could produce some interesting results. In a similar vein Jonathan Maberry is another author I enjoy. His Joe Ledger books are horror/action but, as with King, writing something different may bring out a fresh spin on Bond.
  • Posts: 7,642
    What I want for the next novel is an author that like Kingsly Amis tries to write about the literary creation of Ian Fleming. And NOT about the "movie"character of 007.
  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe Still waiting for the Jena Malone Batwoman movie that's never going to be made.Moderator
    edited October 2011 Posts: 11,951
    And if I got my wish of Ken Stott as M in the films, that would make a neat bit of Bond/Rebus trivia.
    Actually, I'm changing my mind about Rankin, too. I liked The Complints to start with, but I had a lot of difficulty following it by the end because it was unclear how the two separate plots were related to one another. I started on The Hanging Garden just to be sure, and I'm finding it slow and I have no motivation to return to ti.
    I've not actually read any of the books, i've only seen the tv series (both). Though I do have a copy of each: Knots And Crosses, Tooth And Nail and Black And Blue, but as I said, I never got around to reading them.

  • HASEROTHASEROT has returned like the tedious inevitability of an unloved season---
    Posts: 4,399
    What I want for the next novel is an author that like Kingsly Amis tries to write about the literary creation of Ian Fleming. And NOT about the "movie"character of 007.
    We already got that, with "Devil My Care"... and the result was "so so"...

    in my opinion, what is the point of trying to copy Fleming? - it's hard enough to write a Bond book without being compared against the master, but to blatantly copy his style... thats like someone wearing Michael Jordan's jersey and saying "i'm going to go and play just like him, but for this new generation." ..... with all respect, Fleming is dead - let his style be his... if we are bringing in another writer to write the books, let them do their own thing...

    I think Deaver is crafting something wonderful with CB (i say that because i have yet to finish it - i'm halfway through).. so I would naturally love to have him return to write another outing.. he sets the mood perfectly, knows how to write tension and suspense.. so i would welcome him back with open arms, should the publishers request it.

  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 28,231
    What I want for the next novel is an author that like Kingsly Amis tries to write about the literary creation of Ian Fleming. And NOT about the "movie"character of 007.
    We already got that, with "Devil My Care"... and the result was "so so"...

    in my opinion, what is the point of trying to copy Fleming? - it's hard enough to write a Bond book without being compared against the master, but to blatantly copy his style... thats like someone wearing Michael Jordan's jersey and saying "i'm going to go and play just like him, but for this new generation." ..... with all respect, Fleming is dead - let his style be his... if we are bringing in another writer to write the books, let them do their own thing...

    I think Deaver is crafting something wonderful with CB (i say that because i have yet to finish it - i'm halfway through).. so I would naturally love to have him return to write another outing.. he sets the mood perfectly, knows how to write tension and suspense.. so i would welcome him back with open arms, should the publishers request it.

    Well, DMC was released on Fleming's 100th so It had to be written in his stead I'd say, but nonetheless you make good points.
  • HASEROTHASEROT has returned like the tedious inevitability of an unloved season---
    Posts: 4,399
    What I want for the next novel is an author that like Kingsly Amis tries to write about the literary creation of Ian Fleming. And NOT about the "movie"character of 007.
    We already got that, with "Devil My Care"... and the result was "so so"...

    in my opinion, what is the point of trying to copy Fleming? - it's hard enough to write a Bond book without being compared against the master, but to blatantly copy his style... thats like someone wearing Michael Jordan's jersey and saying "i'm going to go and play just like him, but for this new generation." ..... with all respect, Fleming is dead - let his style be his... if we are bringing in another writer to write the books, let them do their own thing...

    I think Deaver is crafting something wonderful with CB (i say that because i have yet to finish it - i'm halfway through).. so I would naturally love to have him return to write another outing.. he sets the mood perfectly, knows how to write tension and suspense.. so i would welcome him back with open arms, should the publishers request it.

    Well, DMC was released on Fleming's 100th so It had to be written in his stead I'd say, but nonetheless you make good points.
    I understand... but you make it sound like they were like "Sorry 'bout that chap Fleming not being able to make it 'round to his 100th birthday, what a bother.. Sebastian, can you write this instead and just pretend to be him?" lmao..

    being an artist - I am all for someone maintaining their individuality as an artist.. if it turns out that they hire a writer, who was influenced greatly by Fleming, and borrows cues from him, then so be it.. but to blatantly rip off a style, regardless of what for i believe is soul-less - like the Gus Van Sant shot for shot remake of Psycho in 1998... we know it's not being written by Fleming, so why to pretend as such... I've got the Fleming Bond novels, I want to read something new and contemporary, and exciting - not something new, that is trying to be old.... if that makes sense..
  • Posts: 7,642
    I do not write as a copy of Fleming, but write a decent thriller without all the gadgets and so. (something that all the moviefan always complain about) There were very few in the Fleming novels. Mostly it was about the man, the policeman, that got in and out of situations due to his great survival instincts. And most of Flemings books were not about world domination.
  • SAMSAM
    Posts: 107
    I have recently finished the Carte Blanche Novel. Though the novel was well written by Deaver, I believe the storyline was a little lightweight; hence I don't believe a sequel should be done.

    Having said that, I welcome the premise of bringing Bond into the modern day.
    A Bond who is completely ruthless, cunning, sinister and so forth.

    The next Bond novel should be a completely new adventure and I believe an author who would be ideal is Nelson Demille.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 It was this or the priesthood.
    Posts: 28,231
    What I want for the next novel is an author that like Kingsly Amis tries to write about the literary creation of Ian Fleming. And NOT about the "movie"character of 007.
    We already got that, with "Devil My Care"... and the result was "so so"...

    in my opinion, what is the point of trying to copy Fleming? - it's hard enough to write a Bond book without being compared against the master, but to blatantly copy his style... thats like someone wearing Michael Jordan's jersey and saying "i'm going to go and play just like him, but for this new generation." ..... with all respect, Fleming is dead - let his style be his... if we are bringing in another writer to write the books, let them do their own thing...

    I think Deaver is crafting something wonderful with CB (i say that because i have yet to finish it - i'm halfway through).. so I would naturally love to have him return to write another outing.. he sets the mood perfectly, knows how to write tension and suspense.. so i would welcome him back with open arms, should the publishers request it.

    Well, DMC was released on Fleming's 100th so It had to be written in his stead I'd say, but nonetheless you make good points.
    I understand... but you make it sound like they were like "Sorry 'bout that chap Fleming not being able to make it 'round to his 100th birthday, what a bother.. Sebastian, can you write this instead and just pretend to be him?" lmao..

    being an artist - I am all for someone maintaining their individuality as an artist.. if it turns out that they hire a writer, who was influenced greatly by Fleming, and borrows cues from him, then so be it.. but to blatantly rip off a style, regardless of what for i believe is soul-less - like the Gus Van Sant shot for shot remake of Psycho in 1998... we know it's not being written by Fleming, so why to pretend as such... I've got the Fleming Bond novels, I want to read something new and contemporary, and exciting - not something new, that is trying to be old.... if that makes sense..
    I don't like the idea either. Fleming is Fleming and no one will ever beat him out. I like Bond writers taking their own style to it. What I was saying was Faulks wrote in the stead of Fleming for his 100th to honor him. Not the best way really. Just acknowledge him in the front pages of the book or do a thoughtful introduction, but oh well. We got what we got.
  • Posts: 2,531
    Sequel? As in a direct continuation/part 2 to Carte Blanche or just a second, separate Bond book like in the other Bond book series?

    I'd like Allan Folsom to write a second separate Book and give us a true portrayal of the REAL James Bond (I don't mind there being an absence of racism and smoking ) unlike what Deaver gave us - some spy who ownly shared the same name and alcohol intake as the original Bond. I did like Deaver's story though. :)


    Folsom's The Day After Tomorrow is a splendid novel where the ending is very reminiscent of a Fleming book. A well written, exciting yarn.


  • Posts: 612
    I enjoyed DMC, certainly more than Carte Blanche. DMC was definitely sporting the 'Bond' feel - and that's what I thought was lacking in CB.
  • Posts: 2,531
    I thought DMC was enjoyable to an extent. I certainly thought it was on the bland side, lacking punch, however atleast it felt to me like I was reading about the real James Bond and not about some stranger like the protagonist spy in Carte Blanche.
  • Posts: 1,894
    QR Markham!










    Just kidding. He's already written a Bond novel and passed it off as his own work.
  • Posts: 297
    If it could be from somebody not in the thriller genre per se I'd have Iain Banks or Bernard Cornwell. If it's got to be a thriller writer Rakin would still be amongst my favourites. If it has to be an American for reasons of market recognition Michael Connelly or Elmore Leonard would be my choices.
  • It would be nice, yes, if they had an author, (Deaver, preferably) continue on with the Carte Blanche timeline. They rebooted Bond with Devil May Care, and then again with Deaver's Bond. Are we ever going to have continuity again with Bond novels? The last time we had continuity was with Benson (1997-2002.)
  • edited December 2011 Posts: 1,894
    Daniel Silva, who is probably best known for the Gabriel Allon series. I'm a few chapters into A Death In Vienna, and I really like his style. It's very clear, and easy reading. I do have some concerns though, mostly because of his attitude towards certain elements of his stories. Allon is an Israeli spy and assassin, and a lot of characters come across as blaze. It's like they're saying "we're Israeli, so whatever we do is acceptable", even when they're using the same tactics against their enemies as their enemies used against them first. But I don't think it would be an issue, since Bond is British.

    Grant Blackwood. I broke character and borrowed an anthology of short stories from the library, and one of the strongest that I've ready so far was by Blackwood. I've found a lot of the stories are a little too ambitiuous for their word-count, but Blackwood had a neat little spy thriller set in the 1950s called Sacrificial Lion where an American spy tricked the Soviets into assassinating their own key strategists. I was a little surprised to find that he co-authored a few books with Clive Cussler; I found a lot of Cussler's later books to be very weak, and I thought little of his co-written works.

    David Morrell, who I also found through the thriller anthology. I know he wrote First Blood, but the thing I found most interesting wa the way his short story, The Abelard Sanction, was the resolution of a cliffhanger in a series that he stopped writing over a decade ago following the death of his son. Despite the fact that I have never read any of his books before, I really liked the short story; it was clear and concise, and like Blackwood, he wasn't too ambitious for the word count.

    Chris Mooney. Another one taken from the thriller compendium, and another continuation of a novel. Apparently he never intended to revisit one of his characters, but a lot of his fans wanted to know what happened next, and he wrote his entry to see if he could keep writing the character. It wasn't as well-paced as the stories by Morrell or Blackwood, but it was enough to pique my interest and to try and find the original story.
  • 4EverBonded4EverBonded Riding a white swan to Matera
    Posts: 12,175
    Andrew Vachss anyone? I am rather half joking here ... or Nelson DeMille ...

    I really do not like Deaver's writing.

    Kennon: yes, Bernard Cornwell could be good, think.
  • Posts: 1,894
    I'm liking the idea of Daniel Silva more and more. I'm halfway through THE CONFESSOR, and I'm deeply impressed by it: it's about a conspiracy and a cover-up that goes to the highest levels of the Vatican, but it has none of the Dan Brown rubbish about Jesus' descendants and sun-worshipping sects. It's actually a lot like Tom Clancy's RED RABBIT, but easier to read because Silva doesn't get hung up on the finer technical points of military operations.
  • Eric Van Lustbader would be my choice, great author
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