Licence to Kill Screening with John Glen

2

Comments

  • edited August 2016 Posts: 11,189
    tanaka123 wrote: »
    BAIN123 wrote: »
    i can't quite put my finger on it but i do think that sometimes Dalton almost pushed his performances a bit too much to the point where it came off as a little fake.

    He had some really good scenes, but there were others that just felt like he was using all his acting chops as opposed to being genuine (the scene with Lupe in the casino, finding Della and even the scene with M where Brown easily gives the better performance).

    He was acting tough rather than actually being tough - especially in LTK.

    A good example is the beginning of this scene. Notice his dramatic stares, the double take when the waitress comes and the way he stares at Pam waiting for her to deliver her line.


    It's ultimately all opinion though,

    To be honest I've always thought that scene was meant to be humourous.

    Maybe it was. The fight itself was definitely meant to be comical.
  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe "I tolerate this century, but I don't enjoy it."Moderator
    Posts: 13,970
    I don't think that I have ever found that scene to be humourous.
  • Posts: 11,189
    I don't think that I have ever found that scene to be humourous.

    The fight scene is obviously humorous but I think the meeting and Dario was meant to be played straight.

    I know this is nit-picking but I've also noticed how Dalts changed his pronunciation of "fast" from the previous film ("we're losing fuel, farst")
  • Posts: 4,325
    Yes, I meant the fight scene is comical. It's one of the things that's quite jarring with LTK in my opinion. It certainly is brutal and harder-edged but each time I rewatch it I'm surprised by how much humour is in it - and it is a cheesy kind of humour - more so than in The Living Daylights.
  • suavejmfsuavejmf Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England
    Posts: 5,131
    BAIN123 wrote: »
    I don't think that I have ever found that scene to be humourous.

    The fight scene is obviously humorous but I think the meeting and Dario was meant to be played straight.

    I know this is nit-picking but I've also noticed how Dalts changed his pronunciation of "fast" from the previous film ("we're losing fuel, farst")

    Farst us the correct pronunciation and the queens English.....just how Bond should say it.
  • Posts: 11,189
    suavejmf wrote: »
    BAIN123 wrote: »
    I don't think that I have ever found that scene to be humourous.

    The fight scene is obviously humorous but I think the meeting and Dario was meant to be played straight.

    I know this is nit-picking but I've also noticed how Dalts changed his pronunciation of "fast" from the previous film ("we're losing fuel, farst")

    Farst us the correct pronunciation and the queens English.....just how Bond should say it.

    ...but in LTK he says "faast".
  • suavejmfsuavejmf Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England
    Posts: 5,131
    Ah right...hadn't noticed. Your right then that's not how Bond should say it! He's not from Leeds! ;)
  • edited August 2016 Posts: 11,189
    It's just nit picking on my part.
  • Posts: 4,030
    BAIN123 wrote: »
    It's just nit picking on my part.

    I think you mean nitpicking on your paaart.
  • Posts: 5,767
    BAIN123 wrote: »
    I don't think that I have ever found that scene to be humourous.

    The fight scene is obviously humorous but I think the meeting and Dario was meant to be played straight.
    Straight but kinda cheesy.

  • TheWizardOfIceTheWizardOfIce 'One of the Internet's more toxic individuals'
    Posts: 9,117
    BAIN123 wrote: »
    i can't quite put my finger on it but i do think that sometimes Dalton almost pushed his performances a bit too much to the point where it came off as a little fake.

    He had some really good scenes, but there were others that just felt like he was using all his acting chops as opposed to being genuine (the scene with Lupe in the casino, finding Della and even the scene with M where Brown easily gives the better performance).

    He was acting tough rather than actually being tough - especially in LTK.

    A good example is the beginning of this scene. Notice his dramatic stares, the double take when the waitress comes and the way he stares at Pam waiting for her to deliver her line.


    It's ultimately all opinion though,

    Indeed. Thoughout the bar scene (pre the fight) he has this maniacal glare on his face the whole time.

    Bond is supposed to look tough yes, but not psychotic.

    I have to say I find Dalton's performance in TLD infinitely superior to LTK where he comes across as too theatrical most of the time and downright hammy on occasion. His overacting in the scene where he finds Felix and Della bears no comparison to the similar but sublime scene in TLD where he finds Saunders.
  • Posts: 11,189
    boldfinger wrote: »
    BAIN123 wrote: »
    I don't think that I have ever found that scene to be humourous.

    The fight scene is obviously humorous but I think the meeting and Dario was meant to be played straight.
    Straight but kinda cheesy.

    "He's had enough...run the tab"

    Yeah I get what you mean.
  • Posts: 7,006
    I remember a review of LTK (a positive one!) and the reviewer used the term "almost psychotic" to describe Daltons performance (the maniacal laugh when first meeting Sanchez etc). Have to say I love that. Dalton was more natural in TLD, but i equally love LTK. It makes sense that Bond went over the edge. The film makes out that Bonds motivation was Leiters maiming! But i like to think it was Dellas death. That it brought back memories of Tracys killing, his single minded mission to kill Sanchez, intefered with the Narcotics squad and Pams plans! When it all gets messed up Bond has to use his wits to put things right! I think LTKs story is well told, and Daltons performance is compelling. I prefer this darker portrayal than a Bond tossing out inane one-liners amid padded out action scenes!
  • Posts: 11,189
    I like the idea of Bond being emotionally effected by a close friend being injured, but I have to admit that I find the set-up in LTK somewhat generic.

    Also, I don't particularly like Della anymore. I find her character bland and slightly annoying ("end up going fishing on my honeymoon") and her relationship with Bond not all that convincing.

    That said I LOVE Dalton's response when she talks about marriage outside the house. Actually, one of my favourite moments of his.
  • Posts: 4,325
    BAIN123 wrote: »
    I like the idea of Bond being emotionally effected by a close friend being injured, but I have to admit that I find the set-up in LTK somewhat generic.

    Also, I don't particularly like Della anymore. I find her character bland and slightly annoying ("end up going fishing on my honeymoon") and her relationship with Bond not all that convincing.

    That said I LOVE Dalton's response when she talks about marriage outside the house. Actually, one of my favourite moments of his.

    She was in an episode of Starsky and Hutch though!
  • Posts: 5,767
    All this talk about Glen´s Bond films makes me want to take a few days off and watch them all :-).
  • Posts: 7,006
    Way ahead of ye! Planning to watch LTK tonight! With a double bill of FYEO/OP at the weekend!
  • Posts: 4,325
    Well I'm going to watch it in a room with the man himself on Sunday!
  • edited August 2016 Posts: 11,189
    tanaka123 wrote: »
    BAIN123 wrote: »
    I like the idea of Bond being emotionally effected by a close friend being injured, but I have to admit that I find the set-up in LTK somewhat generic.

    Also, I don't particularly like Della anymore. I find her character bland and slightly annoying ("end up going fishing on my honeymoon") and her relationship with Bond not all that convincing.

    That said I LOVE Dalton's response when she talks about marriage outside the house. Actually, one of my favourite moments of his.

    She was in an episode of Starsky and Hutch though!

    I've not seen Starsky and Hutch but I have seen a rather graphic photo of her with her legs apart. To be honest that kind of made me think less of both the Priscilla Barnes and Della as a character. There's not a lot to her other than just being a bit of a ditzy blonde and sacrificial lamb. Her best bit is when she's "shushed" gently by one of Sanchez's thugs.
  • Posts: 7,006
    Good for you tanaka123! You might ask him does he regret not getting to do 3rd Bond with Dalton! Or even how he thinks TLD might have turned out, had Brossa starred in it!
  • edited August 2016 Posts: 4,622
    BAIN123 wrote: »
    i can't quite put my finger on it but i do think that sometimes Dalton almost pushed his performances a bit too much to the point where it came off as a little fake.

    He had some really good scenes, but there were others that just felt like he was using all his acting chops as opposed to being genuine (the scene with Lupe in the casino, finding Della and even the scene with M where Brown easily gives the better performance).

    He was acting tough rather than actually being tough - especially in LTK.

    A good example is the beginning of this scene. Notice his dramatic stares, the double take when the waitress comes and the way he stares at Pam waiting for her to deliver her line.


    It's ultimately all opinion though,

    Indeed. Thoughout the bar scene (pre the fight) he has this maniacal glare on his face the whole time.

    Bond is supposed to look tough yes, but not psychotic.

    I have to say I find Dalton's performance in TLD infinitely superior to LTK where he comes across as too theatrical most of the time and downright hammy on occasion. His overacting in the scene where he finds Felix and Della bears no comparison to the similar but sublime scene in TLD where he finds Saunders.

    Yes Dalts is guilty of overacting at times. Yes to what I have bolded above from both @wiz and @bain.
    Hammy, yes! I also cringe a tad when I hear his delivery of the strawberry jam line in TLD. I know the reference is a direct lift from the Fleming short story, but I don't hear Bond delivering like that.
    Dalton oversells it I think. He is guilty of over-dramatics, extra emotion at times.
    My question for Glen then is.... when directing their two films, did he feel a need to curb Dalts Shakesperian tendencies?


    As for screen Bond vs book Bond. I personally think Connery nailed book-Bond, with direction from Young initially.
    I say this because, even though we were privy to much of book-Bonds internal monologue, and thus knew how he was feeling, his emotions etc, I don't get the impression he was wearing these feelings on his sleeves, so to speak.
    Outwardly, to those who encounter him, we have every reason to believe he appears ever relaxed and menacing. Book-bond holds it together. This is the external Bond persona.
    This is what we got from Connery. He was unflappable, with occasional glimpses of emotion, such as when those near to him got killed.
    Book-Bond also was no dour sourpuss. He's very glib. Dangerous but charming. He cracks lines throughout the books, notably in GF and in the latter stages of YOLT - at least those are two examples that immediately come to mind.
    IMO the Bond persona, both lit and film is relaxed and menacing. Exception granted of course for time shortly following supervillain blowing away your just-married true love.
    Otherwise Bond holds it together like Connery.
    But what takes away from this argument somewhat is that Connery seems to have a different facial look than how most of us envision Bond's mug.
    I am a Connery purist, but even when I read the books, I can't conjure up images of Connery. Rather I picture a harder edged Roger Moore, as ideally I think that is what Bond looks like.
  • My question to John Glen, which could be quite interesting, is this - if he was given the chance to remake License to Kill, but as an animated film with animated talking animals instead, which animated animal would Bond be and which animated animal would Sanchez be?
  • Posts: 4,325
    My question to John Glen, which could be quite interesting, is this - if he was given the chance to remake License to Kill, but as an animated film with animated talking animals instead, which animated animal would Bond be and which animated animal would Sanchez be?

    Don't think that's a question I'll put to him ....
  • @tanaka123 That's absolutely fine, Tanaka, I was just trying to think outside of the box. I see Sanchez as a fox and Bond as a wolf, myself. Dario would most certainly be a shark. At the end they could do an animated musical dance number of 'License to Kill'.
  • Posts: 4,325
    @tanaka123 That's absolutely fine, Tanaka, I was just trying to think outside of the box. I see Sanchez as a fox and Bond as a wolf, myself. Dario would most certainly be a shark. At the end they could do an animated musical dance number of 'License to Kill'.

    I have one problem with that - 'License to Kill' should be 'Licence to Kill' - Americans! :P
  • @tanaka123 You know the worst thing about that? I'm actually British! My brain gets a bit muddled at times, so please excuse my Americanism!
  • Posts: 11,425
    suavejmf wrote: »
    Ah right...hadn't noticed. Your right then that's not how Bond should say it! He's not from Leeds! ;)

    He did grow up in the north though. Think he lived in Derbyshire and went to school in Manchester
  • Posts: 4,325
    Getafix wrote: »
    suavejmf wrote: »
    Ah right...hadn't noticed. Your right then that's not how Bond should say it! He's not from Leeds! ;)

    He did grow up in the north though. Think he lived in Derbyshire and went to school in Manchester

    According to Wikipaedia he's part Welsh, part English, part American.
  • MayDayDiVicenzoMayDayDiVicenzo Here and there
    Posts: 5,080
    tanaka123 wrote: »
    Getafix wrote: »
    suavejmf wrote: »
    Ah right...hadn't noticed. Your right then that's not how Bond should say it! He's not from Leeds! ;)

    He did grow up in the north though. Think he lived in Derbyshire and went to school in Manchester

    According to Wikipaedia he's part Welsh, part English, part American.

    And part wolf.
  • Posts: 4,325
    @tanaka123 You know the worst thing about that? I'm actually British! My brain gets a bit muddled at times, so please excuse my Americanism!

    Thanks for the compliment you paid me in that thread that's just been removed - I'm honoured.
Sign In or Register to comment.