Where does Bond go after Craig?

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  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    Posts: 14,917
    peter wrote: »
    Getting back to the original point to this conversation: where does Bond go after Craig?

    The Amazon deal has gone through.

    Barbara Broccoli and MGW have stated they’re not interested in a Bond streaming series nor streaming their films without first showcasing the films in the cinemas worldwide.

    Next up I think we can anticipate hearing about the writers being hired and working on the script…

    Once a script is in good shape, they will go after…. Denis Villeneuve as director… he will then direct the finalists in scenes from the new script. From here-

    The new James Bond will be announced to the world, with a release date attached….

    I certainly agree that we’re more likely to hear about a director and script before we have a new Bond.
  • Posts: 12,837
    peter wrote: »
    Getting back to the original point to this conversation: where does Bond go after Craig?

    The Amazon deal has gone through.

    Barbara Broccoli and MGW have stated they’re not interested in a Bond streaming series nor streaming their films without first showcasing the films in the cinemas worldwide.

    Next up I think we can anticipate hearing about the writers being hired and working on the script…

    Once a script is in good shape, they will go after…. Denis Villeneuve as director… he will then direct the finalists in scenes from the new script. From here-

    The new James Bond will be announced to the world, with a release date attached….

    Villeneuve does seem like a good prediction, he’s just found great success doing a blockbuster and he’s exactly the sort of name they’ve gone for lately. My only worry is, would his style be a bit too Craig era for the reboot? I can’t picture him giving us anything lighter in tone for example, and I’m sure a Bond film from him would be as long as the last few. He’s great, but I don’t know if he’d be my personal choice for the next one.

    I really have no idea where they’ll go next myself, and I’m trying not to set myself up with any expectations, but I do like the idea of a Bond in his late 20s/early 30s doing a Royal Marines/SBS origin story. I’ve always been resistant to the idea of someone so young doing it, but I like the idea of exploring his military service, and someone so young would immediately be able to set himself apart from Craig.
  • CharmianBondCharmianBond Pett Bottom, Kent
    Posts: 534
    I'm glad they're still resistant to doing spin-off series, there isn't anything I would want put on screen that couldn't be done through other extended media, especially if it's going to be under Amazon's purview and I feel like it would detract from the film series rather than adding to it.

    But if they did for some reason want to do a flashback or even god forbid a Young Bond series with Auntie C, Vickie McClure with her s6 LoD haircut looks almost the spitting image of Kev Walker's artwork, which is somewhat ironic that she plays Mrs Jones in Amazon's Alex Rider adaptation.
  • ImpertinentGoonImpertinentGoon Everybody needs a hobby.
    Posts: 1,351
    I do think they will try to make more of a splash with the director announcement and then have a comparatively unknown actor for the lead role announced a bit later. Villeneuve probably is too obvious, as would be Nolan, but I think those are the waters they are fishing in.
    I'm glad they're still resistant to doing spin-off series, there isn't anything I would want put on screen that couldn't be done through other extended media, especially if it's going to be under Amazon's purview and I feel like it would detract from the film series rather than adding to it.

    But if they did for some reason want to do a flashback or even god forbid a Young Bond series with Auntie C, Vickie McClure with her s6 LoD haircut looks almost the spitting image of Kev Walker's artwork, which is somewhat ironic that she plays Mrs Jones in Amazon's Alex Rider adaptation.

    I've said it before, but I would greatly enjoy a kind of Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead for the Bond universe. Two guys in Q's IT department during Skyfall or even henchmen in the crater base in YOLT or something like that. However, that's probably too meta and too fan-fictiony to actually work.

    I also always liked @mtm's idea of a show about Francisco Scaramanga, but I think the problem there is that there would always be speculation and confusion about whether that will culminate in the film TMWTGG or the book or in a completely different way. The typical prequel dilemma.
  • VenutiusVenutius Yorkshire
    Posts: 2,914
    Yeah, I'm fine with Fukunaga not coming back, too. Give someone else a go. Look what happened when Mendes had another shot...
  • GadgetManGadgetMan Lagos, Nigeria
    Posts: 4,247
    Venutius wrote: »
    Yeah, I'm fine with Fukunaga not coming back, too. Give someone else a go. Look what happened when Mendes had another shot...

    I agree. Another director should do it. Fukunaga might end up repeating himself...maybe he might include a child/children again, like he loves doing in some of his films. I'm also not a fan of the inconsistent tone in NTTD. Sam Mendes balanced the tone of his two Bond films better.
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    Posts: 14,917
    GadgetMan wrote: »
    Venutius wrote: »
    Yeah, I'm fine with Fukunaga not coming back, too. Give someone else a go. Look what happened when Mendes had another shot...

    I agree. Another director should do it. Fukunaga might end up repeating himself...maybe he might include a child/children again, like he loves doing in some of his films. I'm also not a fan of the inconsistent tone in NTTD. Sam Mendes balanced the tone of his two Bond films better.

    Yes I agree. Fukunaga got the dramatic very well, but he didn't make it feel like a Bond film for my money. Mendes never lost sight of that.
  • GadgetManGadgetMan Lagos, Nigeria
    Posts: 4,247
    mtm wrote: »
    GadgetMan wrote: »
    Venutius wrote: »
    Yeah, I'm fine with Fukunaga not coming back, too. Give someone else a go. Look what happened when Mendes had another shot...

    I agree. Another director should do it. Fukunaga might end up repeating himself...maybe he might include a child/children again, like he loves doing in some of his films. I'm also not a fan of the inconsistent tone in NTTD. Sam Mendes balanced the tone of his two Bond films better.

    Yes I agree. Fukunaga got the dramatic very well, but he didn't make it feel like a Bond film for my money. Mendes never lost sight of that.

    Yeah, he never. Mendes understood the Bondian way better.
  • talos7talos7 New Orleans
    Posts: 7,942
    I would love to see Fukunaga return; while I liked, but didn’t love NTTD, I think he did a great job. I d believe he was boxed, and in some ways weighed down by what EON was trying to do in continuing the threads started in SPECTRE. I would love to see what he would do with a blank canvas.
  • VenutiusVenutius Yorkshire
    edited March 2022 Posts: 2,914
    Tbh, yes, the more that time's gone on, the more that the tonal shifts in NTTD have started to jar. Matera and the title song followed immediately by Borat is too big a shift from the mood that's been set - the last few times I've watched it, I've actually skipped the whole Obruchev kidnapping sequence. Last time, I even found myself zoning out once the firefight started in Cuba too. Luckily, Ana de Armas kept regaining my attention, but it's getting worrying, man!
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    edited March 2022 Posts: 14,917
    I've never enjoyed the Cuba bit as much as others seem to. It is a brief bit of nearly fun, but there's nothing really especially Bondy in there- it's just shooting and fighting. Something like Skyfall just tickles my Bond glands more: the whole casino sequence, bike chase, dangling off skyscrapers, Tube chase etc. - he does cool things.

    I've only watched NTTD twice. It's a decent film, but it just doesn't feel like a Bond film to me- I don't want to watch it. Not because of the child or his death or anything in the actual narrative in fact; it just doesn't have the texture of a Bond film. And I guess I'd have to put that at the director's feet.
    And to be honest, it doesn't have the thrills or fun or tension of something like MI Fallout.
  • Posts: 1,703
    I'd rather see Campbell take the reins again than any of the other directors mention here. I think he could make a film as different as Casino Royale was to Goldeneye. He get's Bond.
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    Posts: 14,917
    Yep, Campbell, as with Mendes, can do 'Bond', whereas I feel like Forster and Fukunaga don't quite get it.
  • GadgetManGadgetMan Lagos, Nigeria
    edited March 2022 Posts: 4,247
    mtm wrote: »
    I've never enjoyed the Cuba bit as much as others seem to. It is a brief bit of nearly fun, but there's nothing really especially Bondy in there- it's just shooting and fighting. Something like Skyfall just tickles my Bond glands more: the whole casino sequence, bike chase, dangling off skyscrapers, Tube chase etc. - he does cool things.

    I've only watched NTTD twice. It's a decent film, but it just doesn't feel like a Bond film to me- I don't want to watch it. Not because of the child or his death or anything in the actual narrative in fact; it just doesn't have the texture of a Bond film. And I guess I'd have to put that at the director's feet.
    And to be honest, it doesn't have the thrills or fun or tension of something like MI Fallout.

    Honestly, from the trailers I expected something truly Bondian to happen in Cuba. A great deal of the Cuba sequence feels like a generic Netflix spy film. The only time it begins to get a bit interesting, is when Bond takes his drink and slides over the bar, wields his gun stylishly out of the bar's entrance and starts shooting, with Paloma crashing the car and it was in that moment that Zimmer also thought it appropriate to bring back his version of the Bond theme that can be heard in Square Escape and Opening The Doors.
  • Posts: 12,248
    I’d definitely like to see either Campbell one last time or a small-name, workmanlike director have the next crack at it. In a way I feel like the high art level Bond has reached lately has hurt it in a way.
  • slide_99slide_99 USA
    edited March 2022 Posts: 650
    Villenueve will make a pretty but hollow 3-hour endurance contest that gets a bunch of awards and 95% fresh on Rotten Tomatoes that ultimately feels like a soulless exercise, which unfortunately probably means that he's at the top of EON's list at the moment.

    The Bond series needs directors who understand that these are action movies, not prestige movies, and films them accordingly. More importantly these movies need directors who understand the Bond character, unlike these scarf-wearing types who are more concerned with subverting Bond than respecting him.
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    Posts: 14,917
    GadgetMan wrote: »
    mtm wrote: »
    I've never enjoyed the Cuba bit as much as others seem to. It is a brief bit of nearly fun, but there's nothing really especially Bondy in there- it's just shooting and fighting. Something like Skyfall just tickles my Bond glands more: the whole casino sequence, bike chase, dangling off skyscrapers, Tube chase etc. - he does cool things.

    I've only watched NTTD twice. It's a decent film, but it just doesn't feel like a Bond film to me- I don't want to watch it. Not because of the child or his death or anything in the actual narrative in fact; it just doesn't have the texture of a Bond film. And I guess I'd have to put that at the director's feet.
    And to be honest, it doesn't have the thrills or fun or tension of something like MI Fallout.

    Honestly, from the trailers I expected something truly Bondian to happen in Cuba. A great deal of the Cuba sequence feels like a generic Netflix spy film. The only time it begins to get a bit interesting, is when Bond takes his drink and slides over the bar, wields his gun stylishly out of the bar's entrance and starts shooting, with Paloma crashing the car and it was in that moment that Zimmer also thought it appropriate to bring back his version of the Bond theme that can be heard in Square Escape and Opening The Doors.

    It's just a shame that Bond ends up just shooting a gun rather than doing anything cool (I liked the bit where he threw the tray, but that's not exactly a hearty meal for a Bond fan).

    The only person who does anything Bondish is Paloma with that car thing: that's his usual style of getting things done i.e. coming up with an inventive and even amusing use of what's around him to get what he wants, no matter how destructive it is.

    As you mention, Zimmer doesn't really play the Bond theme in the film because there's no place to play it: Bond doesn't do anything Bondish after the bike jump. We get that rendition when he returns to London, but that feels kind of half-hearted more than anything, and is a pale imitation of the exact same sequence from Skyfall.
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 4,095
    FoxRox wrote: »
    I’d definitely like to see either Campbell one last time or a small-name, workmanlike director have the next crack at it. In a way I feel like the high art level Bond has reached lately has hurt it in a way.
    slide_99 wrote: »
    Villenueve will make a pretty but hollow 3-hour endurance contest that gets a bunch of awards and 95% fresh on Rotten Tomatoes that ultimately feels like a soulless exercise, which unfortunately probably means that he's at the top of EON's list at the moment.

    The Bond series needs directors who understand that these are action movies, not prestige movies, and films them accordingly. More importantly these movies need directors who understand the Bond character, and these scarf-wearing types who are more concerned with subverting Bond than respecting him.

    I agree about a workmanship director. It’s time for the artsy directors to a break. That’s why Martin Campbell is so well regarded. He also had the balls to tell Purvis and Wade: your work sucks.
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    Posts: 14,917
    I'm not sure Mr Campbell would take it as a complement to be called 'workmanlike'! :)
  • Posts: 1,550
    Martin Campbell would not be the first or only director - or writer, or producer, or actor, or photographer, etc. - who worked on stinkers as well as great films. It does not mean he no longer is capable of greatness. Besides - his wheelhouse is First Film with a New Bond Actor. Second film ? Nope. Third film ? Oh, no. First Films only, if you please.
  • GadgetManGadgetMan Lagos, Nigeria
    edited March 2022 Posts: 4,247
    mtm wrote: »
    GadgetMan wrote: »
    mtm wrote: »
    I've never enjoyed the Cuba bit as much as others seem to. It is a brief bit of nearly fun, but there's nothing really especially Bondy in there- it's just shooting and fighting. Something like Skyfall just tickles my Bond glands more: the whole casino sequence, bike chase, dangling off skyscrapers, Tube chase etc. - he does cool things.

    I've only watched NTTD twice. It's a decent film, but it just doesn't feel like a Bond film to me- I don't want to watch it. Not because of the child or his death or anything in the actual narrative in fact; it just doesn't have the texture of a Bond film. And I guess I'd have to put that at the director's feet.
    And to be honest, it doesn't have the thrills or fun or tension of something like MI Fallout.

    Honestly, from the trailers I expected something truly Bondian to happen in Cuba. A great deal of the Cuba sequence feels like a generic Netflix spy film. The only time it begins to get a bit interesting, is when Bond takes his drink and slides over the bar, wields his gun stylishly out of the bar's entrance and starts shooting, with Paloma crashing the car and it was in that moment that Zimmer also thought it appropriate to bring back his version of the Bond theme that can be heard in Square Escape and Opening The Doors.

    It's just a shame that Bond ends up just shooting a gun rather than doing anything cool (I liked the bit where he threw the tray, but that's not exactly a hearty meal for a Bond fan).

    The only person who does anything Bondish is Paloma with that car thing: that's his usual style of getting things done i.e. coming up with an inventive and even amusing use of what's around him to get what he wants, no matter how destructive it is.

    As you mention, Zimmer doesn't really play the Bond theme in the film because there's no place to play it: Bond doesn't do anything Bondish after the bike jump. We get that rendition when he returns to London, but that feels kind of half-hearted more than anything, and is a pale imitation of the exact same sequence from Skyfall.

    Correct! Previous Bond directors also understood that inventiveness makes Bond standout....that's why Martin Campbell also knew that the statue staying on top the tanker as Bond drives it in GE, and then putting the statue between the two cars was what would make it standout, not necessarily smashing things on the road. A James Bond film director has to be inventive....mostly in the action scenes, or else the films become like any other action film. Also, forster in the scaffold sequence in QoS, makes sure a rope holds Bond upside so he can reach his gun then turn and shoot Mitchell....so Bond doesn't just shoot Mitchell, as if it's a Steven Seagal film.
  • DenbighDenbigh UK
    Posts: 5,869
    I personally thought Fukunaga nailed the Bondian aesthetic and tone. The entire Cuba sequence was one of the most Bondian sequences in the whole of Craig’s era.
  • VenutiusVenutius Yorkshire
    Posts: 2,914
    mtm wrote: »
    The only person who does anything Bondish is Paloma with that car thing: that's his usual style of getting things done i.e. coming up with an inventive and even amusing use of what's around him to get what he wants, no matter how destructive it is.
    Yeah, true, but it was worth having Paloma do it just for that squeal, right? ;)
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    edited March 2022 Posts: 14,917
    Venutius wrote: »
    mtm wrote: »
    The only person who does anything Bondish is Paloma with that car thing: that's his usual style of getting things done i.e. coming up with an inventive and even amusing use of what's around him to get what he wants, no matter how destructive it is.
    Yeah, true, but it was worth having Paloma do it just for that squeal, right? ;)

    Oh I have nothing against Paloma, and she was as much fun there as she was in the rest of it; I just wish Bond had had something cool to do too. He just fired guns and punched people, it's boring.
  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe "I tolerate this century, but I don't enjoy it."Moderator
    Posts: 13,894
    I don't like using the term 'workmanlike' myself, but I agree with the sentiment behind it, in regards type of director. I would rather no frills/company men type director, whether they cast in-house or not.
  • This might sound a bit out there, but I think Paul King (Paddington) would make a fantastic director. He understands plot very well, uses action within the context of story extremely well too, is very inventive and drips with Britishness. We could use some levity too.
  • Posts: 1,550
    There's some precedent, in a sideways kinda sorta way, for getting the Paddington director on a Bond, after all. What ? Doesn't everyone recall Sean Connery after he was Bond, in The Avengers with Ralph Fiennes before he was M, in which Connery wore a full-size, head to toe Stuffed Bear outfit ?
  • BirdlesonBirdleson Moderator
    Posts: 2,161
    I don't like using the term 'workmanlike' myself, but I agree with the sentiment behind it, in regards type of director. I would rather no frills/company men type director, whether they cast in-house or not.

    I always considered the term as “workman” as a positive in regards to Bond films. It was a family system that promoted from within. You wanted a dependable grounded director that understood the legacy and the system. Once they went for the big or the hottest name the results were dramatically mixed, which is to be expected, but something has been missing as well. The “house” look, or feel. I miss it.
  • George_KaplanGeorge_Kaplan Not a red herring
    Posts: 559
    Journeyman is probably a better term than workmanlike.
  • talos7talos7 New Orleans
    Posts: 7,942
    Semantics…
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