Where does Bond go after Craig?

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  • Mendes4LyfeMendes4Lyfe The long road ahead
    edited February 2023 Posts: 8,083
    Edgar wright is the perfect director for Bond 26. He can do humour obviously, and baby driver proves he can do action, at least chases, well. But he's also enough "indie" to appeal to the cinephiles and bring a unique vision without being generic.

    I think Cubby said when they are backed into a corner and aren't sure of the direction to go they just have to focus on being damned entertaining as possible, and it has always saved the franchise in the past (examples LALD, TSWLM, GE). They just need a no holds barred rip-roaring bond adventure to proves that still nobody does it better and the audience will come.
  • ImpertinentGoonImpertinentGoon Everybody needs a hobby.
    Posts: 1,351
    Edgar wright is the perfect director for Bond 26. He can do humour obviously, and baby driver proves he can do action, at least chases, well. But he's also enough "indie" to appeal to the cinephiles and bring a unique vision without being generic.

    I think Cubby said when they are backed into a corner and aren't sure of the direction to go they just have to focus on being damned entertaining as possible, and it has always saved the franchise in the past (examples LALD, TSWLM, GE). They just need a no holds barred rip-roaring bond adventure to proves that still nobody does it better and the audience will come.

    I would be very surprised if he weren't quite high on whatever list Eon has. British, known name, has done a $100 million franchise film that was well received, but isn't in the MCU hamster wheel, quick and fast style that would be a good change of pace after the comparatively glacial late-Craig era, knows genre inside and out. The only thing I'm not sure about is whether he would go too self-referential and satirical. But maybe that is again the change of pace from the self-serious last few films and if they want to do an out and out funny film (while not dropping to a straight comedy), he might be the right person to thread that needle, instead of getting someone hyper-serious and having a script doctor punch a few jokes in there.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,025
    IIRC, Wright has been on a shortlist of directors Eon has been interested in for awhile now. Maybe his time will come.
  • IIRC, Wright has been on a shortlist of directors Eon has been interested in for awhile now. Maybe his time will come.

    I like this choice, could play both good or bad… or both.
  • MofMI6MofMI6 Midwest US
    Posts: 4
    I believe it is time to return to basics. Fleming basics. Keep it abrasive (gritty), but take it back to the 50s where it all began. One of the great mistakes of the Bond Franchise, although it kept it alive, was to try to keep modern. I think even younger crowds could handle the dark post-war days where east and west rarely met.....much like today....and the good and bad guys were well defined. Moonraker has never been told the right way. maybe there is a place to start. But no pretty-boys, please. Fortunately, I think the sophisticated world has outgrown them, thank God.
  • SecretAgentMan⁰⁰⁷SecretAgentMan⁰⁰⁷ Lekki, Lagos, Nigeria
    Posts: 1,368
    I like Edgar Wright. But I think he's only at his absolute best when the film feels like an indie film. Don't know if Wright would be able to handle 2hrs+ of proper spy activities, without adding his usual quirky jokes.
  • JustJamesJustJames London
    Posts: 203
    Having watched plenty of period spy pieces of late (Spy City, Ipcress File, Man from Uncle, Atomic Blonde over the last few years) I actually think I *like* cinematic Bond staying modern. The books have always been a very different thing, ever since the films started, and perhaps it’s best to keep it that way. Especially as the books themselves went to being period pieces, and even having enjoyed some of those, I would say it was a mistake not to keep updating. The Horowitz Books are not *quite* as fun or even original as the Benson ones for instance.

    One thing that worked for Casino Royale now was that it was very almost a kind of undefined period piece, in that while it was ‘now’ it was a very diffrently styled ‘now’ and that anachronistic vibe really carried through the Craig era. (Nokia certainly did better in the Bond universe than real life for a start.) That is something they should consider to keep in, alongside the more arthouse visuals — very much in keeping with how the series started. Otherwise, in the modern era, we would be better off following Q, as that’s where the work is now.
  • Junglist_1985Junglist_1985 Los Angeles
    edited February 2023 Posts: 1,006
    Agreed, CR has a classic, timeless feel. It looks like it could exist in Bond’s universe of the 60s or today.
  • VenutiusVenutius Yorkshire
    Posts: 2,925
    Said it before, but I'm for timeless rather than on-trend.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,025
    Bond should look forwards, not backwards. The books and films from 60 years ago were not treated as period pieces, why should we start now? There’s nothing about the post-Cold War that has demonstrated that Bond can’t exist in modern times. It’s why I can’t get into the more recent novels. They’ve come off as indulgent nostalgic trips by boomer authors rather than authentic spy thrillers.
  • VenutiusVenutius Yorkshire
    edited March 2023 Posts: 2,925
    Yes, MGW said that 'Bond is always a contemporary character' - I don't think we're getting that authentic MR set in 1955 and filmed in black and white any time soon.
  • BirdlesonBirdleson Moderator
    edited March 2023 Posts: 2,161
    Venutius wrote: »
    Yes, MGW said that 'Bond is always a contemporary character' - I don't think we're getting that authentic MR set in 1955 and filmed in black and white any time soon.

    Probably not. But that would be my dream Bond film. Closer to the book the better. With a relatively unknown cast as Bond. The problem is that everyone that I can envision directing such a film is dead: David Lean, Stanley Kubrick, Powell and Pressburger, John Frankenheimer, and, in the style of his early British work, Alfred Hitchcock.
  • Posts: 2,887
    JustJames wrote: »
    Having watched plenty of period spy pieces of late (Spy City, Ipcress File, Man from Uncle, Atomic Blonde over the last few years) I actually think I *like* cinematic Bond staying modern. The books have always been a very different thing, ever since the films started, and perhaps it’s best to keep it that way. Especially as the books themselves went to being period pieces, and even having enjoyed some of those, I would say it was a mistake not to keep updating. The Horowitz Books are not *quite* as fun or even original as the Benson ones for instance.

    One thing that worked for Casino Royale now was that it was very almost a kind of undefined period piece, in that while it was ‘now’ it was a very diffrently styled ‘now’ and that anachronistic vibe really carried through the Craig era. (Nokia certainly did better in the Bond universe than real life for a start.) That is something they should consider to keep in, alongside the more arthouse visuals — very much in keeping with how the series started. Otherwise, in the modern era, we would be better off following Q, as that’s where the work is now.

    I get that. Even NTTD feels pretty undefined in terms of when it actually takes place. There’s this bizarre nanobot technology which we obviously don’t have at the current time, and yet feels like it could be one step away.
  • ImpertinentGoonImpertinentGoon Everybody needs a hobby.
    Posts: 1,351
    It is interesting that they largely create this slightly timeless feeling by using less or older tech instead of the old "science fact" "five years into the future".
  • Mendes4LyfeMendes4Lyfe The long road ahead
    Posts: 8,083
    I like the idea of a director that isn't cookie-cutter and you can tell when a film is made by him. Kinda like Burton did with batman, or Raimi with Spider-man. I want to see someone's fingerprints on a film, not some committee agreed upon product. Edgar Wright is one of those names who has a big reputation without much mainstream success. Baby driver was a big hit, but his next film flopped and he's never been given the keys to direct a major franchise before (I don't count the ant-man fiasco). Someone needs to take advantage of his creative talent, and it might as well be Bond if you ask me. If EON is looking to take the franchise in a slightly more ironic direction with overt some humour and flair, then I think he's perfect, just like Shane Black was for iron man 3.
  • ImpertinentGoonImpertinentGoon Everybody needs a hobby.
    Posts: 1,351
    Somehow I totally forgot that he didn't end up directing Ant-Man...
  • edited March 2023 Posts: 2,887
    I'm not sure if we'll necessarily get something more kinetic or even overly humorous from Wright if he were to direct to be completely honest. The Bond films can never be anyone's 'baby' in the sense that so many different people work on them. Traditionally the directors were all very much 'in house' having worked their way up through the British studio system and were there to interpret the script/what the producers wanted. Even in our current age where high profile directors tend to have more creative control I don't think we've ever had an 'auteur's' Bond film. Any of the director's 'fingerprints' or trademarks within their Bond film will be there, but not necessarily at the forefront.

    I do like Wright though. I much prefer him to Nolan or Villeneuve for Bond 26. I'd be very happy if he were picked. But I do feel there might be better suited or even more interesting choices.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,536

    Pierce could almost pass for Fleming's Blofeld with that look.
  • VenutiusVenutius Yorkshire
    Posts: 2,925
    Birdleson wrote: »
    Venutius wrote: »
    Yes, MGW said that 'Bond is always a contemporary character' - I don't think we're getting that authentic MR set in 1955 and filmed in black and white any time soon.

    Probably not. But that would be my dream Bond film. Closer to the book the better.
    Absolutely, Birdleson. Just the thought of it is enough to start a what-if reverie! :D
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython “Baja?!”
    Posts: 8,025
    I’ll concede to being interested in 50s/60s setting films, but ONLY if they are adaptations of the novels.
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    Posts: 5,976
    I think that they literally can't do period pieces, because their financing is *so* reliant on product placement. Nobody wants a 1950s rotary phone!
  • VenutiusVenutius Yorkshire
    Posts: 2,925
    Oh, I don't imagine for a second that it'd ever happen - like Birdleson said, it's a 'dream film.' I've long dreamt of a QOS Redux, too, but that's not going to happen either. More's the pity!
  • Posts: 3,279
    I’ll concede to being interested in 50s/60s setting films, but ONLY if they are adaptations of the novels.

    There would be no other reason to go back otherwise. I agree.
  • timdalton007timdalton007 North Alabama
    Posts: 154
    Venutius wrote: »
    Yes, MGW said that 'Bond is always a contemporary character' - I don't think we're getting that authentic MR set in 1955 and filmed in black and white any time soon.
    Birdleson wrote: »

    Probably not. But that would be my dream Bond film. Closer to the book the better. With a relatively unknown cast as Bond.

    I suspect it’ll take the books going into public domain for it to happen. The real question then is how the public reacts to a Bond film without the Eon trappings. True, we have the likes of NSNA and the Radio 4 dramatizations that show the idea could work, but will it in practice?
  • Posts: 2,887
    Venutius wrote: »
    Yes, MGW said that 'Bond is always a contemporary character' - I don't think we're getting that authentic MR set in 1955 and filmed in black and white any time soon.
    Birdleson wrote: »

    Probably not. But that would be my dream Bond film. Closer to the book the better. With a relatively unknown cast as Bond.

    I suspect it’ll take the books going into public domain for it to happen. The real question then is how the public reacts to a Bond film without the Eon trappings. True, we have the likes of NSNA and the Radio 4 dramatizations that show the idea could work, but will it in practice?

    The most discussed thing I've seen is a Netflix/streaming show set in the 50s/60s with faithful adaptations of the Fleming books.

    Not sure if it's something I'd want to be completely honest. I do think there'd be a lot more 'retrospective commentary' than maybe some fans would want (more along the lines of Mad Men in places than the more fantastical/escapist spirit of the novels and films). Many of the books such as GF are arguably weaker in terms of story than their film counterparts, and I'm not entirely sure they'd be as good.
  • Posts: 3,279
    007HallY wrote: »
    Venutius wrote: »
    Yes, MGW said that 'Bond is always a contemporary character' - I don't think we're getting that authentic MR set in 1955 and filmed in black and white any time soon.
    Birdleson wrote: »

    Probably not. But that would be my dream Bond film. Closer to the book the better. With a relatively unknown cast as Bond.

    I suspect it’ll take the books going into public domain for it to happen. The real question then is how the public reacts to a Bond film without the Eon trappings. True, we have the likes of NSNA and the Radio 4 dramatizations that show the idea could work, but will it in practice?

    The most discussed thing I've seen is a Netflix/streaming show set in the 50s/60s with faithful adaptations of the Fleming books.

    Not sure if it's something I'd want to be completely honest. I do think there'd be a lot more 'retrospective commentary' than maybe some fans would want (more along the lines of Mad Men in places than the more fantastical/escapist spirit of the novels and films). Many of the books such as GF are arguably weaker in terms of story than their film counterparts, and I'm not entirely sure they'd be as good.

    Certain books to film would be out of the running, as they are already pretty faithful to the book, and set in in a time not far off when the books were written. The first 4 Connery films, plus OHMSS. So there is 5 off the list.

    The rest - CR isn't too far off in a modern day setting, LALD has had just about every scene adapted from the book and appears in LALD, FYEO and LTK. FYEO has adapted two short stories fairly well, likewise OP has adapted all 3 short stories fairly well, in 2 different films.

    But I would love to see faithful adaptations of DAF, MR, YOLT, TSWLM and TMWTGG. Ironically these are the last remaining novels that have yet to be properly adapted, either as full novels, or even certain scenes from the books.
  • Posts: 2,887
    007HallY wrote: »
    Venutius wrote: »
    Yes, MGW said that 'Bond is always a contemporary character' - I don't think we're getting that authentic MR set in 1955 and filmed in black and white any time soon.
    Birdleson wrote: »

    Probably not. But that would be my dream Bond film. Closer to the book the better. With a relatively unknown cast as Bond.

    I suspect it’ll take the books going into public domain for it to happen. The real question then is how the public reacts to a Bond film without the Eon trappings. True, we have the likes of NSNA and the Radio 4 dramatizations that show the idea could work, but will it in practice?

    The most discussed thing I've seen is a Netflix/streaming show set in the 50s/60s with faithful adaptations of the Fleming books.

    Not sure if it's something I'd want to be completely honest. I do think there'd be a lot more 'retrospective commentary' than maybe some fans would want (more along the lines of Mad Men in places than the more fantastical/escapist spirit of the novels and films). Many of the books such as GF are arguably weaker in terms of story than their film counterparts, and I'm not entirely sure they'd be as good.

    Certain books to film would be out of the running, as they are already pretty faithful to the book, and set in in a time not far off when the books were written. The first 4 Connery films, plus OHMSS. So there is 5 off the list.

    The rest - CR isn't too far off in a modern day setting, LALD has had just about every scene adapted from the book and appears in LALD, FYEO and LTK. FYEO has adapted two short stories fairly well, likewise OP has adapted all 3 short stories fairly well, in 2 different films.

    But I would love to see faithful adaptations of DAF, MR, YOLT, TSWLM and TMWTGG. Ironically these are the last remaining novels that have yet to be properly adapted, either as full novels, or even certain scenes from the books.

    I’d argue YOLT is tricky to adapt faithfully. A big chunk of it is Bond and Tanaka wandering across a sort of half real half fantasy version of Japan. A lot of the drama with Bond recovering from his PTSD is pretty subtle and I can imagine many writers/directors not getting to grips with it. TSWLM is another odd with of course Viv being the sole focus for the majority of the story.

    DAF and TMWTGG would be ideal for adaptation in the sense that they have some overt flaws with them which could be ironed out with a good script (much like how GF did this by having Galore’s character work for Goldfinger and changing the plot to blowing up Fort Knox).
  • Bentley007Bentley007 Manitoba, Canada
    edited March 2023 Posts: 566


    Anyone think Taron actually knows something? Could suggest that Barbara was bluffing with her most recent comments on Bond 26.
  • Mendes4LyfeMendes4Lyfe The long road ahead
    Posts: 8,083
    OH. MY. GAWD.

    They can probably get working on bond 26 much sooner than any of us thought.

    this has to be the biggest news we've had it months...
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