Last Movie you Watched?

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  • Posts: 15,801
    Can't go wrong with THE ASPHALT JUNGLE, @Dwayne.
  • edited May 2023 Posts: 1,639
    Knives Out 4/6 , just average fare imo

    sometimes i watch films and never finish em , bad habit.....Akiko did an italian comedy called Akiko
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,524
    Tracy wrote: »
    Knives Out 4/6 , just average fare imo

    Are you going to watch the sequel, @Tracy?
  • Posts: 6,710
    I have not seen this movie. But if the rest of it is as funny as this scene, I've got to.

    The only thing you have to know here is that the fat guy is a policeman.

  • Posts: 372
    I also thought Knives Out was just ok. The critics overrated it quite a bit. However I thought Glass Onion was much more fun.
  • Posts: 1,639
    DarthDimi wrote: »
    Tracy wrote: »
    Knives Out 4/6 , just average fare imo

    Are you going to watch the sequel, @Tracy?

    i might
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    Posts: 8,675
    We watched this tonight (ok, last night by now). It came yesterday as a new issue for Germany, but I had another appointment, otherwise I would have been eager to watch it immediately and not wait another night

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    It's another example for my theory that Spielberg can do no wrong in making movies, whatever the subject. It's certainly no-action and no-suspense, but rather a tragicomedy/drama, but for me throroughly enjoyable, and giving you quite a few hints as to how the genius of Steven Spielberg came about...without showing off his rise to stardom afterwards. It ends when the protagonist (i.e. Spielberg's alter ego) goes off to Hollywood instead of college, but that's it. Marvellous performances by Michelle Williams, Paul Dano, young Gabriel LaBelle as the protagonist, and most of all Judd Hirsch as Uncle Boris.

    Lovely movie.
  • Fire_and_Ice_ReturnsFire_and_Ice_Returns I am trying to get away from this mountan!
    Posts: 23,264
    Scream VI I had fun with the film though I am a huge fan of the series, its probably the weakest film. I had issue with the ending and what they have done with the main protagonist, with Sidney who is not in this one you had a protagonist that at times felt vulnerable and in danger, the new main protagonist is too overpowered and more of a threat than Ghostface.
  • Posts: 6,799
    The Great Escape (1963)
    It was on T.V. this afternoon, and though I've seen it more times than I care to remember, it's still marvellous entertainment! And the debate over epic running times for current movies was not an issue back then, 'The Great Escape' is 165 mins and it never flags! And though it has a huge cast, you end up caring about every one towards the end, not just McQueen, Bronson, Garner, Coburn, et al, but the minor characters, they all get to shine! Great script, (from James Clavell!!) glorious score from Elmer Bernstein ( am humming it as I type this ) and terrific performances, it puts current so called blockbusters to shame!
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,617
    Mathis1 wrote: »
    The Great Escape (1963)
    It was on T.V. this afternoon, and though I've seen it more times than I care to remember, it's still marvellous entertainment! And the debate over epic running times for current movies was not an issue back then, 'The Great Escape' is 165 mins and it never flags! And though it has a huge cast, you end up caring about every one towards the end, not just McQueen, Bronson, Garner, Coburn, et al, but the minor characters, they all get to shine! Great script, (from James Clavell!!) glorious score from Elmer Bernstein ( am humming it as I type this ) and terrific performances, it puts current so called blockbusters to shame!

    Along with THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967) and THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES (1946), The Great Escape is among my favorite WW2 movies (and I'm also humming the theme as I type this). I also agree with your point about the pacing; the film never sags.
  • Posts: 17,269
    I'm on a run of watching the German Edgar Wallace "Krimi" films from the 60's/early 70's. They are silly, yet entertaining, with actors like Klaus Kinski and Eddi Arent featuring in many of the films. Karin Dor and Ilse Steppat have also featured in a few of those I've seen so far.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    Posts: 8,675
    I'm on a run of watching the German Edgar Wallace "Krimi" films from the 60's/early 70's. They are silly, yet entertaining, with actors like Klaus Kinski and Eddi Arent featuring in many of the films. Karin Dor and Ilse Steppat have also featured in a few of those I've seen so far.
    Oh my goodness...childhood memories from when we first got our b&w TV in 1965... I could never stand Eddi Arent as comic relief, and the rest is also pretty much cringe-inducing nowadays. But it's fun discovering some vistas around here posing for London and the rest of England, like Hamburg's Speicherstadt (warehouse district from the 1880s) or the castle in the suburb of Ahrensburg. Don't remember in which of those "Edgar Wallace" movies they were. But when my law partners and I moved our office to the Speicherstadt in 2009, I discovered that at the wrong end of a certain one-way street, there wasn't the usual "do not enter" sign, which normally consists of a fully-red circle with a horizontal white bar...but in this case also was marked (in English) "DO NOT [white bar] ENTER". Highly unusual, and I'm sure this was from filming some Wallace movie to make it look English.
  • Posts: 17,269
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    I'm on a run of watching the German Edgar Wallace "Krimi" films from the 60's/early 70's. They are silly, yet entertaining, with actors like Klaus Kinski and Eddi Arent featuring in many of the films. Karin Dor and Ilse Steppat have also featured in a few of those I've seen so far.
    Oh my goodness...childhood memories from when we first got our b&w TV in 1965... I could never stand Eddi Arent as comic relief, and the rest is also pretty much cringe-inducing nowadays. But it's fun discovering some vistas around here posing for London and the rest of England, like Hamburg's Speicherstadt (warehouse district from the 1880s) or the castle in the suburb of Ahrensburg. Don't remember in which of those "Edgar Wallace" movies they were. But when my law partners and I moved our office to the Speicherstadt in 2009, I discovered that at the wrong end of a certain one-way street, there wasn't the usual "do not enter" sign, which normally consists of a fully-red circle with a horizontal white bar...but in this case also was marked (in English) "DO NOT [white bar] ENTER". Highly unusual, and I'm sure this was from filming some Wallace movie to make it look English.

    Haha, yes, I can see how Arent's comic relief characters can be a bit …much – especially in the films he's breaking the fourth wall, talking directly to the audience. I find Siegfried Schürenberg's Sir John character worse in that regard, as the very stupid head of Scotland Yard. The films do have a certain charm though, and they are great time capsule films, showcasing sights of London and elsewhere in the 60's.

    Pretty funny that the English sign has presumably been there for that long! Although I'm not that familiar with Hamburg and Hamburg's Speicherstadt, and thus can't recognise it on screen, I'm pretty sure I've seen Speicherstadt mentioned in credits.
  • Fire_and_Ice_ReturnsFire_and_Ice_Returns I am trying to get away from this mountan!
    Posts: 23,264
    Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films


    Great documentary some of the decision making on many of the films made is mind boggling..
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    Posts: 8,675
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    I'm on a run of watching the German Edgar Wallace "Krimi" films from the 60's/early 70's. They are silly, yet entertaining, with actors like Klaus Kinski and Eddi Arent featuring in many of the films. Karin Dor and Ilse Steppat have also featured in a few of those I've seen so far.
    Oh my goodness...childhood memories from when we first got our b&w TV in 1965... I could never stand Eddi Arent as comic relief, and the rest is also pretty much cringe-inducing nowadays. But it's fun discovering some vistas around here posing for London and the rest of England, like Hamburg's Speicherstadt (warehouse district from the 1880s) or the castle in the suburb of Ahrensburg. Don't remember in which of those "Edgar Wallace" movies they were. But when my law partners and I moved our office to the Speicherstadt in 2009, I discovered that at the wrong end of a certain one-way street, there wasn't the usual "do not enter" sign, which normally consists of a fully-red circle with a horizontal white bar...but in this case also was marked (in English) "DO NOT [white bar] ENTER". Highly unusual, and I'm sure this was from filming some Wallace movie to make it look English.

    Haha, yes, I can see how Arent's comic relief characters can be a bit …much – especially in the films he's breaking the fourth wall, talking directly to the audience. I find Siegfried Schürenberg's Sir John character worse in that regard, as the very stupid head of Scotland Yard. The films do have a certain charm though, and they are great time capsule films, showcasing sights of London and elsewhere in the 60's.

    Pretty funny that the English sign has presumably been there for that long! Although I'm not that familiar with Hamburg and Hamburg's Speicherstadt, and thus can't recognise it on screen, I'm pretty sure I've seen Speicherstadt mentioned in credits.

    If you're interested, you might start here: https://www.filmmuseum-hamburg.de/filmstadt-hamburg/filme-aus-ueber-hh/serien/edgar-wallace.html. It's not that much, but there is a lot you can find about Hamburg (and especially Speicherstadt) locations on the web in general.

    And by the way, last time I walked through the Speicherstadt (shortly before last Christmas, and with another member of this board and his wife, by the way) I was disappointed that the English-inscribed "DO NOT ENTER" sign had been exchanged for a regular one. I wouldn't be surprised if some driver going the wrong way and having been fined had successfully argued that the sign was invalid because it didn't correspond with the traffic regulations.
  • Posts: 17,269
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    I'm on a run of watching the German Edgar Wallace "Krimi" films from the 60's/early 70's. They are silly, yet entertaining, with actors like Klaus Kinski and Eddi Arent featuring in many of the films. Karin Dor and Ilse Steppat have also featured in a few of those I've seen so far.
    Oh my goodness...childhood memories from when we first got our b&w TV in 1965... I could never stand Eddi Arent as comic relief, and the rest is also pretty much cringe-inducing nowadays. But it's fun discovering some vistas around here posing for London and the rest of England, like Hamburg's Speicherstadt (warehouse district from the 1880s) or the castle in the suburb of Ahrensburg. Don't remember in which of those "Edgar Wallace" movies they were. But when my law partners and I moved our office to the Speicherstadt in 2009, I discovered that at the wrong end of a certain one-way street, there wasn't the usual "do not enter" sign, which normally consists of a fully-red circle with a horizontal white bar...but in this case also was marked (in English) "DO NOT [white bar] ENTER". Highly unusual, and I'm sure this was from filming some Wallace movie to make it look English.

    Haha, yes, I can see how Arent's comic relief characters can be a bit …much – especially in the films he's breaking the fourth wall, talking directly to the audience. I find Siegfried Schürenberg's Sir John character worse in that regard, as the very stupid head of Scotland Yard. The films do have a certain charm though, and they are great time capsule films, showcasing sights of London and elsewhere in the 60's.

    Pretty funny that the English sign has presumably been there for that long! Although I'm not that familiar with Hamburg and Hamburg's Speicherstadt, and thus can't recognise it on screen, I'm pretty sure I've seen Speicherstadt mentioned in credits.

    If you're interested, you might start here: https://www.filmmuseum-hamburg.de/filmstadt-hamburg/filme-aus-ueber-hh/serien/edgar-wallace.html. It's not that much, but there is a lot you can find about Hamburg (and especially Speicherstadt) locations on the web in general.

    And by the way, last time I walked through the Speicherstadt (shortly before last Christmas, and with another member of this board and his wife, by the way) I was disappointed that the English-inscribed "DO NOT ENTER" sign had been exchanged for a regular one. I wouldn't be surprised if some driver going the wrong way and having been fined had successfully argued that the sign was invalid because it didn't correspond with the traffic regulations.

    Thanks, I'll have a look :-)

    That's a shame. It wouldn't have been a cultural landmark obviously, but a fun spot to visit for those who knows its origin – be it from an Edgar Wallace film or not.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    Posts: 8,675

    That's a shame. It wouldn't have been a cultural landmark obviously, but a fun spot to visit for those who knows its origin – be it from an Edgar Wallace film or not.

    I actually found a photo I took on 18 September 2009 around noon...and come to the conclusion that they probably replaced it because the red was so washed out..
    dscf0077vbfce.jpg


  • Posts: 5,800
    It could also very well be a remnant of the British Army when they occupied Hamburg atter WW II and during the Cold War. Remember the BAOR (British Army on the Rhine) ?
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    edited May 2023 Posts: 8,675
    Gerard wrote: »
    It could also very well be a remnant of the British Army when they occupied Hamburg atter WW II and during the Cold War. Remember the BAOR (British Army on the Rhine) ?

    Thanks, @Gerard - I doubt it, though. More than two-thirds of Western Germany were occupied by the US or UK after the war, and Hamburg alone probably has several hundreds of these particular traffic signs (at least as many as there are one-way streets) This is the only one that I ever saw in my life, and my memory of traffic signs stretches back until about 1960.
  • Posts: 17,269
    j_w_pepper wrote: »

    That's a shame. It wouldn't have been a cultural landmark obviously, but a fun spot to visit for those who knows its origin – be it from an Edgar Wallace film or not.

    I actually found a photo I took on 18 September 2009 around noon...and come to the conclusion that they probably replaced it because the red was so washed out..
    dscf0077vbfce.jpg


    That would make sense. Who knows, maybe there are other remnants somewhere in Hamburg from the numerous productions made during that era.
  • 007InAction007InAction Australia
    edited May 2023 Posts: 2,351
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  • edited May 2023 Posts: 15,801
    I watched PATTON yesterday. It was great.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    edited May 2023 Posts: 8,675
    ToTheRight wrote: »
    I watched PATTON yesterday. It was great.

    PATTON is my absolute favourite war/biographical movie. I think I gave it 10/10 on IMDb, something which very few movies have ever made me do. George C. Scott is outstanding, and the rest of the cast is too. Never mind that the tanks used look fake most of the time. Never mind that "Bavaria" in the end looks like where it was filmed, i.e. the Spanish sierras. The opening speech alone, with its oversized Star-Spangled Banner in the background, is priceless.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    Posts: 8,675
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    I like SPACEBALLS and watched it several times. Not as much as BLAZING SADDLES, but more than STAR WARS Episodes I through III, which caused me to stop watching further SW films.
  • Posts: 15,801
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    ToTheRight wrote: »
    I watched PATTON yesterday. It was great.

    PATTON is my absolute favourite war/biographical movie. I think I gave it 10/10 on IMDb, something which very few movies have ever made me do. George C. Scott is outstanding, and the rest of the cast is too. Never mind that the tanks used look fake most of the time. Never mind that "Bavaria" in the end looks like where it was filmed, i.e. the Spanish sierras. The opening speech alone, with its oversized Star-Spangled Banner in the background, is priceless.

    I hadn't seen it in ages and it really hit the spot. Excellent movie . I always liked George C Scott. Great actor.
  • 007InAction007InAction Australia
    Posts: 2,351
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  • Fire_and_Ice_ReturnsFire_and_Ice_Returns I am trying to get away from this mountan!
    Posts: 23,264
    442203_121814-ap-team-america-movie-img.jpg?w=1600
    Team America World Police in 4K

    This film is so stupid and utterly offensive not sure this would get a cinema release these days, its been over a decade since I watched this and its quite prophetic in some instances.
  • Posts: 1,639
    Steel Magnolias 4.5/6 , i thought it would be a bore but its actually fairly entertaining.....drama from the south with Parton/Roberts/MacLaine/Skerritt
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    edited June 2023 Posts: 8,675
    Last night I watched this:
    81jGVIleZGL._AC_SL1500_.jpg
    Directed by a rather young Guy Hamilton, this 1954 movie is an intimate-play sort of film based on a drama by J.B. Priestley. The celebration of a well-to-do family of industrialists is suddenly interrupted by the appearance of a police inspector (Alastair Sim), who inquires about the apparent suicide of a female employee of the family's company, but that employee also had somehow had some personal contact with several members of the family.

    Quite a bunch of suspense, IMO. No action, really...but no surprise being essentially the filming of a theatre play. But great acting - I think Alastair Sim, who died in 1976, has been under my radar for too long. Highly recommended.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Born on the bayou. I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'.
    edited June 2023 Posts: 8,675
    I have an old region-free DVD player myself, but I tend to not watch DVDs either any more,
    îf I can avoid it. Trouble is, I don't have a region-free BD player.
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